Section History 2000 – 2009

A Chronicle of the
Philadelphia Section PGA and its Members
by Peter C. Trenham
2000 to 2009


Contents
2000 Jack Connelly was elected president of the PGA of America and John DiMarco won the New Jersey Open
2001 Terry Hatch won the stroke play and the match play tournaments at the PGA winter activities in Port St. Lucie
2002 The Section hosted the PGA of America national meeting at the Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel in Philadelphia
2003 Jim Furyk won the U.S. Open, Greg Farrow won the N.J. Open, Tom Carter won 3 times on the Nationwide Tour
2004 Pete Oakley won the Senior British Open
2005 Will Reilly was the PGA of America’s “Junior Golf Leader” and Rich Steinmetz was on the PGA Cup Team
2006 Jim Furyk played on his fifth straight Ryder Cup Team, won the Vardon Trophy and two PGA Tour events
2007 In October the Philadelphia PGA and the Variety Club broke ground on the Variety Club’s 3-hole golf course
2008 Tom Carpus won the PGA of America’s Horton Smith Award and Hugh Reilly received the President Plaque
2009 Mark Sheftic finished second in the PGA Professional National Championship and played on the PGA Cup Team


2000
Jim Furyk won the Doral Open on the Doral Golf Resort’s Blue Course in the first week of March. The course nicknamed the “Blue Monster” had been toughened in 1996 by adding 27 bunkers, which most of the players didn’t care for. In 1999 the course had been reworked to its original Dick Wilson design, but now most of the players thought the course was too easy. The scores were low and Furyk took advantage of the changes. He put together rounds of 65, 67, 68 and 65, which added up to a 23 under par 265. Franklin Langham finished second at 267 and Nick Price was third at 270. David Duval and Shigeki Maruyama tied for fourth with 271s. First prize was $540,000 and the total payout was $3,000,000.

The spring meeting of the Philadelphia Section was held at the DuPont Country Club on the first Monday of April. An item of interest was that major league tournament golf was back in the Section for the first time since the U.S. Open was at the Merion Golf Club in 1971. The PGA Tour’s SEI Pennsylvania Classic was being held at the Waynesborough Country Club in September and the U.S. Senior Open was scheduled for Saucon Valley Country Club in late June. Also there were two PGA Tour Buy.com tournaments being played in the Section that year. The new Steamtown Classic was scheduled for the first week of June near Scranton and the Hershey Open was to be played in early July.  

The Masters Tournament was played in the first full week of April and ended on the second Sunday. There were 95 entries from the list of invitees. Vijay Singh began with a 72 and a 67, which put him in a tie for the lead with Ernie Els. Saturday brought blustery winds and Singh put together a two under par 70 to take a three-stroke lead into the final round. Singh (278) shot a steady 69 on Sunday to win by three strokes over Els (281). First prize was $828,000. David Duval and Loren Roberts tied for third at 282. Jim Furyk tied for 14th at 289 and won $80,500. Ted Tryba missed the cut. Furyk was invited to the tournament for having finished in the top sixteen in the 1999 Masters Tournament and Tryba was invited off having been in the top 30 money winners on the PGA Tour in 1999.

The Senior PGA Championship was held at the PGA National Golf Club in the middle of April. The tournament was interrupted seven times by lightening and rain for a total of nearly 18 hours. In the end the tournament was reduced to three rounds and it still took five days to complete that. Doug Tewell led from wire to wire with three rounds in the sixties. Tewell (201) shot rounds of 68, 66 and 67 to win by seven strokes. Tom Kite, Hale Irwin, Larry Nelson and Dana Quigley tied for second with eight under par 208 totals. First prize from the $1,800,000 purse was $324,000. All five of the Philadelphia Section members in the tournament made the cut. Ed Dougherty and Jay Sigel, who were regulars on the PGA Senior Tour, tied for 12th at 214 and they each won $33,200. Aronimink Golf Club professional Jim Masserio tied for 17th at 215 and won $20,563. Ken Peyre-Ferry (223), who had left the Little Mill Country Club to pursue the PGA Senior Tour, finished tied for 54th winning $3,728. Pete Oakley (225), who was now a part-owner of a newly opened golf course called The Rookery, won $3,400 for a 66th place tie. Jack Eckenrode, who was the owner of the Growcraft Golf Center Driving Range, had to withdraw before the tournament started because of a bad back. Dougherty was exempt for having finished in the top 15 in the tournament the year before and being in the top 50 money winners on the PGA Senior Tour. Sigel was exempt for being in the top 50 money winners on the PGA Senior Tour. Masserio, Peyre-Ferry, Oakley and Eckenrode were exempt for finishing in the top 55 in the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship.

Waynesborough Country Club hosted the local qualifying for the U.S. Open on the third Thursday of May. Cavaliers Country Club professional Dave McNabb led the scoring with a one-over-par 72. There were four open spots. Amateurs Anthony Sarko (73) Dan Terleski (74) and Vince Covello (75) won the other three places in the sectional qualifying. There were 24 entered at Waynesborough.  

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at the Bucknell Golf Club on the third Thursday of May. Brian Kelly, who was in his first year as the head professional at the Bucknell Golf Club and Mike Molino, the assistant at the Huntsville Golf Club, picked up the two available spots with one over par 71s.

Joe Daley, a native of Chestnut Hill, returned to his home area for the U.S. Open local qualifying and earned the medalist honors.  Qualifying was at the Philadelphia Country Club on the fourth Monday of May. There were 110 pros and amateurs competing for eight spots at the sectional qualifying two weeks later. Daley, who was playing the PGA’s Buy.com Tour, turned in a three under par 68 to lead the field. Amateur Robin McCool and South Carolina’s Tom Shaw tied for second with 69s. Another pro, Michael Christie, was next with a 70. Eagle Lodge Country Club assistant John Spina, Links Golf Club assistant Vince Ramagli, Radnor Valley Country Club professional George Forster, Sr. and Georgia amateur Jedd McLuen won the next four places but they had to go extra holes with two other players. Spina, Ramagli and Forster survived by making pars on the first extra hole.   

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open was at the Chambersburg Country Club on the fourth Monday of May. Lebanon’s Greg Lesher, who was playing the PGA Buy.com Tour, and amateur William Smith picked up the first two places with even par 73s. Ted Sheftic’s son, Mark Sheftic, who was playing the professional golf mini tours, won the third and last spot with a three-over-par 76.

The PGA Tour’s Buy.com Steamtown Classic qualifying for Philadelphia Section members was held at the Glenmaura National Golf Club on the fourth Tuesday of May. The PGA Tour had provided three places in the tournament for Section members. Torresdale-Frankford Country Club assistant Jim Jones was low with a two-under-par 69. The other two spots went to Indian Spring Golf Club professional David Quinn (72) and Overbrook Golf Club professional Stu Ingraham (73).

On the last Tuesday of May Rick Osberg, who was now a part owner of the Kimberton Family Golf Driving Range, aced Sunnybrook Golf Club’s 15th hole on the way to winning the Rittenhouse Trust Golf Classic. Osberg completed the round in 69 strokes, which put him in at three-way tie with Stu Ingraham and Brian Kelly, who also posted three under par 69s. Osberg went on to win the first place check of $17,500 in a sudden-death playoff. David Quinn, George Forster, Sr. and St. Davids Golf Club assistant David Coates tied for fourth with 70s. There were 150 entries and the course measured 6,823 yards. The first prize was being increased $2,500 each year by the Rittenhouse Trust company.

Open qualifying for the PGA Tour’s Steamtown Classic was at the Glen Oak Country Club on the fifth Tuesday of May. Because Memorial Day was on that Monday the course wasn’t available until the next day. There were 12 openings up for grabs. Mike Molino and the host professional Cleve Coldwater had sponsor exemptions.

The PGA Buy.com Tour’s first annual Steamtown Classic was played at the Glenmaura National Golf Club on the first four days of June. Ian Leggatt (276) shot a course record tying 65 in the last round. Three putts on the last green left him one stroke out of a tie for the top spot with Jeff Hart (72-70-65-68—275) who had tied the course record the day before. Paul Gow, Charles Warren and Tommy Biershenk tied for third at 277. Par was 72. First prize from a purse of $400,000 was $81,000. Reading’s Rick Price won $2,610 as he tied for 36th at 286. Joe Daley shot 292 and won $1,507.50 for a 52nd place tie. Stu Ingraham, the host professional Cleve Coldwater, David Quinn, Mike Molino, Greg Lesher and Jim Jones missed the cut. Price, Daley and Lesher were regulars on the Buy.com Tour. Clearwater and Molino had sponsor exemptions. Ingraham, Quinn and Jones had qualified at the Section qualifier.  

Joe Daley was successful in the sectional qualifying for the U.S. Open at the Canoe Brook Country Club in Summit, New Jersey. Qualifying was held at Canoe Brook on the first Tuesday of June but due to rain and high winds only 21 of the 118 players were able to complete the necessary two rounds. Daley was one of the players that had to return to Canoe Brook the next morning at 8:30 to try and secure one of the 20 passes to the U.S. Open. Daley’s (71-75) 146 tied for tenth. Mike Burke, Jr. led with a (72-67) 139 and players who posted 147 totals won the last places. Jim Furyk was exempt from local and sectional qualifying.  

The Variety Club Tournament of Champions was played at the White Manor Country Club in the second week of June. The two-day tournament came down to a duel between The Country Club at Woodloch Springs professional John Pillar and Jimmy Booros, who was now the teaching pro at the Growcraft Golf Center Driving Range. They were paired together in the final group the last day and finished the 36-holes tied at five under par 139. Booros (68-71) and Pillar (66-73) both made pars on the first playoff hole (#10) and on the next playoff hole Pillar won out with a birdie on the par four eighteenth hole. Concord Country Club professional Mike Moses finished third at 140 and Vince Ramagli was fourth with a total of 142. The first day the pros all played with amateurs to raise money for the Variety Club’s charity and their scores were part of their totals for the individual pro money. The total purse was $30,000 and first prize was $5,500.

The U.S. Open was played at the Pebble Beach Golf Links in Monterey, California during the third week of June. There were 8,455 entries that year. Having grown up in California, Tiger Woods was very familiar with Pebble Beach and he showed the golf world how to play the course that week. In the first round Woods teed off early and posted a six under par 65 that consisted of twelve pars and six birdies. Later that day fog rolled in off the Pacific Ocean and 25 players were not able to complete their rounds. The next day the start of play was delayed by fog, this time for another 90 minutes. Because of the delay Woods only got in 12 holes that day but he now stood at nine under par for the tournament. Early Saturday morning Woods completed his second round and in spite of taking six strokes on each of the two par five holes on the back nine he finished with a 69. Saturday afternoon came up windy but Woods shot a 71, which included a triple-bogey on the third hole. On Sunday Woods shot a steady four birdie-fourteen par 67. His twelve under par 272 won by an incredible fifteen strokes over Ernie Els and Angel Jimenez who tied for second with 287s. Par at Pebble Beach is usually 72 but the second hole was changed from a par five to a par four for the tournament. John Huston finished fourth at 288. Ted Tryba tied for 37th at 298 and won $22,056. Jim Furyk posted a 305 to finish 60th and won $11,425. Joe Daley missed the cut and received a check for $1,000. First prize was $800,000. Woods broke Old Tom Morris’ record for the margin of victory (set in 1862) in a major championship by two strokes. Tryba and Furyk were in the tournament off having been in the top 30 on the 1999 PGA Tour money list. Daley was there by having made it through both the local and sectional qualifying events. The total purse was $4,500,000.

Qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open was held at the Moselem Springs Golf Club on the third Thursday of June. Due to the U.S. Senior Open being held at the Saucon Valley Country Club there was a large field of 120 professionals and amateurs attempting to qualify but no one was able to break or equal the par of 70. In spite of the large field there were just three spots to qualify for. Pete Oakley earned medalist honors with a 71 and Saucon Valley amateur Gary Daniels was next with a 72. There was a five-way tie at 73 for the third opening that Orlando’s Dan Wood won in a sudden-death playoff over Whitford Country Club teaching professional Mike Thompson, Atlantic City Country Club professional Billy Ziobro, Huntsville Country Club professional Tim Foran and amateur Darrell Lawson. Ed Dougherty and Jay Sigel were exempt off their positions on the 1999 PGA Senior Tour money list.

On the third Thursday of June qualifying for the Buy.com Hershey Open for Section professionals was held on the Hershey Country Club’s East Course. There were three spots to qualify for. Mountain Valley Golf Club professional Terry Hatch led with a five under par 68. Blue Ridge Country Club assistant Jeff Daniels took the second spot with a 69. Gulph Mills Golf Club professional Terry Hertzog  picked up the third spot. The Hershey Open was also going to be played on the East Course as well, in the first week of July.

Dick Smith, Sr., the owner of the Williamstown Golf Center Driving Range, qualified for the U.S. Senior Open in New York at the Scarsdale Golf Club on the third Tuesday of June. There were three spots open at Scarsdale as well. Doug Steffen led with a three under par 69 and Smith was next with a 70. The last place went to Montomasa Aoki (71) in a three-man sudden-death playoff.

The National Club Professional Championship was played at the Oak Tree Golf Club, in Edmond, Oklahoma during the fourth week of June. After three rounds Tim Theien (72-70-72) and Mark Brown (70-73-71) were tied for the lead at one over par 214. Seven hours of lightening caused the cancellation of the final round and the tournament was reduced to three rounds. The PGA then went to its contingency plan, which was for five holes of stroke-play to determine a winner. Thein prevailed over Brown by one stroke. Shawn Kelly (215) finished third and Jeff Freeman (217) was fourth. Terry Hatch (229) tied for 56th and won $1,240. Jason Lamp (233), the professional at the Blue Heron Pines Golf Club, also made the cut and tied for 70th, winning $990. Rick Osberg and Stu Ingraham missed the cut. First prize was $40,000 and the total prize money came to $300,000. The top 25 players qualified for the PGA Championship.

Pine Valley Golf Club assistant Evan Belcher won the Philadelphia Section Assistant Championship, which was played at the Whitetail Golf Club and the Southmoore Golf Club, on the fourth Monday of June. Belcher fired a seven under par 65 at Whitetail in the morning and came back in the afternoon with a two under par 69 at Southmoore. His 134 total was four strokes better than Wilmington Country Club assistant Dave Seeman (138) and eight strokes better than Aronimink Golf Club assistant Jamie Komancheck (142) who finished third. Olde Masters Driving Range teaching pro Brian Lee was fourth at 143.

The U.S. Senior Open was at the Saucon Valley Country Club in late June and ended on second day of July. Hale Irwin took home the title for the second time in three years. Bruce Fleisher led after three rounds but Irwin blew him away with a last round 65. Irwin’s rounds were 66, 71, 65 and 65 for a seventeen under par 267. He made 23 birdies on the weekend. Fleisher put together a decent round of 70 on Sunday but he ended up three strokes back at 270. It was Irwin’s 28th victory on the PGA Senior Tour. Tom Kite (272) and Raymond Floyd (274) finished third and fourth. Ed Dougherty tied for 37th at 289 and won $12,179. Pete Oakley finished at 290 and tied for 41st, winning $10,410. Jay Sigel and Dick Smith, Sr. missed the cut. Dougherty was in the field for having been in the top 30 money winners on the PGA Senior Tour in 1999 and Sigel was there for having won a tournament on the PGA Senior Tour in the past two years. First prize was $400,000 from a total purse of $2,250,000. The host professional was Gene Mattare.

Open qualifying for the PGA Tour’s Buy.com Hershey Open was held at the Royal Oak Golf Club on the first Tuesday of July.

The $400,000 PGA Tour’s Buy.com Hershey Open was played on the Hershey Country Club’s East Course in the first full week of July. The Buy.com Tour was the second tier of the PGA Tour but even par didn’t usually come close to winning. That week and that golf course was an exception. Par was 71 and the course measured 7,100 yards. Paul Gow (281) shot four steady rounds of 72, 68, 70 and 71 to edge out Paul Claxton (282) by one stroke. Claxton’s bunker shot on the final hole stopped eight inches short of the hole. Joe Daley, J.J. Henry, Shane Bertsch and Todd Demsey tied for third at 283, so only six players broke par for the tournament. First prize was $72,000 and Daley won $19,200. Rick Price tied for 41st with a 295 total and won $1,880. Terry Hatch finished at 303 in 57th place, winning $1,260. Greg Lesher, Terry Hertzog, Jim Sullivan, Jeff Daniels, Ben Witter and Stuart Hanford missed the cut. The host professional was Mike Battistelli. Witter, the Iron Valley Golf Club professional and Hanford, who was now a teaching pro at Hershey Country Club, had sponsor exemptions. Daley, Price and Lesher were on the Buy.com Tour. Daniels, Hatch and Hertzog qualified in the Section qualifier.

The Torresdale-Frankford Country Club hosted the Philadelphia Open on the second Wednesday of July. At the end of the day three pros were tied at the top of the leader board with one over par 141s. One of those was Pete Oakley (70-71) who had won the tournament on two other occasions. A second one was Brian Kelly (70-71) who had won everything in the Philadelphia Section except the Philadelphia Open. The third member of the group was Cedarbrook Country Club assistant Dave Roberts (72-69) who was just coming into his own when it came to the Section’s major tournaments. Roberts, who was completing his afternoon round on the 9th hole, birdied three of the last four holes to make it into the playoff. George Forster, Sr., Terry Hatch and Mike Moses tied for fourth with 142s. Eight days later an 18-hole playoff was held at Torresdale-Frankford. In the playoff Kelly made just one bogey as he posted a 69 to win the only major title in the Philadelphia Section that had eluded him. Oakley shot a 72 and Roberts a 73. First prize was $3,200.

DiMarco, John (TGH)
John DiMarco

Laurel Creek Country Club assistant John DiMarco won the New Jersey State Open in the second week of July at the Rock Spring Club. It was the first time that a professional from the Philadelphia Section won the tournament since Pine Valley Golf Club’s Ted Turner won it in 1938. The nearest anyone had come was 1943 when George Fazio lost to Vic Ghezzi in a playoff. DiMarco (70-69-66-70) and Essex Fells’ Chris Mazzuchetti (68-70-68-69) finished the four-day tournament tied at 275. A sudden-death playoff was held to determine the winner. The playoff went seven holes before DiMarco wrapped up the win. Mike Burke, Jr. and amateur Corey Brigham tied for third at 276. The course measured 6,445 yards and par was 70.

On the fourth Sunday of July Tiger Woods won his first British Open. Woods had now won all four major championships and at age 24 he was the youngest to accomplish that feat. Ernie Els also made history by finishing second in three straight major tournaments. The tournament was played at the par 72 Old Course in St. Andrews, Scotland. Woods (269) put together rounds of 67, 66, 67 and 69 to finish eight strokes in front of Els (277) and Thomas Bjorn (277). Tom Lehman and David Toms tied for fourth at 278. Jim Furyk tied for 42nd at 287 and won $15,707. Ted Tryba missed the cut. First prize was $759,150. Jack Nicklaus was in the field playing in his last British Open. Furyk and Tryba were in the tournament field off their positions in the top 30 money winners on the 1999 U.S. PGA Tour.

Ed Dougherty won the Coldwater Banker Burnett Classic in Coon Rapids, Minnesota on the first Sunday of August. The tournament was held at the 6,914-yard par 72 Bunker Hills Golf Course. Dougherty (197) earned his first victory on the PGA Senior Tour with three solid rounds of 65, 66 and 66. Dougherty began the last round with a one-stroke lead. On the second hole of his last round he holed a sixty-five yard wedge shot for an eagle three and never looked back as he won by two strokes. On the last three holes Dougherty holed three short but missable putts to hold on to the lead. Hale Irwin and Gil Morgan tied for second at 199. Chuck Moran came in fourth at 204. Dougherty took away a check for $240,000

The Philadelphia Section PGA Club Professional Championship was played in the second week of August at the Little Mill Country Club. This was the qualifying event for the Eastern Club Professional Championship and based on the number of entries from the Section, Philadelphia had been allotted eleven spots. Deerwood Country Club professional Greg Farrow led the qualifying with a 69 on Thursday and a 68 on Friday for a five under par 137. Pete Oakley and Vince Ramagli tied for second with 138s. Jason Lamp and David Quinn picked up the fourth and fifth places with 140s. Places six through ten went to Ken Peyre-Ferry, George Forster, Sr. Mike Moses, Evan Belcher and Bent Creek Country Club teaching pro Paul Oglesby, as they posted 142s. Manufacturers Golf & Country Club assistant Bob Fritz (143) defeated Terry Hatch (143) in a sudden-death playoff for the eleventh spot. The course measured 6,821 yards. With the Section Championship being held too late for the winner to qualify for the Eastern CPC, Hatch got into the tournament in place of the Section’s champion.

Terry Hertzog won the Pennsylvania Open on his home course, the Gulph Mills Golf Club, in the middle of August. The tournament began on a Monday but rain and lightning arrived at Gulph Mills before all the 132 contestants had even teed off. After a wait of four hours and 27 minutes it was decided that no more golf could be played that day. The first round was completed on Tuesday and the field was then cut to the low 40 and ties, rather than the cut coming after two rounds. It took a score of two over par 73 or better to be able to stay around for the last 36 holes on Wednesday. John Pillar led by two strokes after the first round with a five under par 66. Hertzog, who had shot a 69 in the first round, put together another 69 in the morning of the final day and then came back in the afternoon with a 68 that included birdies on the last three holes. His 206 total nipped Pillar (66-72-69—207) by one stroke. Huntingdon Valley’s Jim Sullivan, Jr., who was playing the mini-tours, finished third at 211. Western Pennsylvania’s John Mazza and Rick Stimmel tied for fourth with 214 totals. There was qualifying at several locations in the state in order to bring the number in the starting field to a manageable number. Again the purse totaled $50,000 and Hertzog took away a check for $10,000.  

For the second straight year Tiger Woods won the PGA Championship and he was also the first to repeat as the champion since the tournament was changed to stroke play in 1958. He also was the first to win three major titles in the same year since Ben Hogan in 1953. The tournament was played in Louisville, Kentucky at the PGA’s 7,167 yard Valhalla Golf Club in third week of August. Woods (66-67-70-67) and Bob May (72, 66, 66, 66) each shot 31 on the last nine holes and ended up in a tie at 270. For the first time in the history of the tournament a three-hole playoff was held to determine the winner. The playoff was held on holes 16, 17 and 18. Woods had birdied the last two holes of regulation play to get the tie and he made a birdie on the first hole of the playoff. Two more pars by Woods made him the winner. First prize was $900,000. Thomas Bjorn finished third at 275. Stuart Appleby, Greg Chalmers and Jose Maria Olazabal tied for fourth with 276 totals. Jim Furyk tied for 72nd at 294 and won 9,275. Ted Tryba missed the cut. Furyk and Tryba were in the tournament off their positions on the PGA Tour money list along with other exemptions.

Qualifying for the Senior Club Professional Championship was played at the Brandywine Country Club on third Thursday of August. Pete Oakley was exempt as the winner of the national championship in 1999. The Section had two spots to qualify for. Mike Atkins, who had been the professional at the Country Club of Harrisburg, was the low scorer as he posted a 71 and a 74 for a three-over-par 145. Ken Peyre-Ferry (147) won the other spot. Atkins didn’t play in the national championship. Jim Masserio was exempt off having finished tied for fourth in the tournament the year before.

Fieldstone Golf Club teaching pro Chris Anderson, Terry Hatch and Rick Osberg made it through the PGA Tour SEI Pennsylvania Classic qualifying for Section members at the Waynesborough Country Club on the third Friday of August.

Chris Anderson won the two-day Shawnee Open at the Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort on the fourth Tuesday of August. Anderson (136) started slowly with a 71 the first day but he came back the second day with a seven under par 65 to win by two strokes over David Quinn (138), John Pillar (138) and Shawnee assistant Rob Bowser (138), who all tied for second. Anderson’s 65 was the low round of the tournament by three strokes.  

Rob Shuey, the golf professional at the Golf Club @ Felicita, won the Whitford Classic at the Whitford Country Club in the second week of September. On Sunday the pros were paired with amateurs. There were two pros and two amateurs in each pairing with the pro’s score counting toward the two-day total. Shuey (135) shot a six under par 66 on Sunday and a 69 on Monday to win by four strokes over Sunnybrook Golf Club teaching pro Bill Sautter (139). Jim Masserio and Mike Moses tied for third at 140. There were 79 pros in the field.

Open qualifying for the PGA Tour SEI Pennsylvania Classic was held at the Radnor Valley Country Club on the second Monday of September. There were four open spots and four players posted three under par 67s. Two of the qualifiers were Jim Sullivan, Jr. and Yardley’s Nick Napoleon who were playing on the minitours. They were joined by Bobby Gage and Korky Kemp. The course measured 6,562 yards.    

After a 29 year period of time the PGA Tour returned to the Philadelphia Section in mid September. The tournament was the 3.2 million dollar SEI Pennsylvania Classic and it was played at the Waynesborough Country Club. Because of the time of year the tournament didn’t draw a very strong field but the players that were entered had high praise for the 6,939 yard course. Due to the weakness of the field, players as high as 196th on the year 2,000 money list were able to enter the tournament. Emlyn Aubrey, a native of Reading, shot a five under par 66 in the first round, which gave him a tie for the lead.  Aubrey couldn’t keep up the pace and finished in a tie for 18th at 281 and won a badly needed $40,320. The story of the week was Chris DiMarco who shot a 66 in the third Tround, which gave him a three-stroke lead going into the final round. DiMarco was playing his 159th tournament on the PGA Tour without a victory. On Sunday DiMarco (68-67-66-69) holed an eight-iron on the fly for an eagle two on the third and he was on the way. When he tapped in an eight-inch birdie putt on the 72nd hole he was the winner by six strokes. Scott Hoch, Brad Elder, Jonathan Kaye, Chris Perry and Mark Calcavecchia tied for second at 276. First prize was $576,000. Ted Tryba finished tied for 46th at 286 and won $9,600. Jim Furyk, Terry Hatch, Nick Napoleon, James Sullivan, Rick Osberg and Chris Anderson missed the cut. Tryba and Furyk were fully exempt players on the PGA Tour. Aubrey had a limited exemption. Hatch, Osberg and Anderson had qualified in the Section qualifying event. The host professional was Al Sutton. A spectator ticket for the week cost $90.  

Kelly, Brian (TGH)
Brian Kelly

The Philadelphia Section PGA Championship was played in the fourth week of September at the Burlington Country Club. The golf course had been recently redesigned and now measured 6,212 yards. After being $57,000 the year before the purse was back up to $100,000, where it had been for several years. Rob Shuey shot a five under par 65 in the first round to take a two-stroke lead over the host professional, Michael Mack. Tuesday’s round was washed out and when the second round was played on Wednesday the players were allowed to lift, clean and place their golf balls. Terry Hertzog took over the lead as he posted a 64 to go with his opening round of 68. That put him four strokes in front of the field. On Thursday Hertzog faltered some and the tournament became more tightly contested with several players having a chance to win. Brian Kelly and Hertzog were paired together in the final group and tied for the lead playing the last hole. Hertzog hit his second shot into the bunker in front of the green and Kelly’s second shot found the green but spun back into the front rough. Hertzog’s bunker shot finished behind the pin and Kelly’s chip shot stopped a foot below the hole. Hertzog (68, 64, 75—207) missed his downhill putt and Kelly (68, 68, 70–206) holed his for a par and the title. First prize was $15,000. Kelly had won the Section Championship in 1995 also. Mack ended up in third place with at 208. Shuey, Great Bay Country Club professional John Appleget and Rick Osberg tied for fourth with 209 totals. The Burlington Classic was not held that year. The tournament winner, Brian Kelly, was declared the Burlington Classic champion for 2000.

The first two rounds of the Philadelphia Section Championship, which were played on the fourth Monday and Wednesday at the Brandywine Country Club, counted as the Philadelphia Section Senior Championship for the senior professionals. Tuesday’s round was rained out. Wedgewood Golf Club professional Roger Stern won with rounds of 69 and 73 for a two-over-par total of 142. Jim Masserio and Ken Peyre-Ferry tied for second at 143. Pete Oakley finished fourth at 146. The victory qualified Stern for the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship.

The Eastern Club Professional Championship was played at the Osprey Point Golf Club, Kiawah Island, South Carolina in the first full week of October. This was the qualifying event for the Club Professional Championship, which was the club professional’s avenue to the PGA Championship. Jeff Lankford (70-69-67-73) won the tournament with a nine under par 279. Bryan Sullivan finished second at 280 and Bob Boyd was next at 281. Mark Brown and Mike Gilmore tied for fourth at 282. Terry Hatch tied for 14th at 288 and won $2,250. Just one stroke back, Greg Farrow tied for 17th at 289 and won $1,662. George Forster, Sr. finished 21st at 290 and won $1,500. Jason Lamp shot a 292 and tied for 25th, winning $1,275. Paul Oglesby finished tied for 31st at 294 and won $1,075. Hatch, Farrow, Forster, Lamp and Oglesby qualified for the CPC. Evan Belcher (296) tied for 41st and won $850. David Quinn (299) and Pete Oakley (299) each won $635 for a 54th place tie. Bob Fritz (302) tied for 68th and won $495. Vince Ramagli (304) finished 74th and won $450. First prize was $20,000. Ken Peyre-Ferry and Mike Moses missed the cut.  

On the second Thursday of October the Philadelphia PGA eked out a narrow victory over the Golf Association of Philadelphia amateurs at the Rolling Green Golf Club. Their slight success in the singles matches made the difference as the pros won six of the twelve matches and halved one. The George Forster, Sr.-Bill Sautter team won three points. The Terry Hertzog-Stu Ingraham team won 2-1/2 points. The senior team of Coatesville Country Club teaching pro Gary Benoit and Rolling Green teaching pro Frank Palumbo also won 2-1/2 points. The team of Vince Ramagli and Waynesborough Country Club assistant Dan Black won two points. The other members of the PGA team were Rick Osberg, Terry Hatch, David Quinn and John DiMarco. The final score was 10 points for the pros and 8 for the amateurs.  

In the second week of October the PGA Tour was in Las Vegas, Nevada for the Invensys Classic. Titleist had just introduced a new three-piece solid golf ball called the Pro V1. The secret to its success was that the harder it was struck the less it spun and when it was struck softly, like a pitch shot, it had spin. Thus, the drives carried farther and the approach shots bit and stopped. Earlier in 2000 only 20 percent of the players at the Las Vegas tournament had used solid balls but that week 64 percent of the field played with solid golf balls. Spalding had had a solid golf ball on the market since 1968 and Greg Norman had won the 1986 British Open with a solid ball, but Titleist had perfected it.

Ed Sabo won the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship at the Ibis Golf & Country Club, West Palm Beach, Florida. The tournament, which was played in mid October, was the qualifying event for the Senior PGA Championship. Pete Oakley was the defending champion and the Philadelphia Section pros made a very good showing. The year before Sabo, who had previously been a head professional in the Philadelphia Section, led by three strokes going into the final round only to shot a 76 and lose to Oakley by three strokes. This time Sabo (69-66-72-68—275) led by eight strokes going into the last round and won by 10 over Oakley (72-70-73-70—285), who finished second. Oakley won $11,000. Bill Schumaker (287) and Dick McLean (288) finished third and fourth. Jim Masserio tied for fifth at 289 and won $6,000. Ken Peyre-Ferry tied for ninth at 292 and won $3,500. By finishing in the top 35 Oakley, Masserio and Peyre-Ferry qualified for the Senior PGA Championship. The total purse was $185,000 and first prize was $14,000. Roger Stern missed the cut.

In the fourth week of October Rob Shuey won the Philadelphia PGA Match Play Championship at the Cape May National Golf Club. The tournament started on Monday morning with 64 players. They played two matches on Monday, two on Tuesday and two on Wednesday. The finals on Wednesday afternoon came down to a duel between Shuey and John Appleget. Shuey birdied three of the last four holes to get even with Appleget. From there they went to sudden-death, which Shuey won with a par on the third extra hole. In the semifinals Shuey eliminated Terry Hertzog 3&2. Appleget turned away Greg Farrow 5&4.  

In late October Evan Belcher (301) finished tied for 26th in the PGA Assistant Championship where he won $1,140. The tournament was played at the PGA Golf Club’s South Course in Port St. Lucie, Florida. Alan Schulte (69-69-73-71) won the $5,000 first prize by one stroke with a 282 total. Randy Cook (283) finished second. Mark Voeller and Murray Van Gundy tied for third at 285. The purse was $65,000.

Connelly, Jack 3
Jack Connelly

The PGA of America’s national meeting was held at the Charleston Place Hotel in Charleston, South Carolina during the second week of November. It was an election year and the Philadelphia Section’s Jack Connelly was elected president without opposition. He had just finished serving two years as the secretary and two years as the vice president. Fifty members from Connelly’s club, Huntingdon Valley Country Club, were in Charleston for the election. M.G. Orender was elected vice president and Roger Warren was elected secretary. Warren had lost to Orender in the election for secretary in 1998. When it came to making changes in the constitution very little was changed. District 14, which was comprised of two Sections rather than three like the other 13 Districts, was allowed to continue to be represented by a Director every other three-year term. Another change was that Apprentices working in a PGA office could earn up to 18 credits toward membership instead of only three. The delegates to the meeting were Michael Mack and Michael Cole, who was now the professional at the Center Square Golf Club. The Section was also represented by past national president Dick Smith, Sr. and eight alternate delegates.  

Poole, John 2 (TGH)
John Poole

The Section’s annual meeting was held at the Brandywine Country Club on the third Monday of November. It was not an election year as the officers were serving a two-year term. The Section had just completed another successful year with its “PGA Junior Tour”. The Section had held 42 junior tournaments with 686 boys and girls having entered at least one of the events. The Section now had a quarterly publication called “PHILLYPGA NEWS”. Pete Trenham was writing articles for the magazine on the Section’s history. The usual awards were presented at the meeting. The Philadelphia Section’s “PGA Golf Professional of the Year” was John Poole. When the Section’s first Club Relations committee was formed in 1978 Poole was asked to be a member. That is when Poole found his calling in the PGA. In late 1982 Poole was elected first vice president of the Section and he became the chairman of the Club Relations Committee. He was the chairman of the committee for more than fifteen years and a member of the committee for twenty-nine years. During that time Poole and his committee met with more than 150 golf facilities and had telephone conversations with more than 150 other clubs to advise them on the hiring of new head professionals. As a result of Poole’s efforts numerous head professional positions in the Philadelphia Section were upgraded. He was a member of the national club relations committee for over ten years. Poole was a six-time winner of the Bill Strausbaugh Award at the Section level and in 1993 he was the PGA of America’s recipient of the Bill Strausbaugh Award. He won the Section’s Horton Smith award for educating the Section members on employment and club relations. As a player Poole had a third and a fourth place finish in the Philadelphia Open and he qualified for the PGA Club Professional Championship two times, making the cut in 1977. As the head professional at the Chester Valley Country Club he hosted the PGA Senior Tour’s Bell Atlantic Senior Golf Classic for ten years. Poole was the Section’s 2nd vice president for three years. Rob Shuey was the “Player of the Year” and Greg Farrow won the DeBaufre Trophy with a scoring average of 71.13 strokes pre round. The Robert ‘Skee’ Riegel Senior Player of the Year” was Pete Oakley. The Section’s “Teacher of the Year” was Dave Seeman.

Connelly, Jack 2
Jack Connelly

The Section’s Presidential Gala was hosted by the Chester Valley Golf Club on the third Sunday of December. The black-tie affair honored all of the Section’s award winners for that year along with the two newest members of the Philadelphia Section’s Hall of Fame, Jack Connelly and Leo Diegel. Connelly grew up in Deptford, New Jersey and caddied at the Woodbury Country Club. In 1965 he began his professional career in golf working for Harry Obitz and Dick Farley on Long Island and in the Bahamas. After serving a two-year stint in the U.S. Army, which included a year in Vietnam he went back to work for Obitz and Farley, becoming a member of the famous “Swings the Thing” golf school and traveling show. Connelly came to the Philadelphia Section in 1971 as the assistant at the Montgomeryville Golf Club. With the financial assistance of some Woodbury C.C. members he played on the PGA Tour in 1972 and the next year he came back to Philadelphia as the assistant at the Huntingdon Valley Country Club. In 1975 he qualified for the U.S. Open where he made the cut and a year later he became the head professional at Huntingdon Valley. For three decades he was one of the leading players in the Philadelphia Section as he won numerous tournaments, which included the 1979 Philadelphia Open. Six times he finished second in the Philadelphia Section Championship. Connelly was the Section’s “Player of the Year” four times and he won the DeBaufre Trophy three times for having the lowest scoring average in the Section events. In 1979 he was elected to the Section’s office of secretary and served in that office four years. He was then vice president and tournament chairman for one year before being elected president two years. After being out of PGA politics for three years Connelly ran for the Section’s office of second vice president and was again back in harness. He served as secretary again in 1989 and he was first vice president and tournament chairman in 1990 and 1991. In 1993 Connelly ascended to the office of director in the PGA of America for District II, which was a three-year term. After completing his time on the PGA Board of Directors he decided to run for PGA office. At the PGA of America’s annual meeting in November of 1996 Connelly was elected to the office of secretary. He served as secretary for two years and vice president for two years. In November of 2000 he was elected the 32nd president of the PGA of America. While president of the PGA the “9/11” attacks occurred less than three weeks before the Ryder Cup was scheduled to be played in England. Because of all the security concerns involving high profile athletes and events the decision had to be made to postpone the matches until 2002. In 1988 Connelly was the Section’s “PGA Golf Professional of the Leo” and in 1995 he won the Horton Smith Award for his work in educating his fellow golf professionals.

Diegel, Leo 2 (TGH)
Leo Diegel

Leo Diegel grew up in Detroit, Michigan and learned to play golf as a caddy at the Detroit Golf Club under professional Alex Ross. At that time anyone who caddied or worked in a golf shop after the age of 16 was deemed to be a professional golfer. At the age of 17 Diegel was working for Ross as his assistant and that year, 1916, he won the Michigan Open, as Ross finished second. Three years later he won a second Michigan Open, this time by 19 strokes. In 1928 and 1929 he held the #1 ranking on the PGA Tour and he was ranked in the top ten every year from 1920 to 1934. He won consecutive PGA Championships (1928 and 1929) along with winning four Canadian Opens. On the way to winning the 1928 PGA Championship at Five Farms in Baltimore he defeated Walter Hagen in the quarterfinals. Up to then Hagen had won 22 straight 36-hole matches and the four previous PGA Championships. Hagen’s 1926 PGA Championship had come at the expense of Diegel as he defeated him in the finals. Diegel also finished second in both the U.S. Open and the British Open. Diegel won a total of 29 tournaments on the PGA Tour and he was second 23 times. He was a member of the first four Ryder Cup teams. Diegel arrived in the Philadelphia Section as the professional at the Philmont Country Club in late 1933 and stayed there through 1944. His national victories were behind him but he was a factor in the major championships for several more years. His first year at Philmont he finished second on the PGA Tour money list even though he only played in seven tournaments. Late that year he won two tournaments in Australia and tied for first in another one. Those wins didn’t figure in the PGA Tour money standings. Diegel was the PGA of America tournament chairman in 1934 and from 1944 to 1946 he was chairman of the PGA of America’s national rehabilitation program for wounded World War II veterans. As the tournament chairman of the Philadelphia Section in 1943 Diegel began using Section events to raise money for wartime charities. Out of that evolved a rehabilitation program for wounded veterans at the Valley Forge General Hospital near Phoenixville. By the time the war had ended Diegel had the Section’s rehabilitation program at five veterans’ hospitals in the Philadelphia Section and every PGA Section in the country was doing something to rehabilitate the wounded veterans. Diegel was inducted into the PGA of America Hall of Fame in 1955.

Ed Dougherty, who had won a tournament on the PGA Senior Tour that year, was also honored at the Presidential Gala with a Special Achievement Award.

For the second straight year Tiger Woods took home the top three honors on the PGA Tour. He won the Vardon Trophy with an average of 67.79 strokes per round, led in money won with $9,188,321 and he was PGA “Player of the Year”. Jim Furyk had another good year as he finished 17th on the PGA Tour money list with earnings of $1,940,519 in 25 tournaments. Ted Tryba lost his exemption as he finished outside the top 125 in 160th place. He won $249,437 in 37 tournaments. Emlyn Aubrey wasn’t fully exempt but he managed to play in 26 tournaments where he won $110,221, which put him in 189th place on the money list.

Larry Nelson led the PGA Senior Tour with $2,708,005 in earnings. Ed Dougherty kept his exemption with another solid year. He won $953,374 in 37 tournaments, which put him in 17th place on the money list. Jay Sigel finished 52nd on the money list as he played in 32 tournaments and won $362,707. Even though he wasn’t in the top 31 he was still exempt by being in the top 31 on the lifetime money list. Jim Masserio won $23,938 in two tournaments. Pete Oakley won $13,810 in two tournaments. Ken Peyre-Ferry won $4,834 in two tournaments. Dick Hendrickson, who had retired from the Senior Tour, won $784 in one event. Trenton Country Club professional Dennis Milne won $600 in one tournament.  

Joe Daley played in 22 events on the PGA Buy.com Tour and finished 23rd on the money list with earnings of $151,233. Rick Price won $21,696 in 19 tournaments and Greg Lesher won $16,155 in 26 tournaments. Emlyn Aubrey won $3,080 in two events. Terry Hatch played on one event winning $1,260 and Doylestown’s Travis Diebert, who was playing on the mini-tours, won $1,210 in one event.


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2001
New golf courses were opening at a record rate. For the past six years more than 400 golf courses had opened each year. The year 2000 had been a record with 524 new courses and there were 515 more under construction. There were now more than 17,000 facilities with nine-holes or more and 575 were in the Philadelphia Section. Another 1,073 golf courses were in the planning stage throughout the United States.

Jim Furyk started the year off by winning the first tournament on the PGA Tour schedule in the second week of January. It was the tournament of champions, which was named the Mercedes Championship. It was a small field of 33 players who had all won on the PGA Tour during 2000. The tournament was played on the par 73 Plantation Course in Kapalua, Hawaii. Furyk turned in four steady rounds of 69, 69, 69 and 67 for an eighteen under par 274. Rory Sabbatini finished second at 275. Ernie Els and Vijay Singe tied for third with 276s. The purse totaled $3,500,000 and first prize was $630,000.

Pete Oakley won the winter activities Senior Stroke Play Championship in the second week of January at Port St. Lucie, Florida. Oakley put together rounds of 70, 67 and 69 on the PGA Golf Club’s par 72 South Course. His 206 total earned him a five-stroke victory over Ed Sabo (211). Jerry Tucker (214) and Michael Zinni (215) finished third and fourth. Oakley won $1,500 for winning the championship and $1,000 for also winning the 50-54 year-old age group.

In the fourth week of January Terry Hatch won the winter activities Stroke Play Championship. The tournament was played on the PGA Golf Club’s par 72 North Course in Port St. Lucie, Florida. Hatch (215) saved par from a greenside bunker on the last hole to win by one stroke over Tim Hobby (216) and Chris Van Der Velde (216). Hatch’s rounds of 72, 71 and 72 earned him a $2,500 payday. Pete Oakley (217) finished in a three-way tie for fourth and won $1,317.  

Hatch, Terry 3 (TGH)
Terry Hatch

For the second time in two weeks Terry Hatch won a winter activities event in Port St. Lucie, Florida. The second win came in the Match Play Championship during the first week of February at the PGA Golf Club’s South Course. Hatch won seven matches to take the title. In the finals he won the last hole to defeat David Young one-down. In the semifinals Hatch eliminated former Section member Frank Dobbs 3 & 2. In the other semifinal match Terry Hertzog lost to Young by the same 3 & 2 margin. First prize was $4,000 from a total purse of $46,750. Hatch was just the fourth player to win both the stroke play and match play titles in the same winter season.

In the second week of March Lori Van Sickle became the Philadelphia Section’s first Certified Master Professional. What had been the PGA of America’s Master Professional classification had been changed to Certified Master Professional. To attain the new classification the person must be a PGA member for twelve years and become certified in four areas of expertise. To be certified in each one he or she had to study the material on each subject and then pass a test. Van Sickle didn’t take up golf until she was 21. Before that she had attended Ohio University on a softball scholarship and also played basketball. She turned pro in 1990 and went to work at the DuPont Country Club as an assistant to Dave Schueck. When Schueck left in 1995 for a new club in South Carolina Van Sickle became the head professional at DuPont. Van Sickle’s four areas of certification that she attained were teaching, tournament operations, golf operations and general management.

Mack, Michael (TGH)
Michael Mack

Section President Michael Mack presided over the spring meeting, which was held at the Country Club of Hershey on the first Monday of April. There were nearly 400 members and apprentices in attendance. The finance committee chairman, Leo DeGisi, who was the professional at the Medford Village Country Club, reported that as of December 31 the Section had net assets of $149,047. $60,000 of the Section’s income came from the Oldsmobile Scramble and the management of the Buy.com tournament qualifying rounds for the PGA Tour. $80,000 came from the national office. The main topic of discussion was several new electronic developments. The Section was now linked directly to the PGA of America office. There was now online registration available for tournaments, meetings and other events. The Section’s yearly directory that included the membership list, tournament entry blanks and information was online instead of being printed as in the past. It was announced that the Section championship was being hosted by the Spring Ford Country Club and their professional Tony DeGisi. The start up of a new television program called “Golf Shots” that was filmed in conjunction with the Philadelphia PGA and Comcast SportsNet was announced. The program involved members of the Section and their facilities. The Variety Club was now in its 25th year as the Section’s official charity. The Section’s award winners for 2001 were announced at the meeting. This was a change from the past 46 years when the award winners had always been announced at the fall meetings. The PGA of America had decided that the yearly award winners should be announced early in the year in order to give the national committee more time to determine the winners of the national awards. Due to that decision the award winners were now announced at the spring meeting. Don Lowe, who had been a head pro in the Harrisburg area for 20 years, was the Section’s “PGA Golf Professional of the Year”.

Lowe, Don (TGH)
Don Lowe

Don Lowe grew up in Toledo, Ohio and learned to play golf when he began to caddy at age ten. A stint in the United States Army brought him to central Pennsylvania. When he got out of the army he turned pro, working as the assistant at Riverview Country Club. One year later he was the head professional at the Blue Mountain Country Club, now called Golf Club @ Felicita, where he stayed 17 years. His passion was junior golfers and he never charged a junior for a golf lesson and he always found time to fit in a young golfer who needed a little extra help. Each year he had several dozen in his junior clinics and sometimes there were more than 100. Twelve of his juniors had become golf professionals. Now the pro at the Country Club of Harrisburg, Lowe was the Central Counties Chapter president from 1996 to 1999. He served the Section as a District Director for twelve years and he was on the membership committee for six years.

Tiger Woods won his fourth consecutive major title at the Masters Tournament in the first full week of April. His rounds of 70, 66, 68 and 68 over the Augusta National Golf Club’s course for a 16 under par 272 earned him the title over David Duval (274) by two strokes. Phil Mickelson finished third at 275. Mark Calcavecchia and Toshi Izawa tied for fourth with 278s. First prize was $1,008,000. Jim Furyk (279) tied for sixth and won $181,300. Furyk was in the tournament for having finished in the top sixteen at the 2000 Masters Tournament.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Central Pennsylvania was on the second Monday of May at the West Shore Country Club. Amateur Jim Fuller led with a four under par 68. Florida professional Michael Reese was next with a 70. Joe Daley, who was on the Buy.com Tour, picked up the third spot with a 71. The fourth and last place went to New Jersey professional Terry Slater, Jr. (72).  

On the third Tuesday of May local qualifying for the U.S. Open in the Philadelphia area was at the Kennett Square Golf & Country Club. There were 84 pros and amateurs competing for six places in the local qualifying round. Ryan Dillon, a mini-tour pro from Florida, was low with a five under par 66. Emlyn Aubrey, who was on the Buy.com Tour after eight years on the PGA Tour, holed out a nine-iron shot for an eagle two on the 14th hole. That helped him play the last five holes in four under par as he took the second spot with a 67. Chris Anderson played the first nine holes in 30 and won the third spot with a 68. The fourth spot went to Rick Osberg, who was now the director of golf at the Bellewood Golf Club, with a 69. The last two places were taken by Talamore @ Oak Terrace teaching professional John Spina (71) and Heidelberg Country Club professional Mark Anderson (71) but it took some last minute heroics to get it done. Spina holed a four-wood for a double eagle on the par five 16th hole and he birdied the par five 18th hole. To get his 71 Anderson holed an eight-foot putt for an eagle on the 18th hole.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in northeast Pennsylvania was at the Glenmaura National Golf Club on the third Thursday of May. Maryland professional Miguel Rivera was low with a three under par 69. John Pillar (71) and Canadian professional Brad Fritsch (71) tied second and third. There were three spots to qualify for.  

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in South Jersey was held at the Riverton Country Club on the third Friday of May. Centerton Golf Club owner/professional David Quinn and John Appleget, who was now the teaching professional at the Sand Barrens Golf Club, tied for medalist honors with two under par 69s. Appleget had to birdie four of the last six holes to tie Quinn. Little Mill Country Club professional George Frake and South Carolina professional Richard Massey picked up the third and fourth spots with 71s. Vince Ramagli (72), who was now the teaching pro at the Burlington Country Club, earned the fifth and last place in a two-man playoff with a par on the fourth extra hole.

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Ed Dougherty

Ed Dougherty won the TD Waterhouse Championship in Kansas City, Missouri during the third week of May. In the first round Dougherty birdied six of the first seven holes as he blistered the 6,927-yard Tiffany Greens Golf Course and Club with a ten under par 62. He never relinquished the lead. The second day Dougherty began his round with five straight birdies and posted a 66 to take a five-stroke lead into the final round. The next day he shot another 66 to win on the PGA Senior Tour for a second time. His total of 194 gave him an eight-stroke margin over former Section member Walter Morgan, Dana Quigley and Hugh Baiocchi who all finished in a tie for second at 202. First prize was $225,000 from a total purse of $1,250,000.

The PGA Tour Buy.com Steamtown Classic qualifying round for the Philadelphia Section was held on the fourth Tuesday of May at the Glenmaura National Golf Club. Lloyd Weston, who was teaching at Kramer’s Golf Practice Center, and David Quinn, who was now the professional and owner of the Centerton Golf Club, won the first two of the three allotted spots with one-under-par 69s. John Pillar posted an even par 70 and won a sudden death playoff for the third spot.

After having been played 18 straight years at the PGA National Golf Club in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida the Senior PGA Championship was moved to a new location and the name was changed. It was now the PGA Senior Championship and it was held at the Ridgewood Country Club in Paramus, New Jersey. The tournament even had new dates as it was played in the fourth week of May. The course was set up at 6,904 yards and played to a par of 72. Tom Watson approved of the new venue. Watson (274) posted rounds of 72, 69, 66 and 67 to win by one stroke over Jim Thorpe (275). Bob Gilder (277) finished third and Allen Doyle (278) ended up in fourth place. Ed Dougherty tied for 49th at 295 and won $4,543. Pete Oakley (298) won $3,913 as he tied for 61st and Ken Peyre-Ferry (299) won $3,838 for a 65th place tie. Jim Masserio missed the cut. First prize from the two million dollar purse was $360,000.  Dougherty was a fully exempt player on the PGA Senior Tour. Oakley, Peyre-Ferry and Masserio had qualified at the 2000 PGA Senior Club Professional Championship.

The Rittenhouse Trust Golf Classic was held at the Sunnybrook Golf Club on the fifth Tuesday of May. Each year first prize was being increased by $2,500 and it was now $20,000. The total purse was $43,500. Early in the day David Quinn birdied the first six holes and made a bogey on the 9th hole to shoot 31 on the front nine. On the back nine Quinn made nine straight pars and hung on to finish with a five under par 67. After posting his score Quinn was able to go home to New Jersey and follow the scores on the internet. There was a one hour rain delay for a severe thunderstorm and the last of the 159 players didn’t finish until it was nearly dark. As it turned out no one that had to complete their round after the rain delay broke par. Quinn didn’t have to return for a playoff as the score stood up all day, but he did return to accept the winner’s check. Jamie Komancheck (68) came within one stroke as he finished second alone. Dave Seeman, George Forster, Sr., John Appleget and Talamore @ Oak Terrace head professional Jim Smith, Jr. tied for third with 69s.  

The PGA’s Buy.com Tour’s Steamtown Classic was hosted by the Glenmaura National Golf Club for the second straight year. The tournament began on the last day of May and ended on the first Sunday in June. Jason Hill (272) put together a five under par 65 in the last round to win the tournament by three strokes. His first three rounds were 67, 71 and 69. Jonathon Byrd and Matt Peterson tied for second at 275. Tim Petrovic (276) finished fourth. Emlyn Aubrey (286) tied for 53rd and won $1,360. The host professional Cleve Coldwater (290) won $1,211 as he finished 63rd. Tom Carter, John Pillar, Rick Price, Joe Daley, Nick Napoleon, David Quinn and Lloyd Weston missed the cut. First prize was $76,500 from a purse of $425,000. Aubrey, Carter, Price and Napolean were on the Buy.com Tour. Daley was on the PGA Tour but he wasn’t in that week’s tournament so he played the Steamtown Classic. Coldwater had a sponsor invitation as the host professional. Pillar, Quinn and Weston had made it through the Philadelphia PGA Section qualifying.

The Burlington Classic was played at the Burlington Country Club during the first week of June. On Sunday two pros were paired with three amateurs for a pro-am. Pete Oakley put together two very good rounds of golf but he still only won by one shot. He shot a 68 on Sunday and a 67 on Monday to finish at five-under-par 135. Greg Farrow finished second at 136. George Forster, Sr., Jim Smith, Jr. and Philmont Country Club assistant Bob Kave tied for third with 137 totals.  

George Frake qualified for the U.S. Open on first Tuesday of June in Purchase, New York. The sectional qualifying event was held at the Century Country Club and Old Oaks Country Club. Tim Petrovic (138) led the qualifying for five spots with 67 at Old Oaks and a 71 Century. Frake shot a 71 in the morning at Old Oaks and in the afternoon he birdied the last hole at Century to finish with a 70. His 141 total earned him the fourth spot. Five players tied for the fifth spot at 142 and a playoff that lasted four holes determined that last spot. Jim Furyk was exempt from local and sectional qualifying.  

Terry Hatch won the two-day Variety Club Tournament of Champions at the Bellewood Golf Club. The tournament ended on the second Friday of June. The pros were paired with amateurs for a pro-am event the first day and the second day only the pros played. The course was set up shorter the first day in order to get all the teams done before dark. Hatch (141) shot a 69 the first day and came back with a 72 the second day to win by two strokes. Terry Hertzog finished second at 143 and John Spina was next at 144. John DiMarco, John Pillar and Chris Anderson tied for fourth with 145 totals.   

The PGA Buy.com Hershey Open qualifying for the Philadelphia Section members was on the second Wednesday of June. Terry Hertzog grabbed the first spot as he shot a seven under par 64, which was a course record for the Hershey Country Club’s East Course. Hertzog’s round was composed of seven birdies and eleven pars. Rob Shuey won the second place with a 70. Stuart Hanford (71) took the third and last spot by winning the first hole of a two-for-one sudden death playoff.

The U.S. Open was held at the Southern Hills Country Club in Tulsa, Oklahoma in the middle of June. The biggest news was that Tiger Woods didn’t win his fifth straight major championship. The first day’s play was interrupted by thunder storms and some players needed more than 24 hours to complete the round. One of those was Retief Goosen who posted a four under par 66. In round two Goosen turned in a solid round of 70, which put him in a tie for the lead with Mark Brooks who had shot a 64 that day. On Saturday Goosen scrambled to shoot a 69 and now he was tied for the lead with Stewart Cink. On Sunday Brooks found himself on the final green with a putt to take the lead and probably win the U.S. Open, but he three-putted from 20-feet. Goosen and Cink were playing in the final pairing, right behind Brooks. Cink hit his third shot over the green and Goosen stopped his ten-feet from the hole. Cink chipped back and being still away missed his putt for a par. Thinking that he had lost his chance to win, Cink hurried his next putt and missed. Goosen only needed two putts to win but he rolled his first putt three feet past the cup and then lipped out his downhill putt for a par and the win. Goosen’s 71 left him in a tie for first at 276 and an 18-hole playoff on Monday with Brooks. In the playoff Goosen made some early scrambling pars but by the time he was teeing off on #11 he had a five stroke lead. He made a few late bogies but he came to the last green again with two putts from ten feet to win. This time he holed the putt to finish with a 70 against a 72 for Brooks. First prize was $900,000 from a total purse of $5,000,000. Cink finished third alone at 277 and Rocco Mediate was next at 278. Jim Furyk (293) tied for 62nd and won $11,443. George Frake missed the cut and received $1,000. Furyk was exempt in several ways and Frake had passed both the local and sectional qualifying tests.

Jim Masserio and amateur Robin McCool, who was the Ping golf club salesman, qualified for the U.S. Senior Open on the third Friday of June. McCool toured the 6,494-yard Tavistock Country Club course in a two-under-par 70.  Masserio earned the second of the two available places with a 71. This was the second straight trip to the U.S. Senior Open for Masserio. Ed Dougherty was exempt for being in the top 30 on the PGA Senior Tour money list. Jay Sigel was exempt off being in the top 50 on the PGA Senior Tour all-time money list.

The PGA Club Professional Championship was held at the Crosswater Club in Sunriver, Oregon during the fourth June of June. Wayne DeFrancesco (278) put together rounds of 65, 69, 72 and 72 to take the title and the top prize of $40,000. Don Berry, Mark Brown, John Aber and Tim Thelen all tied for second with 281s. George Forster, Sr., (296) tied for 55th and won $1,230. The top 25 qualified for the PGA Championship. Evan Belcher, Terry Hatch and Paul Oglesby, who was now the teaching professional at the Merion Golf Club, missed the cut. The Philadelphia Section professionals had qualified at the 2000 PGA Eastern Club Professional Championship.  

The Izod Classic was played in the fourth week of June at the Golf Club @ Felicita. Vince Ramagli put together a pair of two under par 68s on Monday and Tuesday. His 136 total won by two strokes over John DiMarco (138). Stu Ingraham finished third at 141 and Lehigh Country Club assistant Lee McEntee was next at 142. A two-day two-man pro-am was held at the same time.

The U.S. Senior Open was played at the Salem Country Club in Peabody, Massachusetts in late June, and ended on the first day of July. Bruce Fleisher set a record by coming from four strokes off the lead at the end of the third round to win. He also set a record by winning USGA championships 33 years apart. Fleisher had won the U.S. Amateur in 1968. Fleisher’s (280) four rounds were 69, 71, 72 and 68. Gil Morgan and Isao Aoki tied for second at 281, just one stroke off the winning pace. Allen Doyle, Jack Nicklaus and Jim Colbert tied for fourth with 282s. Jay Sigel tied a tournament record for the lowest round when he posted a 64 in the third round. Sigel finished in a tie for 11th at 285 and won $$49,436. Ed Dougherty and Jim Masserio missed the cut. First prize was $430,000 and the purse totaled $2,400,000.

Open qualifying for the PGA Buy.com Hershey Open was at the Royal Oak Country Club on the first Monday of July. Passing the test were Terry Hatch, Bucks County’s Michael R. Brown, Former Penn State golfer Adam Decker and Travis Deibert. Three players shot 65 to lead the qualifying test. Brown, Deibert and Decker were playing the mini-tours along with trying to Monday qualify for the Buy.com tour.

The PGA Tour Buy.com Hershey Open was held on the Hershey Country Club’s par 71 East Course. The tournament concluded on the second Sunday of July with a sudden death playoff between John Rollins and Rod Pampling. In the last round Pampling (73-69-67-64=273) came from six strokes off the pace to tie Rollins (65-70-69-69=273), who had started one back. Rollins made a birdie 3 on the first playoff hole against a 4 for Pampling to pick up the $76,500 first place prize. Kelly Grunewald and Brad Klapprott tied for third at 275. Nick Napolean (284) tied for 34th and won $2,423. Joe Daley (289) won $1,519 for a 48th place tie. Adam Decker (290) tied for 50th and won $1,445. Emlyn Aubrey, Travis Deibert, Terry Hertzog, Michael R. Brown, Rob Shuey, Tom Carter, Terry Hatch, Greg Lesher, Peter “Chip” Richter and Stuart Hanford missed the cut. Daley, Napolean, Aubrey and Carter were regulars on the Buy.com Tour. Lesher and Carlisle Country Club professional Richter had exemptions from the sponsor. Decker, Deibert, Brown and Hatch had qualified on Monday. Hertzog, Shuey and Hanford qualified for the tournament at the Section’s qualifying event. The purse was $425,000 and the course measured 7,154. The host professional was Mike Battistelli.     

The New Jersey Open was played at the par 72 Upper Montclair Country Club in the second week of July. The Philadelphia Section was well represented again as George Frake (72-74-68–214) finished second to Chris Dachisen (72-72-69–213). Mike Lanzetta and Mike Burke tied for third with 215 totals. The defending champion, John DiMarco, (219) tied for ninth. The purse totaled $75,000 and first prize was $15,000. Frake took home a check for $7,500. The course measured 6,816 yards. The first round was rained out and the tournament was shortened to 54-holes.

Terry Hertzog won the Philadelphia Open on the third Wednesday of July. There was a 90 minute rain delay in the morning. Hertzog (137) toured the 6,786-yard Cedarbrook Country Club twice with rounds of 70 and 67. He saved the morning round with birdies on the last two holes. Hertzog didn’t have any stokes to spare as John Spina posted a 138 and public links amateur Michael Moffat turned in a seven under par 65 in the afternoon to finish at 138. Chris Anderson and Vince Ramagli tied for fourth with 139 totals. First prize was $3,900. Through qualifying rounds and exemptions there were 45 professionals and 15 amateurs in the starting field.

David Duval won the British Open on the fourth Sunday of July at the Royal Lytham & St. Annes Golf Club in Lytham St. Annes, England. He put together rounds of 69, 73, 65 and a last round 67 that held everyone off. Duval’s ten under par 274 won by three shots over Niclas Fasth (277). Darren Clarke, Ernie Els, Miguel Jimenez, Bernhard Langer, Billy Mayfair and Ian Woosnam finished in a six-way for third at 278. Jim Furyk missed the cut. He was in the tournament off having been in the top 30 money winners on the 2000 PGA Tour. After being exchanged from 600,000 pounds to dollars Duval’s first prize came to $858,000.

The Philadelphia PGA Assistant Championship was played on the last two days of July. The tournament was hosted by Seaview Country Club on its Pines Course and the Blue Heron Pines Golf Club’s East Course. The assistants played at Seaview on Monday and Blue Heron Pines on Tuesday. Bill Sautter (71-71) and Jamie Komancheck (74-68) were tied at the end of regulation play. They went into a sudden death playoff and Sautter won it with a birdie on the third extra hole. The win earned Sautter a berth in the national PGA Assistant Professional Championship. Spring Ford Country Club assistant Rich Steinmetz and John Appleget tied for third at 143. The tournament purse came to $10,000.

Qualifying for the Eastern PGA Club Professional Championship was held at the Medford Village Country Club in the second week of August. 58 Philadelphia Section members competed for nine places in the national tournament. Terry Hatch shot a 69 on Wednesday and came back with a 67 on Thursday. His eight under par 136 led the qualifying by four strokes. Greg Farrow (140), Stu Ingraham (142) and Paul Oglesby (143) finished second, third and fourth. Northampton Country Club professional Gary Hardin, George Frake and John Pillar tied for the next three places with 145s. Dave McNabb (146), Jim Masserio (146) and Pete Oakley (146) tied for the last two places. McNabb and Masserio won the sudden death playoff and Oakley became the first alternate. Farrow didn’t go to the tournament and he was replaced by Oakley. When Terry Hertzog won the Section Championship in September he also qualified for the CPC.   

The Pennsylvania Open was held in the middle of August at the par 70 Sunnehanna Country Club. There were 132 professionals and amateurs in the starting field and there was a cut after two rounds to the low 50 and ties. It took a score of 146 to make the cut. Harrisburg’s Jeff Daniels, who was now playing the professional mini-tours, made five birdies in the last round to come from three strokes behind and win the tournament. His (70, 69, 69) 208 score edged out former Pennsylvania open champion Brian Kelly (68-71-71–209) by one stroke. First prize from the $50,000 purse was $10,000. Rob Shuey, Lee McEntee and Rick Stimmel, a professional from western Pennsylvania, tied for third at 210. The course measured 6,718 yards.    

The PGA Senior Club Professional Championship qualifier was held at the Bellewood CC in the third week of August. Delcastle Golf Club teaching professional Harold Perry led the qualifying with a 72 on Thursday and a 70 on Friday. His two under par 140 won the first of the two open spots by one stroke. The other spot went to Dick Hendrickson (143) with rounds of 71 and 72. Pete Oakley was exempt as the winner of the 1999 Senior CPC and Jim Masserio was exempt off having finished fifth in the tournament in 2000. When Ken Peyre-Ferry won the Section Senior Championship in September he was in the tournament also.

The PGA Championship was held near Atlanta, Georgia at the Atlanta Athletic Club in the third week of August. After two rounds David Toms was tied for the lead with rounds of 66 and 65. In the third round Toms holed out a 243-yard five-wood for a hole-in-one on the 15th hole and finished the round with another 65, which kept him in a tie for the lead. In the final round Toms came to the last hole with a one-stroke lead. His drive ended up in light rough and with a 209 yard second shot over water remaining he chose to lay-up. He then played a lob-wedge to within twelve feet of the hole. After Phil Mickelson (266) missed his birdie putt from 25 feet Toms (265) holed his for a 69 and a one stroke victory. The fifteen under par 265 was a record score for all of the major championships. Also Toms’ ace was the longest in a major championship and it was the first time that the winner of a major had made an ace during the tournament. Steve Lowery finished third at 268. Mark Calcavecchia and Shingo Katayama tied for fourth with 270s. Jim Furyk, who was exempt for the tournament in several categories, tied for seventh at 274 and won $152,333. First prize from the $5,200,000 purse was $936,000. The course measured 7,213 yards.  

Greg Farrow won the Shawnee Open at the Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort in the third week of August. Farrow shot a 68 on Monday to trail the leader by two strokes and came back with a 67 on Tuesday. His nine under par score of 135 edged out Stu Ingraham (136) by one stroke. Vince Ramagli, Terry Hertzog and South Jersey Golf Center teaching professional Barry Dear tied for third with 138s. The course measured 6,800 yards.

The Whitford Classic was played at the Whitford Country Club in the second week of September. On Sunday the 84 pros played a pro-am along with the individual tournament. Two pros and two amateurs were in each pairing. Terry Hatch picked up another victory with a seven under par 137. Hatch put together a 69 on Sunday and came back with a 68 on Monday. As usual the golf course was set up easier on Sunday in order to get the large field of pros and amateurs around the golf course before dark. David Quinn finished second at 139.

Hertzog, Terry (TGH)
Terry Hatch

The Philadelphia Section PGA Championship was held at the Spring Ford Country Club in the third week of September. The Section senior champion was also decided during the Section Championship. Terry Hertzog put together rounds of 73, 68 and 72 to finish three strokes ahead of the field. He was the only player to break par for the 54 holes as his 213 total was three under par. David Quinn finished second at 216. Ken Peyre-Ferry, Paul Oglesby and John Pillar tied for third with 218 totals. Hertzog picked up a check for $15,000 from the $100,000 purse. There were 135 entries and the field was cut to the low 60 and ties after 36 holes. With a last round of 68 to go with his 74 and 76 in the first two rounds, Peyre-Ferry (218) captured the Section senior championship. Pete Oakley (220) was the second senior. Greg Farrow (222) finished third and Jim Masserio (223) finished fourth in the senior championship. By winning the senior title Peyre-Ferry qualified for the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship. The host professional was Tony DeGisi. The golf course measured 6,807 yards.     

The Philadelphia Section hosted the Eastern PGA Club Professional Championship at the Stone Harbor Golf Club in late September. This was the qualifying avenue for the PGA Club Professional Championship and then the PGA Championship. The top 36 players plus five who were already exempt qualified for the CPC. Tim Dunleavy (69-71-74-76) and Rick Hartmann (70-73-71-78) tied for the top spot at 290 and Dunleavy won the tournament in a sudden death playoff on the first extra hole. Hartmann made a double-bogey on the last hole against a bogey for Dunleavy to create the tie. Hartmann then made a bogey on the same hole to lose. The playoff was held on the 18th hole. Par was 288 and the 290 was the highest winning score in regional CPC history. The course measured 6,829, which wasn’t unduly long for 2001 but the course was tight and had many hazards. First prize was $20,000. Tom Sutter, Rob Labritz and John Hickson tied for third with 291s. John Pillar tied for 19th at 299 and won $1,575. Terry Hatch (300) tied for 21st and won $1,328.12. Stu Ingraham (302) won $1,062.50 as he tied for 30th and John Appleget (304) tied for 36th, winning $970. Pillar, Hatch, Ingraham and Appleget qualified for the CPC. Several players were exempt through their finish in the 1999 PGA Club Professional Championship so Appleget made it without a playoff. The players with 305 totals played off for the last spots. Paul Oglesby (307) made the cut and tied for 53rd and won $665. Dave McNabb, Jim Masserio, George Frake, Pete Oakley and Gary Hardin missed the cut. The prize money totaled $150,590.

The Philadelphia PGA defeated the Golf Association of Philadelphia in a challenge match for the tenth time in eleven years. The Whitemarsh Valley Country Club hosted the match on the third Friday of October. There were twelve players on each team and each team had at least two seniors on the team. The players were paired in fours and there was a four-ball match and two singles matches being played in each group. One point was awarded for each match. The team of Manufacturers Golf & Country Club professional Bob Hibschman and T’s Driving Range teaching professional Jay Friedman won its three points. The Chris Anderson-Dave Seeman team won 2-1/2 of the 3 points. The Dave Roberts-George Forster, Sr. team won 2 points. The team of Sunnybrook Country Club professional John Allen and Rich Steinmetz won 1 point. The Bill Sautter-Lloyd Weston team also won 1 point. The senior team of Don DeAngelis, who was now teaching at T’s Driving Range, and Gary Hardin won 1/2 point. For the second straight year the final tally was quite close as the PGA won 10 points versus 8 points for the amateur team.

In the third week of October Ed Sabo won the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship for the second straight year. The top 35 from a starting field of 144 earned entry into the 2002 Senior PGA Championship. The Philadelphia Section seniors made a good showing again. The tournament was played on the PGA Golf Club’s South Course in Port St. Lucie, Florida. Sabo’s thirteen under par 275 (72-65-69-69) total won by four strokes. John Traub and Jay Overton tied for second with 279 totals. James D. Mason and Drue Johnson tied for fourth at 280. Pete Oakley tied for 15th at 286, winning $2,700. Jim Masserio (288) tied for 25th and won $2,000. Harold Perry (289) tied for 28th and won $1,750. That qualified Oakley, Masserio and Perry for the 2002 PGA Senior Championship. Ken Peyre-Ferry (294) finished in a tie for 56th and won $890. Dick Hendrickson (298) tied for 71st and won $760.  The total purse was $102,500.

Greg Farrow won the New Jersey Senior Open Championship in October at the Spring Lake Golf Club. Farrow (140) put together a 68 and a 72 to win the $2,000 first prize by three strokes over Don Brigham (143). Russ Helwig finished third at 144. The total purse was $12,750.  

George Forster, Sr. won the Section’s Match Play Championship at the Cape May National Golf Club in the fourth week of October. There were six rounds of 18-hole matches. Two matches were played on Monday and two were played on Tuesday. The semi final matches were played on Wednesday morning and the final was later that day. Forster and Mike Moses met in the finals with Forster winning by the count of 3 & 2. In the semifinals Forster had eliminated Lee McEntee by 2 & 1 and Moses had defeated Pete Oakley 5 & 4. Forster had now won both the Section Stroke Play Championship and the Section Match Play Championship since his 40th birthday.

In the fourth week of October former Philadelphia Section member Frank Dobbs won the PGA Assistant Championship in Port St. Lucie, Florida. Dobbs, who was now working in Florida, holed a 20-foot birdie putt on the last green at the PGA Golf Club’s South Course to win out over the assistant champions from the 40 other PGA Sections. Dobbs’ (73-69-70-69) seven under par 281 edged out Alan Schulte (282) for the first place $5,000 check by one stroke. Todd Lancaster (286) finished third and Bradley Martin (288) finished fourth. Bill Sautter finished at 295 and tied for 10th, winning $1,575. The purse came to $65,000.  

Cole, Mike (TGH)
Michael Cole

The Section’s fall meeting was held at the Coatesville Country Club on the first Monday of November. Valley Country Club professional Clark Luis opened the meeting by singing our national anthem as he had been doing since the late 1970s. There were now 574 golf facilities in the Section and 356 were employing PGA members. 42 facilities were employing non-member head professionals who were in the PGA apprentice program and working toward membership. It was an election year and everyone that had been put up by the nominating committee was elected. The new president was Mike Cole. Kennett Square Golf & Country Club professional Tom Carpus moved up to vice president and Woodcrest Country Club professional Dick Smith, Jr. was the new secretary. Rob Shuey was now the director of tournaments and Silver Creek Country Club professional Jay Gallo was reelected director of section affairs. The Section members and apprentices were informed that the board of directors had elected Leo DeGisi as its National Director to represent District II. He would begin his term at the national meeting in November. The Section’s by-laws where changed to include a small piece of Maryland in District 2. The “Player of the Year” was Stu Ingraham. For the second straight year Greg Farrow won the DeBaufre Trophy with a scoring average of 70.8 strokes per round in the designated tournaments. Ken Peyre-Ferry was the Robert ‘Skee’ Riegel Senior Player of the Year”. It was announced at the meeting that Whitford Country Club Harry Hammond and Wilson Sporting Goods Vice President Joe Phillips were elected to the Section’s Hall of Fame. They were to be formally inducted in the spring of the next year. Section member JosephBud” Lewis had now been a PGA member for 70 years. Harold Evans, Paul Midiri and Henry Williams, Jr. had been PGA members for more than 60 years.  

The PGA of America’s national meeting was held at the PGA National Resort in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida during the second week of November. Jack Connelly was beginning his second year as national president. Due to the 9/11 attacks Connelly had had a very busy few months. Due to restricted travel and certain threats the Ryder Cup matches had been postponed for a year. In order to make that all work numerous other dates had to be shifted. Since the Ryder Cup had been shifted to even years the PGA Tour’s President’s Cup was moved to odd years. The PGA donated one million dollars to national relief efforts connected to the September 11 attacks. $520,000 of that money came from the Ryder Cup Team. The PGA Fall Expo trade show in Las Vegas was canceled. Leo DeGisi was sworn in as a director of the PGA of America for District II. Michael Cole and Tom Carpus were the Section’s delegates to the meeting. Dick Smith, Sr. attended as a past national president.

Jim Furyk played in 24 tournaments on the PGA Tour and was 13th with winnings of $2,540,734. Even though he wasn’t fully exempt Ted Tryba managed to get into 33 events and he won $308,049, which put him in 144th place. Tiger Woods was the “PGA Player of the Year” and he won the Vardon Trophy with an average of 68.81 strokes per round. He also led the tour with earnings of $5,687,777 even though he only played in 19 tournaments, which was less than anyone in the top five.

Allen Doyle led the PGA Senior Tour money list with $2,553,582. Ed Dougherty had another solid year as he moved up to 13th place on the money list with winnings of $1,338,818 in 36 tournaments. Jay Sigel was 37th on the list as he won $516,027 in 18 tournaments. Pete Oakley won $3,913 in one event. Ken Peyre-Ferry won $3,838 in one event. Dennis Milne won $1,148 in one tournament and Dick Hendrickson won $1,140 in one tournament.

Tom Carter won $149,576 in 25 tournaments on the PGA Buy.com Tour, which put him in 22nd place on the money list. Joe Daley was 55th on the list with earnings of $83,108 in 24 tournaments. Rick Price won $60,237 in 23 events and ended up in 70th place. Emlyn Aubrey won $28,761 in 23 events and ended up in 144th place. Nick Napolean won $20,575 in 21 tournaments, which was good for 136th place. James Sullivan won $2,975 in two tournaments. Cleve Coldwater won $1,211 in one tournament.

In 2000 no player on the PGA Tour, Senior PGA Tour, Buy.com Tour, LPGA Tour, PGA European Tour, Canadian Professional Golf Tour and Japan Golf Tour won a tournament with a wound golf ball. For the first time all the winners on those tours won while playing solid golf balls.  
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2002
The USGA announced that an amateur golfer could play in a qualifying tournament for a professional tour and not lose his amateur status as long as he waived his right to prize money. If the qualifying event took place during 2002 his amateur status would be automatically reinstated on January 1, 2003.

Carpus, Tom 6 (TGH)
Tom Carpus

The Philadelphia Section’s spring meeting was held at the Hershey Country Club on the first Monday of April. The main topic of discussion at the meeting was that in early November the Section was hosting the national PGA meeting in Philadelphia. Finance committee chairman, Leo DeGisi, reported that as of December 31 the Section had net assets of $171,079. An important portion of the meeting was the announcement of the award winners for 2002. The awards were being made in the spring instead of the fall as it had been done for many years. The change was made in order to give the Section’s winners more time to be reviewed by the national awards committee. The playing awards were still made at the fall meeting. A dinner for the award winners was held the night before the meeting at the Hershey Country Club. The Section now had 608 members and was the 11th largest of the 41 PGA Sections. The Section’s website address was http://www.phillypga.com. The Section’s “PGA Golf Professional of the Year”, Tom Carpus, graduated from Drexel University. Not long after that he turned pro and began his golf career as an assistant at the Rolling Green Golf Club. After that he worked in the Section office as its first full time tournament manager before becoming the head professional at the Greate Bay Country Club. Five years later he returned to Pennsylvania as the professional at the Kennett Square Golf & Country Club. While managing the wide array of tournaments for the Section Carpus made it his job to become an expert on the rules of golf. In 1995 Carpus had been made a member of the PGA of America Rules Committee. He officiated at numerous tournaments including the PGA Championship six times. In the first week of April 2002 he was one of seven members of the PGA Rules Committee that had been invited to serve on the rules committee at the Masters Tournament, which had ended just the day before the spring meeting. Inniscrone Golf Club teaching professional Eric MacCluen was the Section’s “Teacher of the Year” for 2001.  

Tiger Woods won the Masters Tournament in the first full week of April at the Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia. It was his third win at the Masters and his second straight. After rounds of 70, 69 and 66 Woods was tied for the lead with Retief Goosen. On Sunday only one player broke 70 and Woods (276) posted a 71 to win by three strokes. Goosen finished second at 279. Phil Mickelson (280) was third and Jose Maria Olazabal (281) finished fourth. Woods won $1,008,000. It was Arnold Palmer’s 48th and last Masters Tournament. Jim Furyk missed the cut. Furyk was invited for having finished in the top sixteen at the 2001 Masters Tournament.

In May Christopher Cain, the head professional at the Penn State University Golf Club, broke a Guinness World Record. On a day that began at 7:00 am and ended at 7:00 pm Cain broke the old record of 476 holes by completing 505 holes. Cain stuck to a tight group of five holes, which he played 101 times. With the aid of a golf cart he averaged about seven minutes for each five-hole loop. By playing the marathon Cain raised $35,000 for Penn State charities.     

The Laurel Creek Country Club hosted local qualifying for the U.S. Open in South Jersey on the second Thursday of May. Laurel Creek member Mark Walker led the qualifying with a four under par 67. High school senior Drew Andrews and another amateur, Sean Leonard, carded 68s to win the second and third spots. David Quinn and former St. Davids Golf Club assistant David West, who was a reinstated amateur, posted 69s and tied for fourth. Rich Steinmetz (70) won the sixth and last place on the third hole of a sudden death playoff with Laurel Creek assistant John DiMarco (70).  

Colonial Country Club hosted local qualifying for the U.S. Open in South Central Pennsylvania on the second Monday of May. Jeff Daniels led the qualifying for four spots with a two under par 69. Canadian professional Craig Marseilles won the second spot with a 70. There was a four-man playoff among the 71 cards for the last two spots. Mark Sheftic and amateur Jim Fuller secured those spots.    

Local qualifying in northeast Pennsylvania for the U.S. Open was held at the Williamsport Country Club on the second Tuesday of May. Four inches of rain fell on Sunday and Monday. On Tuesday the golfers were challenged by high winds and cool temperatures. Left-handed Canadian professional Drew Symons led the competition for two spots with a five under par 66. The other spot was won by amateur James Bohn III (72). He was the older brother of Lewisburg’s Jason Bohn, who was playing the professional golf mini-tours.

Hammond, Harry (TGH)
Harry Hammond

The 2001 Philadelphia PGA Hall of Fame induction ceremony took place at the Whitford Country Club on the third Sunday of May. The inductees were Whitford head professional Harry Hammond and Wilson Sporting Goods vice president Joe Phillips. Hammond had been a professional in the Philadelphia Section for 44 years and the head professional at the Whitford Country Club since 1969. For 33 years Hammond had run what was first the Whitford Pro-Am and later evolved into a two-day tournament. Hammond was elected Section secretary three times (1982, 1983 & 1984) and in 1985 he served as the Section’s 25th president. In 1992 he became a PGA Master Professional with the title of his thesis being “Computers for the Golf Shop”. Starting in the late 1970s Hammond played a major role in the Section’s junior golf clinics and golf camps. Through that and his involvement with the junior golfers at Whitford Hammond became interested in junior golf in the Philadelphia Section. In 1991 he became a member of the Section’s junior golf committee. Under Hammond the Section began a “Clubs for Kids” program, which donated used clubs to various junior programs and junior golfers. Hammond and his staff at Whitford were the “Clubs for Kids” program as they cut down and regriped several thousand clubs for junior golfers. He was a member of the Section’s junior golf committee for seventeen years and chairman of the committee for fourteen years. Hammond was influential in the formation of a Philadelphia Junior Golf Association that tied all of the junior programs together, including the “First Tee” program. Over the years Hammond helped raise thousands of dollars for junior golf in the Philadelphia region. The Golf Association of Philadelphia named one of its competitions for juniors, the Harry Hammond Award. Four times he won the Section’s Junior Golf Leader Award and in 1999 he was the PGA of America’s Junior Golf Leader Award recipient. In 1991 Hammond was the Section’s “PGA Golf Professional of the Year” and in 1996 he won the Bill Strausbaugh Award.

Phillips, Joe (TGH)
Joe Phillips

Joe Phillips was a longtime friend of the Philadelphia PGA and the PGA of America. Early in 1949 he went to work for the Wilson Sporting Goods Company at their distribution center in Philadelphia as a shipping clerk. The golf professionals would stop by the Wilson warehouse to pick up merchandise for their golf shops so it wasn’t long before the local golf professionals became acquainted with the likeable Phillips. When pros like Skee Riegel, Ken Gibson and Marty Lyons visited Wilson, Joe would listen to what they had to say about golf equipment and the business. In 1955 the Wilson Company sent Phillips out on the road as a progolf salesman. Riegel, who was a Wilson staff member, went with Joe to introduce him to the pros. Phillips was an instant success as Wilson’s salesman. He always wore a coat and tie when he called on the pros. He was happy and cheerful regardless of what size order you placed with him. Phillips always had several Philadelphia Section members on the Wilson staff; like Ted McKenzie, Henry McQuiston, Bob Ross and Bruce MacDonald who were paid along with receiving the usual equipment. When Tim DeBaufre went on the PGA Tour in 1962 Phillips signed him to a PGA Tour Wilson Advisory contract. In 1958 Phillips and Bob Jones formed the Philadelphia Pro Golf Salesmen’s Association. The salesmen showed their wares at the Philadelphia Section’s spring golf show each year along with helping with the tournaments as starters and scorers. Phillips quite often provided the spring golf show with Wilson staff members like Patty Berg and Sam Snead. In 1974 when the legendary Joe Wolfe retired Phillips was promoted to fill his place as Wilson’s Vice President of Golf Promotions. This meant moving to Chicago where Wilson was headquartered. Phillips was now responsible for signing and resigning tour players to represent Wilson. That also meant that he was the liaison between the tour player and the custom club department at Wilson. It was Phillips’s job to make sure that each staff member was totally satisfied with his or her Wilson equipment. Some of the many players that he signed and resigned for Wilson were Gene Sarazen, Sam Snead, Julius Boros, Hale Irwin, Tom Kite, Johnny Miller, Ben Crenshaw, Greg Norman, Patty Berg, Kathy Whitworth, Betsy Rawls and Juli Inkster. In the 1970s Phillips developed the most successful “Home Professional” staff program of its time by signing over 900 club professionals to contracts. Phillips not only discovered new talent for Wilson he also designed wedges for the company. With input from Wilson’s tour players and the help of Wilson’s custom designer Bob Mendralla he designed a set of wedges with “JP” stamped on the back. For many years Wilson had been known for having the best wedges in golf so it was quite an accomplishment to design several new wedge clubs that would be added to the Wilson line of clubs.  Phillips retired in 1989 but Wilson kept him on as a consultant. As a Wilson employee he had begun as a shipping clerk and retired as a vice president. In retirement he had an office at the National Golf Foundation in Palm Beach Gardens. Along with other duties he represented Wilson at all the major golf tournaments and the merchandise shows. Thanks to Joe Phillips, the Wilson Company was always one of the staunchest supporters of the PGA golf professionals and their tournaments. In 1997 Phillips received the PGA’s Ernie Sabayrac Award for lifetime contributions to the golf industry. Wilson created a Joe Phillips Award, which is awarded each year to an individual in its golf division for their commitment to the game of golf. Some of the winners have been Sam Snead, Patty Berg and Bob Ross. Phillips was just the second non-PGA member to be inducted into the Philadelphia Section Hall of Fame.

On the third Monday of May local qualifying for the U.S. Open was at the Berkleigh Country Club. There were 80 pros and amateurs competing at Berkleigh for six spots in the second stage of qualifying. Bob Fritz led the scoring with a two under par 70. George Forster, Sr. and Florida professional Greg Meyer picked up the second and third spots with 71s. Don Dimoff, who was now the professional at the Regents’ Glen Country Club, Berkleigh club champion Perry Landis and future Section member Sean O’Hair took the last three places with 72s.

The Section qualifying for the PGA Tour Buy.com Northeast Pennsylvania Classic was held at the Glenmaura National Golf Club on the third Thursday of May. Terry Hatch posted an even par 71 to take the first of three spots alloted to the Philadelphia Section. Lloyd Weston took the second spot with a 74 and Ramblewood Country Club teaching pro Bill Walker (75) won the third spot on the first hole of a three man for one spot playoff.

Philadelphia PGA Section qualifying for the PGA Tour Buy.com Tour Hershey Open was held on the third Tuesday May. Rob Shuey led qualifying for the three open spots with a one under par 71 on the Hershey Club’s East Course. Chesapeake Bay owner/professional Andy Barbin (73) and Peter “Chip” Richter (73) won the other two places in a three-man sudden death playoff.    

Jay Sigel won on the PGA Senior Tour at the Farmers Charity Classic in Ada, Michigan in the fourth week of May. Coming back from rotator-cuff surgery on both shoulders in 2001, it was Sigel’s first victory since 1998. He put together rounds of 67, 69 and 67 for a thirteen under par 203 at the Egypt Valley Country Club. His final round included two eagles, with the second one coming on the 17th hole. Morris Hatalsky finished second at 205. The win was worth $225,000. Rodger Davis finished third at 206. Jim Thorpe, Wayne Levi and Tom Wargo tied for fourth with 207 totals. The purse was $1,250,000.

At the same time Jay Sigel was winning in Michigan Jim Furyk was playing the last round at the Memorial Tournament in Dublin, Ohio. After earlier rounds of 71, 70 and 68 Furyk found himself on Muirfield Village Golf Club’s back nine with a chance to win. Furyk chipped in for a birdie on the 12th hole and then holed out a greenside bunker shot for an eagle on the 15th hole. He finished with a 65 and his fourteen under par 274 total won by two strokes. John Cook and David Peoples tied for second at 276. David Duval, Harrison Frazar, Vijay Singe, Bob Tway and Shigeki Maruyama tied for fourth with 277 scores. First prize from the $4.5 million purse came to $810,000. Furyk had now won at least one tournament for five straight years and he had won in seven out of the last eight years.

Dave Roberts set a course record at the Sunnybrook Golf Club on the way to winning the Rittenhouse Trust Golf Classic on the fourth Tuesday of May. Roberts put together an eight under par 64 to win the $22,500 first prize by six strokes. He was six under par on the par four holes. Lancaster Country Club professional Rick Gibson, Philmont Country Club professional Mickey Sokalski, Hershey’s Mill Country Club teaching pro Brian Lee and Roger Stern tied for second with 70s. Total purse was $51,700. There were 143 professionals and 16 amateurs in the field.   

The PGA Tour Buy.com NE Pennsylvania Classic was played at the Glenmaura National Golf Club and concluded on the first Sunday of June. A last round seven under par 64 propelled Gary Hallberg (69, 68, 74, and 64) to a three stroke victory. First prize from the $450,000 purse was $81,000. Roger Tambellini finished second at 278. Todd Barranger, Jeff Hart and Darron Stiles tied for third with 279 totals. Joe Daley tied for sixth at 280 and won $14,085. Emlyn Aubrey tied for 45th at 288 and won $1,654. Tom Carter tied for 54th at 290 and won $1,451. Terry Hatch (292) tied for 59th and won $1,372. John Pillar, the host professional Cleve Coldwater, Bill Walker and Lloyd Weston missed the cut. Daley, Aubrey and Carter were on the Buy.com Tour. Coldwater and Pillar had a sponsor exemption. Hatch, Walker and Weston qualified at the Section qualifier.  

Sectional qualifying for the U.S. Open was held on June 3 and 4 at various sites in the country but no one from the Philadelphia Section was able to qualify. Jim Furyk was exempt from both local and sectional qualifying off having been in the top 30 money winners on the PGA Tour in 2001.

U.S. Senior Open qualifying was at the Jericho National Golf Club on the first Friday of June. No one from the Philadelphia Section qualified. There were three spots to qualify for and four players ended up tied for the top spot at one under par 71. Former touring pro Peter Oosterhuis, Florida professional Dan Wood and North Jersey professional Rob Schaal prevailed in a sudden death playoff that lasted three holes. Ed Dougherty was exempt off having been in the top 30 money winners on the 2001 PGA Senior Tour and Jay Sigel was exempt for having finished among the top 25 at the 2001 U.S. Senior Open.

The Senior PGA Championship was played at the Firestone Country Club in Akron, Ohio. The tournament ended on the second Sunday of June. For the second straight year the senior professionals were competing for $2,000,000 in prize money. Fuzzy Zoeller managed to grab the $360,000 top prize by putting together rounds of 69, 71, 70 and 68. His two under par total of 278 won by two strokes over Hale Irwin (280) and Bobby Watkins (280). Roy Vucinich and Jim Thorpe tied for fourth with 281s. Ed Dougherty and Pete Oakley tied for 32nd with 290 totals. They each won $10,750. Jay Sigel (295) tied for 57th and won $4,100. Jim Masserio missed the cut. Dougherty was in the tournament off his position in the top 30 money winners on the PGA Senior Tour in 2001. Sigel was exempt for being on the top 30 life time money winners on the PGA Senior Tour. Oakley and Masserio had qualified by finishing in the top 35 at the 2001 PGA Senior Club Professional Championship.

The Variety Club Tournament of Champions was played at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club in the second week of June. Jim Masserio posted a five under par 67 on Tuesday and a 73 on Wednesday to win by three strokes. His 140 score earned a check for $6,500. On one broke par on the second day as the course was set up much more difficult and the players had to deal with a steady wind. The first day the pros played with amateurs in a pro-am so the course was made quite easy in order to get the large field around before dark. Blue Heron Pines Golf Club teaching pro John Appleget, Terry Hatch and Terry Hertzog tied for second at 143.

In the middle of June the U.S. Open was played at the Bethpage State Park’s Black Course in Farmingdale, Long Island, New York. The par 70 golf course had been spruced up and lengthened to 7,214 yards. Even though there was lots of rain and cool weather the course seemed to suit Tiger Woods. He shot rounds of 67, 68, 70 and 72 to win his eighth major championship. His 277 score earned him the title by three strokes over Phil Mickelson (280). Jeff Maggert finished third at 282 and Sergio Garcia was fourth at 283. Jim Furyk missed the cut and received a check for $1,000. First prize was $1,000,000. For the first time in its long history dating back to 1895 the U.S. Open started the players off #1 and #10 tees in the first two rounds.

The 35th PGA Club Professional Championship was played at the Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville, Kentucky during the fourth week of June. The course measured 7,030 yards. Barry Evans (70-70-66-75) won by two strokes with a seven under par 281. Standing on the 11th tee in the final round Evans owned a six stroke lead but he stumbled a little before finishing with three pars to sew it up. The victory earned Evans a spot on the PGA Cup Team, $47,000, six exemptions on the PGA Tour and entry into the PGA Championship. Mike Gilmore finished second at 283. Don Berry and Sean Farren tied for third with 284 totals. The top 25 qualified for the PGA Championship. Stu Ingraham (301) tied for 64th and won $1,300. Terry Hatch (306) finished in a tie for 77th, winning $1,030. John Appleget (309) finished 82nd and won $960. John Pillar missed the cut. The total purse was $350,000.   

The U.S. Senior Open was played in Baltimore, Maryland at the Caves Valley Golf Club during the last four days of June. Don Pooley (71-70-63-70) and Tom Watson (67-71-69-67) finished the 72 holes of regulation play tied at ten under par 274. Watson birdied six of his last ten holes to catch Pooley. Pooley’s 63 on Saturday was a tournament record. A three-hole playoff was held on holes 16 through 18 and the two pros each made three pars. Pooley and Watson then returned to the 18th tee for what was now a sudden death playoff. They halved the hole with birdies and returned to the 18th tee. On the fifth hole of the playoff Pooley prevailed over Watson with another birdie. It was Pooley’s first tournament as a senior and he was the first winner that had made it into the starting field through qualifying. First prize was $450,000 and the course was set up at 7,005 yards. Tom Kite (277) finished third. Ed Dougherty (278) ended up alone in fourth place and won $119,609. Jay Sigel tied for 21st at 287 and won $28,731. Dougherty was exempt off having been in the top 30 money winners on the 2001 PGA Senior Tour and Sigel was exempt for having finished among the top 25 at the 2001 U.S. Senior Open.

On the first two days of July the Philadelphia Section pros burned up the course at the Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort in the Shawnee Open. There were three nine-hole courses at Shawnee and the Red and Blue nines, which measured 6,800 yards, were used for the tournament. On Monday Rich Steinmetz shot a 69, but on Tuesday he put together a ten under par 62, which was a course record. Steinmetz’s round was composed of eight pars and ten birdies. He made five straight birdies on holes six through eleven and he birdied four of the last six holes as he ended the round by holing a 40-foot putt for a two on the last hole. Surprisingly his record score of 131 only won by four strokes. Pete Oakley finished second with a 135 score, which would have usually won the tournament by several strokes. Greg Farrow was another stroke back in third place with a 136 and John Pillar was next at 137. Ken Peyre-Ferry and John DiMarco tied for fifth with six under par 138s.

There were 190 players at the Dauphin Highlands Golf Club on the first Monday of July vying for fourteen places in the PGA Buy.com Tour Hershey Open. Dover, Delaware’s Chris Wisler, who was playing the mini-tours, was the co-medalist with a seven under par 65 on the 7,060 yard course. Washington’s Crossing mini-tour professional Jonathon Rusk posted a 67 and survived a seven-man playoff for one of the last six spots.

The PGA Tour Buy.com Hershey Open was held on the Hershey Country Club’s East Course in the first week of July. The tournament ended in a four-way tie. Cliff Kresge (67, 71, 71, 67), Brian Clarr (70, 67, 68, 71), Steve Ford (69, 68, 68, 71) and Joel Kribel (67, 68, 70, 71) all finished with eight under par 276 totals. In the sudden death playoff that followed Kresge won with a birdie on the third extra hole. First prize was $76,500 from a purse of $425,000. Tom Carter tied for 12th at 280 and won $9,775. Joe Daley finished in a tie for 23rd at 284 and won $3,392. Emlyn Aubrey tied for 46th at 287, winning $1,518. Jonathon Rusk made the cut but was disqualified. Chris Wisler, Jeff Daniels, Terry Hertzog, Peter Richter, Rob Shuey and Andy Barbin missed the cut. Carter, Daley and Aubrey were on the Buy.com Tour. Wisler and Rusk had qualified at the Monday qualifier. Hertzog and Daniels were in the tournament with exemptions from the tournament sponsor. Richter, Shuey and Barbin had qualified in the qualifying tournament for Section members. The host professional was Mike Battistelli.

Appleget, John 2 (TGH)
John Appleget

Pine Valley Golf Club hosted the Philadelphia Open on the third Monday of July. It was just the third time that an open tournament of some kind had been played at Pine Valley. The Philadelphia Open had been played at Pine Valley in 1923 and 1941. Many of the Section’s professionals had never had a chance to play the course. Pine Valley GC opened the course to the public for the day. Through qualifying and exemptions there were 45 professionals and 15 amateurs in the starting field. At the end of the day John Appleget (73-71) and John DiMarco (71-73) were tied at the top of the leader board with four over par 144s. An 18-hole playoff was scheduled for the next day. 1,900 spectators had turned out on Monday but the course was closed to the public on Tuesday. After five holes of the playoff DiMarco was leading by one stroke and putting for a birdie from ten feet above the cup on the sixth green. As DiMarco was addressing his ball it moved. He promptly called a penalty stroke on himself. No one else had seen the ball move. DiMarco then three-putted for a double bogie and went on to double-bogey the next hole. Appleget led the rest of the way. The final scores were 72 for Appleget versus 76 for DiMarco. First prize was $7,035 and second was $5,925. Due to a large number of entries for the qualifying rounds the purse and first prize was the largest in the history of the Philadelphia Open. Terry Hatch and amateur Chris Lange tied for third at 145. Rich Steinmetz (146) finished fifth. The golf course measured 6,699 yards.

The British Open, which was held in the third week of July at the Muirfield Golf Club in Gullane, Scotland ended in a four-way tie. Ernie Els (70-66-72-70), Thomas Levet (72-66-74-66), Steve Elkington (71-73-68-66) and Stuart Appleby (73-70-70-65) all posted six under par 278s. Ties at the British Open have were now being decided by a four-hole playoff. In the playoff Els and Levet tied at even par while Elkington and Appleby were both one over par and eliminated. The playoff then went to sudden death and Els won with a par. First prize was $1,106,140. Jim Furyk missed the cut. He was in the field off having been in the top 30 money winners on the 2001 PGA Tour.    

Rob Shuey won the two-day Burlington Classic at the Burlington Country Club in the last part of July. On Sunday two golf professionals were paired with three amateurs in a pro-am. After the first round Shuey trailed by one stroke with a 67. The second day the course was set up more difficult so even though Shuey took three more strokes and posted a 70 his three-under-par 137 won by one stroke. The host professional Michael Mack and Ken Peyre-Ferry tied for second at 138. Rich Steinmetz finished fourth at 140.

On the fifth Monday of July four Philadelphia Section assistant professionals played 108 holes for charity. Jamie Komancheck (Aronimink Golf Club), Pete Kowalinski (Pine Valley Golf Club), Sean O’Connor (Merion Golf Club) and Dave Seeman (Wilmington Country Club) comprised the foursome. The whole day was quite unique as the marathon took place on six different golf courses. They began the day at the Plainfield Country Club in northern New Jersey just after 5:30 a.m. After a round that took 93 minutes they moved on to the Baltusrol Golf Club for their second round. After that they toured Pine Valley Golf Club, Aronimink Golf Club and Merion Golf Club. The day ended at the Wilmington Country Club at 8:39 p.m., with the four assistants having traveled more than 200 miles. They achieved this feat by playing alternate strokes all the way. While one player was hitting the tee shot the others would be stationed further along the hole waiting to play the second, third, fourth or whatever shots were needed to complete the hole. Through the playing of the marathon they raised $15,000 for four charities.             

The Pennsylvania Open was held in the second week of July. The tournament was played at the Lancaster Country Club and Terry Hertzog, who had worked there as an assistant pro, won the tournament. Hertzog opened the tournament on Monday with a six over par 76. He came back the next day with a 68 but he still trailed the leader by six strokes. Hertzog posted another 68 in the last round but he thought that his 212 score was only good enough for a second place finish. When the leader, John Mazza, stumbled in with bogies on the last three holes he fell into a tie for first with Hertzog. The two professionals returned to the 18th tee for a sudden death playoff. Hertzog played the hole in regulation with two shots and two putts for a par against a five for Mazza to sew up the title and a check for $10,000. Brian Kelly missed the playoff by one shot as he finished at 213. John Spina (214) and Western Pennsylvania professional Kevin Shields (214) tied for fourth. The purse was again $50,000.     

The son of a PGA professional, Rich Beem, edged out Tiger Woods by one stroke at the PGA Championship in the third week of August. Beem (278) toured the Hazeltine Country Club at Chaska, Minnesota with rounds of 72, 66, 72 and 68. Woods (279) shot a five under par 67 in the last round but Beem was able to hold him off. First prize was $990,000. Chris Riley finished third at 283. Fred Funk and Justin Leonard tied for fourth with 284 totals. Jim Furyk finished ninth at even par 288 and won $149,000. Furyk was in the tournament off his place on the 2001 money list.

The Waynesborough Country Club hosted the PGA Tour SEI Pennsylvania Classic qualifying round for the Section members on fourth Friday of August. Two spots in the starting field were up for grabs. Forty-six Philadelphia Section members were entered in the qualifying round. Barry Dear stepped up with birdies on the last three holes to take the first spot with a three under par 68. Terry Hatch earned the other spot with a 70. Stu Ingraham was given a sponsor’s exemption.

Roberts, Dave 2 (TGH)
Dave Roberts

For the second straight year the Spring Ford Country Club hosted the Philadelphia Section Championship. The tournament was played in the last week of August. The tournament was also the qualifying event for the Eastern Club Professional Championship. Dave Roberts capped off his best competitive year by winning the tournament with rounds of 72, 68 and 71. Roberts walked on the last green with a one stroke lead and he two putted from three feet to win. His five under par 211 edged out Pitman Golf Club professional Orist Wells (212) by one stroke. John Appleget, Pete Oakley and Terry Hatch tied for third at 214. Roberts took away a check for $13,750 from a purse of $90,000. The victory earned Roberts an invitation to the SEI Pennsylvania Classic in September. The host professional was Tony DeGisi. As a result of combining the Eastern Club Professional qualifying with the Section Championship the number of spots allotted to the Philadelphia Section had doubled from 9 to 18. The allotted spots were based on the number of entries. Several senior pros were among the first 18 but they either were not eligible as “Life Members” of the PGA or choose not to enter. Roberts earned the first spot and Wells took the second one. The third, fourth and fifth places went to Oakley, Appleget and Terry Hatch. Paul Oglesby (215) picked up the sixth spot. The next three places went to John Spina (216), Rob Shuey (216) and David Quinn (216). Places ten through twelve were taken by John DiMarco (217), Stu Ingraham (217) and Brian Kelly (217). Vince Ramagli (218) and Jimmy Booros (218) won the thirteenth and fourteenth places. John Pillar (219) won the fifteenth place. The sixteenth spot went to Talamore @ Oak Terrace assistant Heath Davidson (220). George Forster, Sr. (221) and Chester Valley Golf Club assistant Jonathan Doctor (221) won a five-man playoff for the last two places.  

John DiMarco won the Whitford Classic at the Whitford Country Club in the second week of September. DiMarco’s two-day (70-67) seven under par 137 nipped Paul Oglesby (138) by one stroke. Cavaliers Country Club assistant Mark Parisi and Ken Peyre-Ferry tied for third at 139. In Sunday’s first round two pros and two amateurs were paired in a two-best-balls-of-four tournament. Because of the pro-am the course was set up quite a bit easier on Sunday than Monday.

Open qualifying for the PGA Tour’s SEI Pennsylvania Classic was at the Bellewood Golf Club on the second Monday of September. Forty-three players paid $400 apiece for the opportunity to win one of four open spots. Dover, Delaware mini-tour professional Chris Gray teed off in the first pairing of the day and set the pace with a three under par 68. Marlton, New Jersey mini-tour professional Michael Hyland posted a 71 and then won the fourth and last spot on the first hole of a sudden death playoff.    

Dan Forsman holed a 22-foot putt for an eagle on the Waynesborough Country Club’s 18th hole to win the PGA Tour SEI Pennsylvania Classic. It had been ten years since Forsman had won on the PGA Tour. It came just in time as the victory saved him from having to return to qualifying school. The tournament was played in the middle of September. Forsman’s (73-68-64-65) fourteen under par 270 edged out Robert Allenby (271) and Billy Andrade (271) by one stroke. John Houston (272) finished fourth. Jim Furyk tied for 24th at 279 and won $26,114. Stu Ingraham (292) finished 75th and won $6,270. For the week Ingraham was eighth in driving distance with an average of 292.8 yards. Terry Hatch, Michael Hyland, Barry Dear, Chris Gray and Dave Roberts missed the cut. First prize was $594,000 out of a $3.3 million purse. The host professional was Al Sutton.

Due to the 2001 terrorist attacks on New York the Ryder Cup matches had been postponed for one year. When the matches were played they were at Sutton, England on The Belfrey’s Brabazon Course in late September. The American team that had been selected to play for the cup in 2001 remained intact for 2002. Jim Furyk was a member of the team for the third straight time. The PGA of America and the European PGA teams were composed of twelve men on each team. On day one there were 4 four-ball matches in the morning and 4 foursomes matches in the afternoon. On day two there were 4 foursomes matches in the morning and 4 four-ball matches in the afternoon. At the end of the two days the teams were tied with eight points each. On day three there were twelve singles matches. The Europeans overwhelmed the Americans in the singles by 7-1/2 to 4-1/2 to win the cup. The final score was Europeans 15-1/2 and Americans 12-1/2. Furyk played in all five rounds winning 2 points and losing 3.

The Philadelphia Section Senior Championship was held at the North Hills Country Club in the fourth week of September. Qualifying for the Senior Club Professional Championship was held at the same time. The Section had been allotted eight places in the Senior CPC. After shooting a 73 on Tuesday Ken Peyre-Ferry trailed the leaders by three shots but he came back on Wednesday to capture the title with a 68, which was the low round of the tournament. Peyre-Ferry’s one under par 141 edged out Roger Stern (142), Jim Masserio (142) and Don DeAngelis (142), who was now the teaching pro at the Island Green Country Club, by one stroke. Peyre-Ferry, Stern, Masserio and DeAngelis took the first four spots. Jimmy Booros (144), who was now the teaching pro at the Green Pond Golf Club, won the fifth spot and Medford Lakes Country Club professional Dan Haskell (146) picked up the sixth place. The last two places went to Dick Hendrickson (147) and Jack Eckenrode (147). Pete Oakley was exempt as a former winner of the Senior CPC.

The Eastern PGA Club Professional Championship played on the Turning Stone Casino’s Shenendoah Golf Club in late September. The Philadelphia Section made a strong showing. Rick Hartmann (209) won by one stroke with rounds of 68, 69 and 72. Friday’s round was rained out and the tournament was shortened to 54 holes. Tom Sipula finished second at 210 and John Stone was third at 211. Gary Sciorra, Mike Gilmore and John Hickson tied for fourth at 212. First prize from the $150,000 purse was $20,000. Terry Hatch tied for seventh at 213 and won $5,000. John Pillar tied for tenth at 214 and won $3,750. Rob Shuey finished at 216 and tied for 17th, winning $1,700. John DiMarco (219) and John Appleget (219) tied for 23rd and they each won $1,197.72. David Quinn (220) tied for 34th and won $960.71. The top 35 qualified for the PGA Club Professional Championship and Quinn won one of last two spots in a seven-man sudden death playoff. Stu Ingraham (221) tied for 41st and won $830. George Forster, Sr. (222), Dave Roberts (222) and Paul Oglesby (222) tied for 47th and each won $702.50. John Spina (223) and Pete Oakley (223) tied for 55th and each won $625. Jonathon Doctor (224) and Jimmy Booros (224) tied for 61st and each won $580. Heath Davidson, Brian Kelly, Paul Oglesby, Vince Ramagli, and Orist Wells missed the cut. The prize money totaled $152,250.

The Philadelphia PGA Assistant Championship was played at the Heidelberg Country Club on the last Monday of September and the first Tuesday of October. On Monday Rich Steinmetz was the only one that bettered the par of 70 as he shot a blistering 65. On Tuesday he was around in 70 strokes and his 135 score won by three strokes. Dave Seeman finished second at 138 and Brian Lee (142) finished third. Colonial Country Club assistant Rick Gibney, Jamie Komancheck and Bill Sautter tied for fourth with 143s. The win qualified Steinmetz for the national assistant championship in Florida.

The Philadelphia Section PGA and the Golf Association of Philadelphia played a challenge match on the second Tuesday of October at the Woodcrest Country Club. It was the twelfth match between the two organizations and this one ended in a tie for the first time. Each team was made up of 12 players and two had to be seniors. The players were paired in fours with two singles matches and a better-ball match being contested in each pairing. Each match was worth one point and ties were not played off. The senior team of Pete Oakley-Don DeAngelis won all three of its points. The George Frake-Mike Moses team won 2-1/2 points and the Rob Shuey-Michael Mack team won 2 points. The Ken Peyre-Ferry-John Spina team won 1-1/2 points. The final tally was 9 points for the PGA and 9 points for the GAP. Dave Roberts, George Forster, Sr., Dave McNabb and John Allen were also on the PGA team. The PGA now led the series of matches with 10 wins, one loss and a tie.

Dave Seeman won the Philadelphia Section Match Play Championship at the Concord Country Club in the third week of October. There were 53 entries, so in order to fill out the 64-man match play ladder the top eleven players on the Section’s point list were given byes in the first round. Seeman, who didn’t have a first round bye had to win six 18-hole matches. Seeman wrapped up the title by defeating Pete Oakley in the Wednesday afternoon finals. In the semifinals on Wednesday morning Seeman took out Vince Ramagli and Oakley eliminated David Quinn.    

The PGA Senior Club Professional Championship was held in the third week of October at Port St. Lucie, Florida. The tournament was played on the PGA Golf Club’s par 72 South Course. Mike San Filippo (71-66-75-68) and Bob Ralston (67-73-68-72) finished the 72 holes of regulation play tied at 280. San Filippo made a birdie on the third hole of a sudden death playoff to capture the title and a check for $16,000. Jim Masserio just missed being part of the playoff as he and Gary Sowinski tied for third at 281. Masserio won $9,250. Pete Oakley tied for 23rd at 289 and won $1,955.55. By finishing in the top 35 Masserio and Oakley qualified for the 2003 PGA Senior Championship, which was going to be played at the Aronimink Golf Club where Masserio was the head professional. Jimmy Booros and Roger Stern tied for 37th at 291 and they each won $1,275. Don DeAngelis, Ken Peyre-Ferry, Dick Hendrickson, Dan Haskell and Jack Eckenrode missed the cut.

The PGA Assistant Championship was held at the PGA Golf Club’s South Course in Port St. Lucie, Florida in the fourth week of October. Kyle Flinton (271) won going away with rounds of 68, 73, 63 and 67. He won by seven strokes over Gus Ulrich (278) who finished second. Victor Trolio and Alan Schulte tied for third another five strokes back at 283. Rich Steinmetz finished eighth at 287 and won $1,700. All of the assistant champions from the 41 PGA Sections were in the field. First prize was $5,000 out of a purse of $65,000.

Jack Connelly was completing his term as president of the PGA of America. The PGA’s annual meeting was held in Philadelphia at the Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel. The meeting began on October 27 and ended on the second of November. Dick Smith, Jr. chaired the Section’s committee for hosting the meeting. All of the Section’s officers and staff were in attendance. The Section’s official delegates were Michael Cole and Tom Carpus. It was an election year and M.G. Orender moved into the office of president without opposition. Roger Warren was the new vice president and Brian Whitcomb was elected secretary. Nine resolutions were passed which included expanding employment opportunities for PGA members and apprentices. Also representing the Philadelphia Section as voting delegates were past national president Dick Smith, Sr. and national director for District II Leo DeGisi.

The Philadelphia Section’s fall meeting was held at the Coatesville Country Club on the third Monday of November. The President, Mike Cole, gave the members and apprentices in attendance a report on the national meeting that had been hosted in Philadelphia by the Section. He also reported that the Section now had $150,000 in its Reserve Fund. A report on the PGA Junior Tour was presented at the meeting. There had been a total of 40 events and 640 juniors had participated in at least one event, with 215 winning a prize. E-mail was becoming more important and the Section office now had an e-mail address on file for 70 percent of its members. The Section website was http://www.phillypga.com. Since the spring meeting Geoffrey Surrette had been hired as the new tournament director. Surrette was a PGA member and had been working as the head professional at the Ed Oliver Golf Course. The Section officers had all just completed the first year of their two year terms. The Section’s “Player of the Year” was Rob Shuey and Paul Oglesby won the DeBaufre Trophy with a 70.9 average per round in the designated events. Ken Peyre-Ferry was the Robert ‘Skee’ Riegel Senior Player of the Year”.

Qualifying for the PGA Tour was held at PGA West, LaQuinta, California in the second week of December. Terry Hatch (433), Rick Price (434) and future Section professional Steve Scott (438) earned conditional status on the PGA Tour’s Nationwide Tour. Hatch, Price and Scott had had to successfully make it through Stage One and Stage Two qualifying schools. It took a score of 424 for the six rounds to qualify for the PGA Tour and a score of 430 to earn full status on the Nationwide Tour.

For a fourth straight year Tiger Woods led the PGA Tour money list with $6,912,625, won the Vardon Trophy with an average of 68.56 strokes per round and was the “PGA Player of the Year”. Jim Furyk was fourteenth on the PGA Tour money list as he won $2,363,250 in 25 tournaments. Ted Tryba played in just nine events and won $17,706.

Hale Irwin led the PGA Senior Tour money list for a third time as he won $3,028,304. Ed Dougherty turned in another good year as he won $896,843 in 34 tournaments. That kept him fully exempt as he finished in 22nd place on the money list. Jay Sigel wasn’t far behind as ended up in 24th place with winnings of $843,526 in 30 tournaments. The top 31 money winners from the previous year were exempt. Pete Oakley played in one tournament and won $10,750. Dennis Milne played in one tournament and won $1,410. Dick Hendrickson entered one event and won $1,320.

Emlyn Aubrey finished 31st on the PGA Buy.com Tour money list as he won $126,169 in 21 tournaments. Tom Carter won $104,997 in 28 events and finished 43rd. Joe Daley won $71,781 in 26 tournaments, which put him in 64th place. Chris Wisler won $15,452 in seven events. Ted Tryba won $12,648 in five events. Lewisburg’s Jason Bohn won $2,745 in one tournament. Terry Hatch won $1,373 in one tournament.


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2003
As of January 1st a COR (coefficient of restitution) or spring-like effect for drivers was limited to .830 by the USGA and the R&A. All of the major golf tours in the world agreed to abide by the ruling. Recreational golfers could continue to post scores for handicaps while using drivers with a COR of .860 until January 1, 2008.

In the second week of January Pete Oakley won the winter Senior Stroke Play Championship. The tournament was held in Port St. Lucie, Florida on the PGA Golf Club’s North Course. Oakley (70-71-72) Tommy Price and Dan Fabian tied for first with 213 totals. Oakley won a sudden death playoff on the third extra hole. Oakley won $1,500 for winning the championship and another $2,050 for winning his 50-54 year-old age group.

Barbin, Harry 4 (TGH)
Harry Barbin

The Section’s spring meeting was at the Philmont Country Club on the first Monday of April. There were more than 300 Section members, apprentices and staff in attendance. The main topic of discussion was that the Section was hosting the PGA Senior Championship at the Aronimink Golf Club in June. National PGA director Leo DeGisi spoke to the group on the importance of growing the game of golf by finding ways to increase rounds played. Those in attendance were informed about a new Section radio show that would be carried by three local ESPN radio stations. There were the usual awards. Harry Barbin was the Section’s “PGA Golf Professional of the Year”. The co-owner of the Horsham Valley Golf Club, Barbin had been a Section member since 1979. Barbin had served the Section as a District Director for several years. He was also a part owner of two golf courses in Maryland. Barbin had served the Section as a member of a number of committees like tournament, club relations, junior, special awards and membership. His main interest was junior golf. Two high school golf teams had the use of his Horsham Valley course for practice and matches without charge. In 2001 he was honored as the Section’s Junior Golf Leader. Later in the meeting Barbin presented a $4,000 check to the Section’s Junior Golf Foundation from the Delaware Valley Junior Golf Foundation. The day’s golf event was canceled due to snow. Dom DiJulia was the Section’s “Teacher of the Year” for 2002. DiJulia was the owner of the Dom DiJulia School of Golf, which was located on the practice range at the Jericho National Golf Club.  

Mike Weir won the Masters Tournament in the second week of April at the Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia. Weir was the first Canadian and the first left-handed golfer to win the Masters. He was also the first Canadian to win a major. At the end of regulation Weir (70-68-75-68) and Len Mattiace (73-74-69-65) were tied at seven under par 281. A sudden death playoff began on the 10th tee and Weir won with a bogey five. First prize was $1,080,000. Phil Mickelson finished third at 283 and Jim Furyk was next at 284. Furyk won $280,000 for his fourth place finish. He was in the field for having finished in the top 30 money winners on the 2002 PGA Tour money list.

Qualifying for the PGA Nationwide Tour Northeast Pennsylvania Classic for Philadelphia Section members was on the third Tuesday of May. The Section had three spots to qualify for. The qualifying was held at the Glenmaura National Golf Club where the tournament would be played in June. Jericho National Golf Club assistant Chris Bartolacci, Dave Roberts, Dave Quinn and Barry Dear all tied at one over par 72. Dear came out on the short end of a sudden death playoff and became the first alternate.   

On the second Thursday of May local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held in the Philadelphia area at the Llanerch Country Club. The USGA had allotted six places at Llanerch. Dave Roberts, Llanerch member Michael McDermott and amateur Rich Pruchnik won the first three places with two under par 69s. Maryland professional Miguel Rivera took the fourth spot with a 70 and Sean O’Hair who was a mini-tour pro from Florida earned the fifth place with a 71. Dave McNabb (72) holed a five-foot putt for a birdie on the first hole of sudden death to win a five-man playoff for the sixth and last place.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in South Jersey was on the second Monday of May at the Woodcrest Country Club. The USGA had allotted five spots to that site. Terry Hertzog led the field with an even par 71 and the host professional, Dick Smith, Jr., was next with a 72. Michael Hyland picked up the next spot with a 73. There was a six-way tie at 74 for the last two places. The survivors of the sudden death playoff for those last two spots were Barry Dear and North Hills Country Club assistant Michael R. Brown. Dear birdied the first hole to win the fourth place and Brown birdied the second hole to win the fifth and last spot.  

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Central Pennsylvania was held at the Blue Ridge Country Club on the second Monday of May. There were three spots available at Blue Ridge. Amateur Jay Woodson was low with a 73. Peter Richter and Sunnybrook Golf Club assistant Mark Sheftic took the other two places with 74s, but they had to win a three-man sudden death playoff in order to move on to the sectional qualifying round. Par was 72 and the course measured 6,880 yards.

Sigel, Jay 2 (TGH)
Jay Sigel

Jay Sigel won the Bayer Advantage Celebrity Pro-Am in Parkville, Missouri on the third Sunday of May. Sigel holed a nine foot putt for a birdie on the National Golf Club of Kansas City’s par five 18th hole, to win by one stroke. He got down in two from a bunker that fronted the green for a 65 and an eleven under par 205 total. Sigel’s rounds were 72, 68 and 65. Mike McCullough finished second at 206 and Vicente Fernandez was next at 207. Hale Irwin and Pat McDonald tied for fourth with 210 totals. First prize was $240,000. The course measured 6, 875 yards.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Northeast Pennsylvania was held at the Country Club of Scranton on the third Wednesday of May. There were 42 players at Scranton competing for three spots. New York professionals Wade Montgomery and Jim Woods along with Pittsburgh professional Andy Latowski all finished their rounds in 70 strokes to wrap up the open spots.

Lloyd Weston, who was moving to Chicago to accommodate his wife’s job change, won the Rittenhouse Trust Golf Classic on the fourth Tuesday of May. Once again the Sunnybrook Golf Club hosted the event. When all the scores were posted Weston, John Appleget and Mike Moses were at the top of the summary sheet with two under par 70s. The three pros returned to the par four 18th hole for a sudden death playoff and they all made pars. Then they played the 18th hole again and Weston, who was now the teaching pro at the Flourtown Golf Club, stopped his second shot within inches of the cup. Appleget and Moses missed the green with their second shots and when they failed to hole out their third shots Weston was the winner of the tournament and the $25,000 first prize. Rich Steinmetz, Jonathon Doctor, David Quinn and Valley Forge Golf Club professional Hugo Mazzalupi tied for fourth with 71s.

The PGA Senior Championship was being played at the Aronimink Golf Club in the first week of June so the Philadelphia Section was very involved in the event. Harry Hammond chaired a committee for a junior clinic and Dick Smith, Jr., was the chairman of the event support committee. Harry Barbin and Michael Mack assisted Hammond and Smith. The Section helped recruit more than 100 volunteers. On Sunday before the tournament 270 boys and girls from 21 junior golf programs in the Delaware Valley attended the junior clinic. There was a 45 minute instruction session on the short and long game. After that the juniors were entertained by Ben Witter who showed off his repertoire of trick shots and his prodigious drives. Witter was now operating Ben’s Power Golf Driving Range. Through the effort of the Section staff numerous local companies donated food and drink for the Section’s hospitality center.

In the first week of June the PGA Senior Championship was played at the Aronimink Golf Club. After being held in Florida for more than sixty years the tournament was now in its third year of being moved around the country. Jim Masserio was in a dual role as the host professional and a contestant. John Jacobs (276), who had been full of potential for many years but had little to show for it, came through with a two-stroke victory. The tournament was plagued by rain as Jacobs had to play the last thirteen holes of his third round on Sunday morning. The most important people that week were the tow truck operators who kept rescuing cars that were stuck in the parking area on the DuPont property across from Aronimink. Jacobs put together rounds of 68, 69, 71 and 68 on the 6,928 yard par 70 course. First prize was $360,000. Bobby Watkins finished second at 278. Bruce Lietzke and Fuzzy Zoeller also finished under par for the tournament as they tied for third with 279s. Jay Sigel, who was an Aronimink member, tied for 17th at 284 and won $24,000. Ed Dougherty tied for 40th at 290 and won $7,350. Pete Oakley and Masserio missed the cut and each received $1,000 checks. Sigel and Dougherty were in the field off having been in the top 30 on the 2002 PGA Senior Tour money list. Oakley and Masserio had qualified at the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship in October 2002.    

Sectional qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at various locations around the United States. No one from the Philadelphia Section made it through that second level of qualifying. Jim Furyk was exempt from local and sectional qualifying.  

John Spina won the Variety Club Tournament of Champions in the first week of June at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club. The first day the pros played a pro-am event with amateurs to raise money for the Variety Club charities. Spina shot a 68 the first day and came back with a 69 the second day when the course was set up much more difficult. His seven under par 137 nipped Bill Sautter (138), who was now the teaching professional at Talamore @ Oak Terrace, and Jim Masserio (138) by one stroke. Terry Hatch, who was now on the PGA Nationwide Tour, finished fourth at 139. First place paid $6,500.

Qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open was held on the second Monday of June at The Springhaven Club. There were 112 pros and amateurs over the age of 50 competing for six places. A PGA Senior Tour event in New Jersey had ended on Sunday so there were quite a few very qualified players among the 102 entries at Springhaven. Due to that were three or four more spots than usual. Mark Hayes led with a three-under-par 67. Buddy Harston and Doug Lacrosse were next with 68s. Jay Overton won the fourth spot with a 69. Gary Koch and Mike Sanfilippo took the last two places with 70s. No one from the Philadelphia area made it there. Ed Dougherty and Jay Sigel were exempt off being in the top 30 money winners on the 2002 PGA Senior Tour.

Pete Oakley also made it through qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open. He qualified at the Country Club at Woodmore in Mitchellville, Maryland. Oakley was the medalist by four strokes with a four under par 68. There 70 players playing for two spots there. Amateur Marty West took the second spot with a 72.

Jason Bohn and future Section apprentice Steve Scott qualified for the PGA Nationwide Tour Northeast Pennsylvania Classic in the open qualifying on the second Monday of June.

The Glenmaura National Golf Club hosted the PGA Nationwide Tour Northeast Pennsylvania Classic in the middle of June. Forty-four-year-old Blain McCallister, who had previously won five times on the PGA Tour, made it into the winner’s circle again by shooting a 19 under par (68-64-64-69) 265. Bill Glasson finished second at 268. Ryuji Imada, Zack Johnson and Omar Uresti tied for third with 269 totals. First prize from the $450,000 purse was $81,000. Jason Bohn, who now had partial access to the Nationwide Tour got in through Monday qualifying and proceeded to put together a score of 275. Bohn won $4,875 for a 20th place tie. Dave Roberts and Emlyn Aubrey missed the cut by one stroke with three under par 141s. John Pillar, Terry Hatch, Chris Bartolacci, Tom Carter, host professional Cleve Coldwater and Steve Scott missed the cut. Aubrey and Carter were regular members of the Nationwide Tour. Roberts, Hatch and Bartolacci had qualified at the event for Philadelphia PGA. Pillar and Coldwater were there on sponsor’s exemptions. Scott had qualified on Monday also.   

Furyk, Jim
Jim Furyk

Jim Furyk experienced the best Father’s Day possible by winning the U.S. Open on the third Sunday of June. His father, Mike, who had been a professional and a pro golf salesman in the Philadelphia Section, and his mother were with him as usual. Jim was now 33 and his father was the only golf instructor he had ever had. Jim was also a father that year for the first time. The tournament was played at the Olympia Fields Country Club’s North Course near Chicago, Illinois. Furyk won his first major and in winning he tied the U.S. Open scoring record. Even though he made a bogey on each of the last two holes he finished with an eight under par 272. Furyk won by three strokes with rounds of 67, 66, 67 and 72. Furyk set a new low for the first two rounds (133) and for three rounds also (200). First prize was $1,080,000. Australia’s Stephen Leaney finished second at 275. Kenny Perry and Mike Weir tied for third at 279.

The PGA Professional National Championship, formerly called the Club Professional Championship, was played at the Twin Warriors Golf Club in Santa Anna Pueblo, New Mexico in the third week of June. The course was located 5,400 feet above sea level so the 7,624 yard set up was not that imposing. Tim Thelen (282) won the tournament for a second time with rounds of 74, 70, 69 and 69. Steve Schneiter finished one stroke back in second place at 283. Bob Sowards, Ron Philo, Dino Lucchesi and Kevin Burton also finished under the par of 288 as they tied for third with 287 totals. Terry Hatch tied for seventh at 288 and won $13,750. By finishing in the top 20 Hatch qualified for the PGA Championship. John DiMarco, Rob Shuey, John Pillar, David Quinn and John Appleget missed the cut. They had all qualified for the CPC at the Eastern CPC in September. First prize was $53,000 from a purse of $400,000.   

Chris Bartolacci, David Quinn and Rick Gibney qualified for the PGA Nationwide Tour’s Reeses Cup Classic in the Section qualifying on the fourth Tuesday of June. Qualifying was held on the Hershey Country Club’s East Course. The entry fee was $175.

The Burlington Classic was held at the Burlington Country Club on the last two days of June. On Sunday two pros were paired with three amateurs in a pro-am and the round counted as the first round for the individual professional purse. Greg Farrow, who had worked at Burlington as an assistant, shot a 66 and the next day he came back with a 65. His nine under par 131 total gave him a four shot victory over Mark Sheftic (135). Paul Oglesby and Ken Peyre-Ferry tied for third at 138.  

The U.S. Senior Open was played in late June at the Inverness Club in Toledo, Ohio. Bruce Lietzke (69-71-64-73) won the tournament by two strokes even though he made bogies on the last two holes. His seven under par 277 score brought him in two strokes in front of Tom Watson (279). First prize was $470,000. Vicente Fernandez finished third at 280. Allen Doyle and Fuzzy Zoeller tied for fourth with 285s. Ed Dougherty tied for 17th at 291, winning $39,831. Jay Sigel tied for 30th at 295 and won $17,371. Pete Oakley tied for 35th at 296 and won $14,801. Dougherty and Sigel were exempt off being in the top 30 money winners on the 2002 PGA Senior Tour. Oakley was there off having been successful at one of the USGA’s qualifying sites.

On July 3rd the USGA announced new testing procedures for the golf ball. A titanium head would now be used on the Iron Byron driving machine which was used for testing golf balls. The club’s swing speed had been increased from 109 mph to 120. The driver face was set at a COR of .820, the launch angle at 10 degrees, ball spin of 42 revolutions per second and a steel shaft would continue to be used in the testing driver. Under the new testing the allowable distance was increased from 296.8 yards to 320 yards.   

Jason Bohn and Tom Carter, two golf professionals who had grown up in the Philadelphia Section, tied for first in the Canadian PGA Championship. The tournament was a PGA Nationwide Tour event. Carter (70-69-66-70) made a fifteen foot putt for a birdie on the last hole to catch Bohn (70-65-68-72) who played the last seven holes in four over par. They finished the 72-holes tied at nine under par 275 on the 7,067 yard course. Carter then proceeded to win the tournament on the first hole of a sudden death with a par five on the 18th hole. Carter’s victory came in the first week of July at the Diamondback Golf Club in Richmond Hill, Ontario. It was his first win on the PGA Nationwide Tour. Carter won $81,000 and Bohn won $48,600. Blain McCallister finished third at 276 and five players tied for fourth with 277s.

The PGA Nationwide Tour’s Reeses Cup Classic was played on the Hershey Country Club’s East Course in the second week of July. Joe Ogilvie put together rounds of 71, 67, 66 and 70 for a ten-under-par 274. First prize was $81,000 from the $450,000 purse. Paul Claxton, Zack Johnson, David McKenzie and Wes Short, Jr. tied for second with 277 totals. Jason Bohn tied for 10th at 280 and won $11,250. Tom Carter finished at 282 and tied for 17th, winning $6,090. Rick Price posted a 285 and won $2,250 as he tied for 37th. Rob Shuey, Emlyn Aubrey, Terry Hatch, Chris Bartolacci, David Quinn and Rick Gibney missed the cut. The host professional was Mike Battistelli. Bohn, Carter, Price and Aubrey were on the Nationwide Tour. Shuey had a sponsor’s exemption. Hatch had limited status on the Nationwide Tour. Bartolacci, Quinn and Gibney qualified at the Section’s qualifying event.

On the second Monday of July the Philadelphia PGA Assistant Championship was played at the Seaview Country Club. Both the par 71 Pines and par 71 Bay courses were used. Barry Dear put together a 67 on the Bay Course in the morning round and a 74 on the Pines Course in the afternoon. His one under par 141 nipped Dave Roberts (142) by one stroke. Rich Steinmetz and Vince Ramagli tied for third at 142.

Farrow, Greg (TGH) (2)
Greg Farrow

At age 52, Greg Farrow became the oldest player to win the New Jersey Open when he holed a fifteen foot putt for a par on the last green at the Ridgewood Country Club. Farrow was just the fourth person from southern New Jersey to win the tournament. The tournament was played in the third week of July. All three nine-hole courses at Ridgewood were used during the tournament. After starting with rounds of 68 and 73 Farrow (211) began the last round two strokes back in a five-way tie for second. In the final round Farrow holed a fifteen-foot putt on the last green for a 70 to win by one stroke. Brent Studer finished second at 212. David Quinn, Bill Britton and Mark Schaare tied for third with 213 totals. Farrow took home a check for $15,000 from the $75,000 purse.

Brian Kelly won the Philadelphia Open for the second time in four years. The tournament was played at the Huntingdon Valley Country Club on the third Wednesday of July. Huntingdon Valley’s par 70 course was as difficult as usual so Kelly’s (143) steady rounds of 71 and 72 won by two strokes. The greens were quite firm and the wind picked up in the afternoon. Stu Ingraham and Mark Sheftic tied for second with 145s. Pete Oakley and Rich Steinmetz tied for fourth at 146. First prize was $3,500. Through prequalifying rounds and exemptions there were 45 professionals and 15 amateurs in the starting field. As usual in the tournament all the players were required to walk with caddies.

The Philadelphia Section Senior Championship and qualifying for the Senior PGA Professional National Championship, formerly called the Senior Club Professional Championship, was at the Brandywine Country Club in the third week of July. The Section had been allotted eight qualifying spots. Pete Oakley (134) ran away from the field of 32 senior professionals as he shot a 65 on Thursday and a 69 on Friday. His eight under par total was eight shots better than anyone else. Oakley earned $1,200 from the $5,672 purse for his two days work. Oakley was exempt from having to qualify for the national championship as a former winner of the tournament. Ken Peyre-Ferry and Jimmy Booros, who was now the teaching pro at the Southmoore Golf Club, tied for second at 142. Roger Stern finished fourth at 143. Don DeAngelis, who was now the teaching pro at the Woods Golf Center, Jim Masserio and Jay Friedman, who was now the professional at the Island Green Country Club, tied for fifth. Masserio was also exempt off his third place finish in the national tournament the year before. Rick Osberg (146), Frank Palumbo (146) and J.R. Delish (146), who was now retired, got past Dan Haskell (146) in a sudden death playoff for the last three spots.

The British Open was played in the third week of July at the Royal St. George’s Golf Club in Kent, England. Unheralded Ben Curtis (283) won with rounds of 72, 72, 70 and 69 even though he made three bogies on the last five holes.  With three holes to go Thomas Bjorn led by two strokes but when he took three strokes to exit a greenside bunker Curtis took the lead. Bjorn tied for second with Vijay Singe at 284. Tiger Woods and Davis Love tied for fourth at 285. First prize was $1,112,720. Jim Furyk, who was exempt as the U.S. Open champion, missed the cut.

On the first Sunday of August Jim Furyk won on the PGA Tour for the second time in 2003 as he captured the Buick Open. Furyk (68-66-65-68) managed to hold off Tiger Woods who closed fast with a 66. His 21 under par 267 was two better than Woods who ended up tied for second with Chris DiMarco, Geoff Ogilvy and Briny Baird at 269. Furyk’s first prize check was for $720,000 and the total purse was $4,000,000.   

Jason Bohn won the PGA Nationwide Tour Chattanooga Classic on first Sunday of August. Bohn (65-67-69-64) shot an eight under par 64 in the last round to come from behind and win the $81,000 first prize. Bohn played the last nine in five under par and he birdied the par five finishing hole to win. He finished with a 23 under par 265 that was one shot better than Kyle Thompson’s 266. It was Bohn’s first win on the Nationwide Tour. Ryan Palmer finished third at 267. Tom Carter and Jimmy Walker tied for fourth at 268. Carter won $19,800. The total purse was $450,000.

The Shawnee Open was played at the Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort on the fourth Monday of July. It had been a two round tournament since 1990 but in 2003 the tournament had to be reduced to one round due to rain. Mark Parisi and Bob Hibschman tied for first with five under par 67s. Parisi made a double-eagle two on the par five 15th hole to tie Hibschman. On Tuesday there was so much rain the round was canceled. A sudden death playoff was held, which Parisi won with a par four on the first hole against a bogey for Hibschman. George Frake finished third with a 68.

Stonewall hosted the Pennsylvania Open in the second week of August. Steven Wheatcroft, a mini-tour pro from Western Pennsylvania, and Kevin Sheilds, an assistant pro from Western Pennsylvania, finished the three rounds tied for the title at even par 210. The two players were paired together in the final round. Wheatcroft (71-67-72), who trailed by one stroke playing the last hole, struck a 7-iron from 174 yards to within four feet of the hole. Shields (68-71-71) then pulled his second shot over a stone wall onto the practice putting green. After taking a drop from the practice green he pitched back over the wall to three feet of the hole. Both players holed their putts. The two players returned to the 18th tee for a sudden death playoff. Shields drove into the deep fescue rough and made a bogey while Wheatcroft was on the green in two and two putted for a par and the win. The purse was $50,000 and first prize was $10,000 as it had been for several years. Brian Kelly (211) shot a last round 68 and missed the playoff by one stroke. Travis Deibert, Mark Sheftic and amateur Chris Lange tied for fourth at 213.

On the third Sunday of August Tom Carter won the PGA Nationwide Tour Price Cutter Classic. The tournament was played at the Highland Springs Country Club in Springfield, Missouri. It was his second win on the Nationwide Tour that year. Carter put together rounds of 66, 68, 68 and 65 for a twenty-one under par 267. As low as that score was he only won by one stroke. He won $94,500 from the $525,000 purse. After several weeks of missing cuts Carter was now almost assured of advancing to the PGA Tour in 2004. Doug LaBelle II and Roland Thatcher tied for second at 268. Trevor Dodds, Keoke Cotner, Stephen Gangluff and Craig Bowden tied for fourth with 269 totals.

In mid August dark horse Sean Micheel won the 85th PGA Championship when his uphill seven-iron shot from 175 yards ended up two inches from the cup. Micheel’s (69-68-69-70) four under par 276 gave him his first win on the PGA Tour by two strokes. The tournament was played at the 7,134 yard Oak Hill Country Club in Rochester, New York. Chad Campbell (278), Tim Clark (279) and Alex Cejka (280) finished second, third and fourth. At $1,080,000 the first prize in the tournament was over $1 million for the first time. The total purse was $5,938,300, which was also a record. Jim Furyk finished tied for 18th at 287 and won $73,000. Terry Hatch missed the cut and received a check for $2,000. Furyk was in the field off his position on the 2002 money list along with other exemptions. Hatch had qualified in June at the PGA Club Professional Championship.   

Hatch, Terry (TGH)
Terry Hatch

Terry Hatch missed the cut at the PGA Championship but five days later he won the Philadelphia Section PGA Championship. The tournament was played at the Philadelphia Cricket Club’s new par 72 Militia Hill Course in the third week of August. The course measured 7,370 but all of the back tees were not used on any one day. Hatch (209) put together rounds of 73, 67 and 69 to come from two strokes behind after two rounds. On the fourteenth hole of the second round Hatch drove into the rough and noticed that a piece of gum was adhering to his golf ball. He played that ball with the gum attached and a second ball without the gum. He made an eagle with the second ball and after he completed the round he was told that his score with that ball would be the one that counted. George Frake finished second at 213. David Quinn, Vince Ramagli and Rick Osberg, who was now the teaching professional at the Hartefeld National Golf Club, tied for third with 214 totals. The purse was $66,000 and first prize was $7,500. The host professional was Terry McDowell. The Philadelphia PGA Championship was also the qualifying event for the Eastern Club Professional Championship. The Section had been allotted 19 places. Hatch was exempt off his finish in the National Club Professional Championship, so Frake won the first spot. The next three places went to Rick Osberg, David Quinn and Vince Ramagli. Dave McNabb (215) won the fifth spot and the sixth spot went to John Appleget (216). Rich Steinmetz (217) and Pete Oakley (217) won the seventh and eighth places. Mike Moses (218) won the ninth spot. The tenth and eleventh places were won by Brian Kelly (219) and Terry Hertzog (219). Stu Ingraham (220) and John DiMarco (220) took the twelfth and thirteenth places. Twining Valley Golf Club teaching professional Hugh P. Reilly (221), Dave Roberts (221), Rob Shuey (221), Jimmy Booros (221) Jonathan Doctor (221) and Berkshire Country Club assistant Mike Grabosky (221),  earned the last six spots.

The Whitford Classic was played at the Whitford Country Club in the fourth week of August. On Sunday each pairing had two pros paired with two amateurs in a pro-am event. The pros’ score also counted toward the two-day individual prize. At the end of play on Monday Rob Shuey (68-69) and Plymouth Country Club assistant Tom Ryan (64-73) were tied. Shuey won a sudden death playoff for the title with a birdie on the second extra hole. Rich Steinmetz and Terry Hatch tied for third with 139 totals. Ryan’s 64 was a course record.

Carter, Tom 5 (TGH)
Tom Carter

On the last day of August Tom Carter won for the third time in 2003 on the PGA Nationwide Tour. By winning three times in one year on the Nationwide Tour Carter earned an automatic promotion to the PGA Tour. Carter put together rounds of 68, 68, 62 and 65 for a seventeen under par 263 to win the Alberta Classic going away, by five strokes. The tournament was hosted by The Links at Glen Eagles in Cochrane, Alberta, Canada. His first place check from the $450,000 purse was for $81,000. Nick Cassini finished second at 268. Mike Standley and Mario Tiziana tied for third with 269s.  

In the second week of September the Philadelphia PGA Executive Director Jack Lutz resigned.

The Eastern PGA Professional National Championship was held at the Royce Brook Golf Club in Hillsborough, New Jersey during the fourth week of September. There was plenty of rain. The third round was eliminated due to rain and the players were allowed to lift, clean and place their golf balls on the fairways all three rounds. Par was 72 and the course measured 7,103 yards. Rick Hartmann (66-70-69) won for the second straight year and this time by a wide margin. His 205 total was six strokes better than Rick Schuller (211). Five players tied for third at 213. Stu Ingraham, John DiMarco and Pete Oakley tied for 13th at 216. They each won $2,086 Vince Ramagli and John Appleget tied for 20th with 217 totals, each winning $1,425. David Quinn 218 finished tied for 26th and won $1,103. By having finished in the top 32 they qualified for the 2004 PGA Club Professional Championship. Mike Moses (222) tied for 48th, winning $694. Rich Steinmetz (223) tied for 55th and won $625. Dave McNabb (225) tied for 65th and won $530.

The first Woodloch Springs Open was played on the last two days of September at the Country Club at Woodloch Springs. Dave Roberts (69-73) won with a two under par 142. Roberts defeated the host professional John Pillar (70-72), who had also posted a 142, in a sudden death playoff. Rich Steinmetz and Rob Shuey tied for third at 145. First prize was $2,000.

The Philadelphia PGA defeated the Golf Association of Philadelphia’s amateur team at the Tattersall Golf Club on the first Tuesday of October. There were twelve on each team and two had to be seniors. Play went off in fours with two pros and two amateurs in each group. In each pairing there were two singles matches and a better-ball match with one point for each match. The Pete Oakley-Rick Osberg team won 3 points. The teams of Mark Sheftic-Chris Bartolacci, Dave Roberts-Ken Peyre-Ferry, Dave Seeman-Mickey Sokalski and the senior team of Gary Hardin-Don DeAngelis each won 2 points. Tom Ryan-Vince Ramagli won 1-1/2 points. That made the final score 12-1/2 points for the PGA and 5-1/2 for the GAP. After thirteen years of matches the PGA led with eleven wins against one loss and one tie.  

Dave Roberts won the Philadelphia Section PGA Match Play Championship on the fourth Wednesday of October. The Concord Country Club hosted the three-day tournament. There were 53 entries so thirteen byes were given in the first round to create a match play ladder of 64. Two matches were played on Monday, two on Tuesday and two on Wednesday. Roberts met Rich Steinmetz in the finals where he eked out a one-up victory. To get to the finals Roberts had also gotten past Mark Sheftic in the semifinals by a one-up margin as well. In the other semifinal match Steinmetz had to go 19 holes to defeat Rob Shuey. First prize was $1,700 from a purse of $7,300.

The PGA Senior Professional National Championship was played on the PGA Golf Club’s South Course in the fourth week of October. Jeff Thomsen (69-70-73-70) and Jeff Fiedler (73-68-71-70) tied for first at six under par 282. Thomsen won a sudden death playoff with a par on the third extra hole. Lonnie Nielson finished third at 283. Roger Kennedy, Darrell Kestner and Mike San Filippo tied for fourth at 284. Thomsen took home a check for $18,000 and the Leo F. Fraser trophy. Jim Masserio tied for 21st at 290 and won $2,458.34. Pete Oakley tied for 31st at 292, winning $1,950. By finishing in the top 35 Masserio and Oakley qualified for the 2004 PGA Senior Championship. Rick Osberg tied for 59th at 298 and won $1,000. Jimmy Booros, Jay Friedman, Roger Stern, Don DeAngelis, Frank Palumbo and Ken Peyre-Ferry missed the cut. J.R. Delish had qualified but to a scheduling conflict he didn’t play in the tournament. The course measured 6,690 yards.

The PGA Assistant Championship was held in Florida on the PGA Golf Club’s Dye Course. The tournament concluded on the second Sunday of November. Kyle Flinton (66-68-68-68) won the tournament for a second straight year. His 18 under par 270 was a record score for the tournament. Loren Personette finished second at 274. Bob Blean (280) finished third and Robert Gaus (281) was fourth. Barry Dear finished fifth at 282, winning $2,140. First prize from the $65,000 purse was $5,000.

Carpus, Tom 3 (TGH)
Tom Carpus

The Section’s fall meeting was hosted by the Philadelphia Country Club on the first Monday of November. Geoffrey Surrette was introduced as the new Executive Director of the Philadelphia Section PGA. Surrette, a PGA member and formerly a head professional, had been the Section’s Tournament Director since October of 2002. It was an election year. Tom Carpus, who had been the vice president for two years, was elected president. Dick Smith, Jr. moved up from secretary to vice president. Jay Gallo was elected secretary. Rob Shuey became the Director of Tournaments. There was a competitive race for the Director of Section Affairs position between Jim Smith, Jr. and Lori Van Sickle, which Smith won. The seven District Directors were also elected. David Quinn was the “Player of the Year” and Greg Farrow won the DeBaufre Trophy with a 70.86 average per round in the designated tournaments. Pete Oakley was the Robert ‘Skee’ Riegel Senior Player of the Year”.

Hogan, Ben 11 (TGH)
Ben Hogan

Ben Hogan was inducted into the Philadelphia PGA Hall of Fame at the Section’s fall meeting. Hogan was born in Dublin, Texas in 1912 and grew up caddying with Byron Nelson at the Glen Garden Country Club in Ft. Worth. He turned pro in 1931 and tried the PGA Tour without success. In 1938 he finally began to win enough money to stay on the tour. That year Henry Picard invited Hogan to play in the Hershey Four-Ball. He was the only entrant without a tournament win. Most of the field had won majors but Hogan and his partner Vic Ghezzi won the event by a large margin. Hogan now had his first win but it took until 1940 for him to gain his first individual win, when he won the North and South Open. The next year he signed on with the Hershey Country Club as their golf professional. From 1941 through 1942 he won a total of eleven times and led in money won each year. In late 1942 Hogan quit the PGA Tour to enroll in a private flight school and then he enlisted in the Army Air Corps. In the late summer of 1945 Hogan was discharged from the army in time to win five tournaments and the next year he won thirteen times and topped the money list again. After that he cut his schedule some but he still won 18 tournaments in the next two years. In early February of 1949 Hogan and his wife Valerie were involved in an accident with a bus and the doctors didn’t expect him to ever play golf again much less win tournaments. One year later Hogan entered the Los Angeles Open and finished in a tie for first with Sam Snead, only to lose an 18-hole playoff. Later that year in June he won the U.S. Open at Merion Golf Club and showed the golf world that he was back. The next year he won the Masters and the U.S. Open. The day after winning the 1951 U.S. Open his contract with the Hershey C.C. ran out. If Milton Hershey had still been alive Hogan would have probably been with Hershey for a few more years. He went on to win the Masters, U.S. Open and the British Open in 1953. Soon after that he started the Ben Hogan Golf Equipment Company, which was a big success. Hogan won 63 times on the PGA Tour with 53 of those coming while he was Hershey’s professional. Nine of his wins came in the majors. He won four U.S. Opens, two PGA Championships, two Masters Tournaments and the British Open. He was a member of four Ryder Cup teams and the captain of two of them. Hogan won the Vardon Trophy five times, topped the money list five times and he was the “PGA Player-of-the-Year” four times. In 1953 Hogan was elected to the PGA Hall of Fame.

The PGA of America’s annual meeting was held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in San Antonio, Texas during the second week of November. Six members announced their intent to run for the office of secretary, which was up for election in 2004. The delegates were informed that the PGA had signed a letter of intent to partner with a Texas based company on a proposed golf resort that would be named PGA Village San Antonio. The delegates were told that there were now fourteen colleges and universities participating in the PGA Professional Golf Management Program. Former president George Herbert Walker Bush was made an honorary PGA member. The Philadelphia Section was represented by delegates Tom Carpus and Dick Smith, Jr. Past national presidents Dick Smith, Sr. and Jack Connelly were also in attendance along with national director Leo DeGisi.

Jim Furyk won the PGA Grand Slam of Golf at the Poipu Bay Golf Course in Kauai, Hawaii during the first week of December. It was his fourth career win in Hawaii. The event featured the winners of the four major golf tournaments that year. Furyk (U.S. Open) put together a 67 and a 68 for a nine under par 135 to win the $400,000 first place check. Mike Weir (Masters) finished eight shots back in second place at 143. Shaun Micheel (PGA) shot 145 and Ben Curtis (British Open) was fourth at 146. The total prize money was $1,000,000. The course measured 7,081 yards.

Pete Oakley qualified for the European Senior PGA Tour in late November. Oakley survived two stages of qualifying in Portugal. The first stage was 36-holes. At the 72-hole final stage there were eight spots to qualify for.  Oakley holed a short par putt on the last green to end up at three under par for the 72 holes. A bit of luck helped get him through as he holed out an eight-iron that hit the pin and fell into the hole, on the ninth hole of the final round. He finished in a five-way tie for fourth place, which meant that his score was right on the number. Even though those five had qualified playoffs were needed to sort out an official order to determine eligibility for some of the future tournaments. Oakley made a birdie on the first hole of the sudden death playoff to lock up the fourth spot.

Tiger Woods was the “PGA Player of the Year” for the fifth straight year and he won the Vardon Trophy for a fifth straight year with a scoring average of 68.41 strokes per round. Jim Furyk had an outstanding year as he won the U.S. Open and the Memorial along with winning $5,182,865 in the 27 tournaments that he entered on the PGA Tour. That put him in fourth place on the money list. Tom Carter earned a “battlefield promotion’ on the Nationwide Tour and was able to play in eight tournaments on the PGA Tour late in the year where he won $105,143. Vijay Singe was the leading money winner on the PGA Tour as he won $7,573,907 in 27 tournaments.

Tom Watson led the PGA Senior Tour money list with $1,853,108. Jay Sigel won $721,989 in 30 tournaments and finished 29th on the money list. Ed Dougherty played in 29 events and finished 33rd on the money list with earnings of $565,146. Pete Oakley won $14,801 in two tournaments.

Tom Carter had a big year on the PGA Nationwide Tour as he won three tournaments, which earned him an automatic promotion to the PGA Tour. Carter earned $360,990 in 22 tournaments and finished third on the money list. Jason Bohn won a tournament and $255,191 in 18 starts and earned a yearend promotion to the PGA Tour for his ninth place finish on the money list. Rick Price played in 23 tournaments and finished 71st on the money list with earnings of $70,307. Emlyn Aubrey won $58,367 in 24 tournaments and was 80th on the money list. Terry Hatch played in 18 events and won $13,708.

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2004

Smith, Dick Jr 2 (TGH)
Dick Smith, Jr.
The Section’s spring meeting was held on the first Monday of April at the Atlantic City Convention Center. After the meeting there was a pro-pro event at the Blue Heron Pines Golf Club and the East and West Courses were used. There were 225 Section members and apprentices in attendance. National director for District II, Leo DeGisi, reported on the affairs of the PGA of America. The Section’s financial report showed a total of $433,474 in net assets at the end of 2003. The service awards were presented. Dick Smith, Jr. had received the “PGA Golf Professional of the Year” at the fall meeting. He had been the head professional at the Woodcrest Country Club for eleven years and he was the assistant to his father Dick, for four years before that. Smith was the vice president of the Section and for nine years he had been either an officer or a district director. Before that he had volunteered his services many times for any request. Smith had served on several Section committees and he had always been ready to offer his golf course for Section events. Most years he hosted at least two tournaments. He was the third one in his family to receive the award. His father Dick Smith, Sr. won the award in 1980 and his uncle, Tom Smith, won it in 1986.

The PGA of America had requested that the various PGA Sections give out the annual awards in the spring instead of the fall in order to give the national committees more time to judge the candidates before giving out the national awards. Another change was that a PGA Section could nominate a member for the national award that had not won that award at the local level that year. In order to make this change the Section gave out two “Golf Professional of the Year” awards in 2003.

The Masters Tournament was held at the Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia in the second week of April. After several missed opportunities Phil Mickelson captured his first major title by holing an 18-foot downhill birdie putt on the 72nd green to win the tournament. He put together rounds of 72, 69, 69 and 69 for a nine under par 279. On Thursday play was suspended for two hours due to weather problems and 18 players had to finish their rounds early Friday morning. Mickelson was one of the 18. Ernie Els finished second at 280 and K.J. Choi was next at 282. Sergio Garcia and Bernhard Langer tied for fourth with 285s. First prize was $1,170,000 and the purse was $5,600,000. Jim Furyk was invited as a winner of the U.S. Open in the past five years, but didn’t play due to an ailing wrist, which he had had surgically repaired in late 2003. On one from the Philadelphia Section was in the field.   

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Northern Pennsylvania was at the Bucknell Country Club on the second Thursday of May. The host professional Brian Kelly (70) and amateur James Bohn III (70) won the two spots that had been allotted to that site in a three-man sudden death playoff. Par was 70.       

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Philadelphia was held on the second Friday of May at Talamore @ Oak Terrace. With the help of a front nine 31 Sean O’Hair, who was now living in Southeastern Pennsylvania and playing the professional golf mini-tours out of the Concord Country Club, led the field with a four under par 67. Dave McNabb finished second with a 69. Amateur Tyler Randol was third at 70. Joe Daley (71), who was playing the Nationwide Tour, won the fourth and last place as he outlasted two others in a sudden death playoff that went five holes. Jim Furyk was exempt from both local and sectional qualifying. Tom Carter was exempt from local qualifying for having won at least one tournament on the 2003 PGA Nationwide Tour.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Southern New Jersey was on the third Monday of May at the Pine Hill Golf Club. There was a large entry at Pine Hill and seven spots were allotted to the site. Reinstated amateur Bill Jeremiah won the medal with a two under par 68. Joey Bonargo, who was playing the professional mini-tours out of Doylestown, took the next place with a 69 and John DiMarco was third at 70. Amateur Russ Cox won the fourth place with a 71. Four players tied for the last three places with 72s and due to a rain delay the playoff had to be held the next morning. Dave Roberts, John Appleget and amateur Brian Rothaus prevailed in the playoff.  

U.S. Open local qualifying in Central Pennsylvania was at the Colonial Country Club on the third Monday of May. Arizona professional Miguel Rivera led the field with a five under par 66. Mark Sheftic along with amateurs Brandon Knaub and Jarred Texter posted 69s to take the next three of the four spots.

Qualifying for Section members who desired to play in the PGA Nationwide Tour’s Northeast Pennsylvania Classic was at the Glenmaura Golf Club on the fourth Tuesday of May. There were three places in the starting field up for grabs. John Pillar led with a three under par 69 and the host professional Cleve Coldwater was next with a 71. Dave Roberts and David Quinn, who was now the professional and manager of the Links Golf Club, tied for the last spot with 72s. Roberts won that last place in a sudden death playoff.

On the fourth Thursday of May the PGA Nationwide Tour’s Reese’s Cup Classic qualifying for Section members was held at the Hershey Country Club’s East Course. There were three spots. David Quinn led with a one-under-par 70. The other two spots were won by Terry Hertzog (71) and Vince Ramagli (72). Hertzog was now the professional at the Bent Creek Country Club.

The PGA Senior Championship was played at the Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville, Kentucky at the end of May. There were five weather delays which totaled seven inches of rain and it took a fifth day to complete the tournament. Hale Irwin won the tournament for a fourth time with rounds of 67, 69, 69 and 71. His eight under par 276 nipped Jay Haas (277) for the $360,000 first prize by one stroke. Craig Stadler finished third at 279. Tom Watson, Dave Barr and Mark James tied for fourth with 282s. Jay Sigel tied for 27th at 291 and won $13,250. Pete Oakley missed the cut. Sigel was exempt as a fully exempt player on the PGA Senior Tour. Oakley and Jim Masserio had qualified for the tournament at the 2003 PGA Senior Professional National Championship but Masserio didn’t enter the tournament. The purse was $2,000,000.

The Rittenhouse Trust Classic was now the Haverford Trust Classic. The tournament was played on the first Tuesday of June at the Sunnybrook Golf Club. The sponsor was adding $2,500 to the first prize each year and it was now $27,500 out of a total purse of $58,300. Bob Hibschman teed off at 7:21 am and proceeded to make a double-bogey on the first hole. He went on to birdie three of the last five holes, which was topped off with a 20-foot birdie putt on the last hole. That put him in the clubhouse with a one under par 71 and no one was able to match it. John Pillar, Stu Ingraham, David Quinn, Rob Shuey and Bellewood Golf Club professional Pete Carmain, all finished with 72s and they each won $2,370.

Rich Steinmetz won the Burlington Classic in the first week of June in a sudden death playoff with Stu Ingraham. They had finished tied with identical rounds of 64 on Sunday and 71 on Monday at the Burlington Country Club. On Sunday two pros were paired with three amateurs for a pro-am and their individual scores counted for the professional event. The course was set up shorter for the Sunday pro-am. Steinmetz and Ingraham’s six under par 134 totals were four strokes ahead of the field. Greg Farrow finished third at 139. Bill Sautter, Dick Smith, Jr. and Dave Fields, who was an assistant at Allentown’s Brookside Country Club, tied for fourth with 140s.

Tom Carter made it through the sectional qualifying for the U.S. Open at the Canoe Brook Country Club in Summit, New Jersey on the first Monday of June. There were 138 players competing for 22 spots at Canoe Brook. The large number was because the PGA Tour was in the area. There were two courses at Canoe Brook and both were used. The North Course and the South Course both played to a par of 72. David Moreland IV (67-67) and J.P. Hayes (65-69) tied for the medal with ten under par 134s. Carter finished third at (66-69) 135. Five players with 140 totals played off for the last spot. No one else from the Philadelphia Section qualified. Jim Furyk was exempt from local and sectional qualifying. Carter had been exempt from local qualifying for having won at least one tournament on the PGA Nationwide Tour in the past year.  

Stu Ingraham won the Variety Club Tournament of Champions in the middle of June with two fantastic rounds of golf. The scores were all low and his was lower. Ingraham shot a 66 on Tuesday during the pro-am portion of the tournament and then he bettered that with a 65 on Wednesday. His thirteen under par 131 was five strokes lower than anyone else in the field. Usually the scores were low the first day as the golf course was set up easy for the pro-am, but this year the scores were low both days. Mark Sheftic and Rich Steinmetz tied for second with 136 totals. Rob Shuey finished fourth at 137.

The U.S. Open was played at the Shinnecock Hills Golf Club in the third week of June. The course measured 7,150 yards and played to a par 70. Retief Goosen won the tournament for the second time in four years. The course played relatively easy the first two days but then it dried out and conditions became very difficult. Goosen turned in scores of 70, 66 and 69 over the first three rounds to take a two stroke lead into the last round. By Sunday a few greens were so dried out that the grass was all but dead. In the last round no one broke par and only one player equaled par. Goosen one putted 11 greens on Sunday and several were for bogies. He finished with a 71 and his 276 total was two strokes better than Phil Mickelson (276). Jeff Maggert finished third at 281. Mike Weir and Shigeki Maruyma tied for fourth at 284. The defending champion Jim Furyk, who was just coming back from wrist surgery, tied for 48th at 298 and won $23,325. Tom Carter tied for 55th at 300 and won $18,405. Furyk was exempt as a winner of the tournament in the past five years and in several other categories. Carter had qualified in Summit, New Jersey. First prize was $1,125,000.

The PGA Nationwide Tour Northeast Pennsylvania Classic was played in the third week of June at the Glenmaura National Golf Club. The tournament came down to a battle between D.A. Points (67-66-71-66—270) and James Driscoll (67-69-67-67—270). Driscoll holed a 25-foot putt for a birdie on the last hole to tie Points but then he made a double bogey on the same hole in a sudden-death playoff. Points made a par to win the $81,000 first place check. Ryuji Imada finished third with a twelve-under-par 272 and Darron Stiles was fourth at 273. Rick Price (281) tied for 27th and won $3,195. John Pillar, Dave Roberts, Cleve Coldwater and Ted Tryba missed the cut. Price was a regular on the Nationwide Tour. Pillar, Roberts and Coldwater had qualified at the Section’s qualifier. Tryba had status on the Nationwide Tour as a former winner on the PGA Tour.

The PGA Professional National Championship was held at the Longaberger Golf Club in Nashport, Ohio during the fourth week of June. The winner was Bob Sowards (69-68-69-70) who finished with a twelve under par 276. Mike Small was a close second at 277. Chip Sullivan finished third at 280. Ron Philo, Jeff Coston and Tim Fleming tied for fourth with 281s. David Quinn tied for 27th at 290 and won $3,161.54. Stu Ingraham tied for 43rd at 292, winning $2,310. John Appleget tied for 74th with a 300 total and won $1,365. Vince Ramagli and John DiMarco missed the cut. The top 25 qualified for the PGA Championship. All of the players in the field were either exempt or had qualified at regional tournaments in the fall of 2003. First prize was $60,000 from a purse of 450,000. The course measured 7,225 yards.

Open qualifying for the PGA Nationwide Tour Reese’s Cup Classic was held on the last Monday of June. The field was so large that two courses were needed. Half of the field qualified at Dauphin Highlands Golf Club and the Blue Ridge Country Club. There were seven spots at each course. Charley Hoffman was low at Dauphin Highlands with a nine-under-par 63. Chris Wisler, who was playing the mini-tours out of Dover, Delaware, finished second with a 64 and it took a 67 to qualify. Kevin Durkin was low at Blue Ridge with a seven-under-par 65 and it took 69 or better to qualify there.

The PGA Nationwide Tour Reese’s Cup Classic was played on the Hershey Country Club’s East Course in the first week of July. Ben Bates (70-69-66-73—278) and Paul Gow (68-68-70-72—278) tied at six under par and then played a sudden-death playoff that lasted eight holes. Bates, who had to make a 22-foot putt on the last hole to tie, made a par on the par-three 16th hole to win the marathon playoff. Jason Caron and Doug Barron tied for third with 280 totals. First prize was $81,000. Chris Wisler, Terry Hertzog, Rick Price, Vince Ramagli, David Quinn, Brandon Knaub and Rick Gibney missed the cut. Price was on the Nationwide Tour. Gibney and Knaub, who was playing various golf tours, had exemptions from the sponsor. Wisler had qualified at the Monday open qualifier. Hertzog, Ramagli and Quinn had qualified at the Section’s qualifying event. The course measured 7,154 yards.

Ken Peyre-Ferry qualified for the U.S. Senior Open at the Hidden Creek Golf Club on the first Wednesday of July. Peyre-Ferry and amateur Vincent Yost tied for the only two spots that were up for grabs with two under par 69s.

The New Jersey Open was played at the Crestmont Country Club, West Orange, New Jersey in the middle of July. Ed Whitman (209) won with rounds of 67, 67 and 75. Vince Ramagli tied for second with Chris Nallen with four under par 212s. Tyler Hall (215) and Brett Jones (215) tied for fourth.

The Philadelphia PGA Assistant Championship was held at the Jericho National Golf Club on the third Monday of July. Bill Sautter took the title with a morning 74 and an afternoon 67. His three under par 141 edged out Rich Steinmetz (142) by one stroke. Bill Walker, who was now a teaching pro at Talamore @ Oak Terrace, and Tom Ryan, who was now the teaching pro at the Phoenixville Country Club, tied for third with 143s. Four players qualified for the national championship. Sautter, Steinmetz, Walker and Ryan qualified. Vince Ramagli, who tied for fifth at 144, wound up going to the tournament in place of Walker.   

The 100th Philadelphia Open was played on the third Wednesday of July. The first Philadelphia Open was held in 1903 and due to the cancellation of two Opens for World War II the 100th was now being held in 2004. The tournament was hosted by one of the Golf Association of Philadelphia’s founding clubs, the Philadelphia Country Club. Since the tournament was the open event of the ruling amateur golf body in the Philadelphia area it was fitting when one of their own, amateur Chris Lange, won the tournament. Par was reduced from 71 to 70 for the tournament. There were 45 professionals and 15 amateurs in the field. Play was started from #1 and #10 tees. In the morning Lange, a member at Overbrook Golf Club, posted a 70 and in the afternoon he posted a 71 while starting from the 10th tee. His 141 score was two better than David Quinn (143). Another amateur, Michael McDermott, finished third at 144. Bill Sautter finished fourth with a 145. Stu Ingraham and Wilmington Country Club teaching pro Steve Madsen tied for fifth with 146s. As the low professional Quinn picked up the $4,400 first place check. The purse totaled $23,250.

The British Open was played at the Royal Troon Golf Club in Ayrshire, Scotland during third week of July. At the end of regulation play Todd Hamilton (71-67-67-69) and Ernie Els (69-69-68-68) were tied for the title at ten under par 274. The two pros then began the Open’s traditional four-hole playoff. Els played the four holes in one over par and when Hamilton managed four pars he was the Open champion. Phil Mickelson finished third at 275 and Lee Westwood was fourth at 278. Jim Furyk, who was exempt for the tournament as the 2003 U.S. Open winner, missed the cut. First prize was $720,000.

The Shawnee Open was held in the fourth week of July at the Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort. On Monday Dave McNabb, Stu Ingraham and John Appleget led the field with five under par 67s. Tuesday’s round was canceled due to weather but a sudden death playoff was held, which McNabb won with a birdie on the second extra hole. McNabb picked up a check for $1,375 and a bonus check for $500 for wearing the sponsor’s shirt. John Pillar, Bill Walker, David Quinn and George Frake tied for fourth with 68s.

Oakley, Pete 4 (TGH)
Pete Oakley

Pete Oakley had traveled to Europe in November to try and qualify for the European Senior Tour in hope that he might be able to join his brother David on that tour. Being in Europe for that tour paid off when he won the Senior British Open in the third week of July. In order to even play in the tournament he had to take part in a 132-man qualifying round two days before the event where he won one of the 20 allotted spots. The tournament was played at the Royal Portrush Golf Club’s Dunluce Course in Portrush, Northern Ireland. Oakley began with rounds of 73, 68 and 73 to take a one stroke lead into the final round. In the final round he was paired with Tom Kite and Mark James. In that round he made six birdies but when he made a bogey on the 16th hole he was in the lead by just one stroke. On the 18th hole Oakley’s second shot from the rough found a deep bunker fronting the green. Unable to see the flagstick he put his bunker shot ten feet past the hole. Always a great putter, Oakley stroked the putt right into the center of the hole. His prize was $295,212 in United States money, along with future exemptions and invitations. Among them was an exemption on the PGA Senior Tour for 2005 and a spot in the 2005 British Open. A five-year exemption on European Senior Tour was also a part of the spoils of victory. Kite and Eduardo Romero tied for second with 285 totals. James finished fourth at 286.  The purse was $1,868,130 in American dollars. The par 72 course measured 6,822 yards and the winds off the coastal waters always make the course quite difficult.

The U.S. Senior Open was played at the Bellerive Country Club in St. Louis, Missouri. Par was 71 and the course measured 7,117 yards. The course was wet when the tournament began on Thursday and early rain on Friday washed out that day’s play. In order to get back on schedule the third and fourth rounds were played on Sunday August 1. Even though everyone had to walk with caddies Peter Jacobson (272) came back from hip surgery to win with rounds of 65, 70, 69 and 68 to edge out Hale Irwin (273) by one stroke. Tom Kite, who had led by two strokes with a round to go, played the last four holes in four over par and finished tied for third with Jay Haas at 274. Pete Oakley tied for 37th at 290 and won $13,782. Jay Sigel tied for 54th at 296, winning $7,200. Ken Peyre-Ferry finished 58th at 298 and won $6,869. Ed Dougherty missed the cut and received a check for $750. Oakley was in the field with a last minute exemption for winning the British Senior Open just four days before. Sigel and Dougherty were exempt for having won a PGA Senior Tour event in the past three years along with other categories. Peyre-Ferry was in the field by making it through sectional qualifying.

When the Pennsylvania Open was played at the Pittsburgh Field Club in the second week of August most of the top money stayed in western Pennsylvania. Ryan Sikora, an assistant pro at the Edgewood Country Club, won the $10,000 first prize check with rounds of 67, 68 and 69. Sikora’s nine under par 204, won by four strokes over Bob Ford (208). Stu Ingraham and the defending champion Steven Wheatcroft tied for third with 209 totals. The purse was again $50,000 and Sikora won $10,000. The course measured 6,636 yards.

The PGA Championship was played at the Whistling Straights’ Straights Course in Kohler, Wisconsin during the second week of August. The par 72 course measured 7,636 yards. At the end of 72-holes Vijay Singe (67-68-69-76), Chris DiMarco (68-70-71-71) and Justin Leonard (66-69-70-75) were all tied with eight under par 280s. A three-hole playoff was held to determine the winner. Singe made his first birdie of the day on the first hole of the playoff and added two pars, which gave him a one stroke margin over DiMarco and Leonard. It was Singe’s second victory in the PGA Championship. Ernie Els and Chris Riley tied for fourth at 281. Jim Furyk, who was in the field for a number of categories, missed the cut. First prize was $1,125,000 and the purse totaled $6,250,000.   

Hertzog, Terry 2 (TGH)
Terry Hertzog

Terry Hertzog won the Philadelphia Section Championship at the Philadelphia Cricket Club during the third week of August. It was the second time Hertzog had won the Section Championship and it was his fifth major victory in the Section. The first round of the tournament was played on the club’s Wissahickon 6,805 yard par 70 course and the last two rounds were played on its 7,370 yard Militia Hill par 72 course. Philadelphia Section legend Robert “Skee” Riegel kicked off the tournament by hitting a ceremonial tee shot from the first tee of the Wissahickon Course before round one. The purse was $50,000. Hertzog (66-73-70) made three birdies and an eagle in the last round to come from three strokes off the pace and win. Hertzog’s five under par 209 was three better than John Pillar (212), who finished second. First prize was $5,750. David Quinn and Rich Steinmetz tied for third with 213s. The host professional was Terry McDowell. The Section Championship was also the qualifying event for the Eastern PGA Club Professional Championship. Based on the number of entries in the event, twenty-one spots had been allotted to the Section. Hertzog, Pillar, Quinn and Steinmetz picked up the first four spots. The fifth and sixth spots went to Dave Roberts (214) and Bill Sautter (214). Stu Ingraham and Tom Ryan tied for seventh and eighth at 215. Rob Shuey and Steve Madsen won the next two places with 217 totals. The eleventh through fifteenth places were won by George Forster, Sr., Orist Wells, Dave McNabb, Brian Kelly and Mike Grabosky who all posted 218s. Bill Walker won the sixteenth spot with a 219 total. Merion Golf Club assistant Graham Dendler and John Appleget grabbed the seventeenth and eighteenth places with 220s. Meadowlands Country Club professional John Cooper and Dick Smith, Jr. won the nineteenth and twentieth places with 221 totals. Adam Decker, who was a golf coach at Penn State University, tied with three others at 222 and won a playoff for the twenty-first spot.

The Whitford Classic was held near the end of August at the Whitford Country Club. On Sunday two pros were paired with two amateurs for a pro-am. The pros’ scores counted toward a two-day total. John Cooper led with a seven under par 65. The second round was canceled due to rain and Cooper was declared the winner. George Forster, Sr. and David Quinn tied for second with 68s. Rich Steinmetz, who had shot a 69 on Sunday, finished fourth.

The Ryder Cup was played at the Oakland Hills Country Club near Detroit, Michigan during the third week of September. In the three days there were two rounds of four-ball matches, two rounds of foursome matches and a round of singles on Sunday. The PGA of America team took a drubbing as they suffered the worst defeat in the history of the Ryder Cup. The only round they won was the Saturday morning four-ball matches where they gained one point more than they lost to the European team. Jim Furyk was a member of the team for the fourth straight time. Furyk was defeated in the three matches that he played in with a partner and he won his singles match. The final count was 18-1/2 points for European PGA and 9-1/2 for the PGA of America.

The Philadelphia Section held an open tournament for women at the Concord Country Club on the fourth Friday of September. Diane Rama, who had worked at the Hartefeld National Golf Club in 1996 and was now in Massachusetts, won with a 76. Ace Club assistant Linda Nevatt, DuPont Country Club assistant Jennifer Cully, Connecticut professional Suzy Whaley and amateur Cindy Skilton finished in a four-way tie for second with 77s. First prize was $700. There were thirty entries and the course was set up just over 6,000 yards.

The Philadelphia Section Senior Championship was played at the Radley Run Country Club in the fourth week of September. The tournament was also the qualifying event for the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship. Greg Farrow led all the way as he opened up with a 69 on Wednesday and added a 72 on Thursday. Farrow’s three under par 141 gave him the Section senior crown by three strokes. Laurel Creek Country Club professional John Tyrell finished second at 144 and Bob Hibschman was next with a 145. Don DeAngelis and Jim Masserio tied for fourth with 147 totals. The Section had eight places in the PGA Senior CPC to qualify for. The first five spots went to Farrow, Tyrell, Hibschman, DeAngelis and Masserio. Jimmy Booros and J.R. Delish won the sixth and seventh spots with 149s. The eighth and last spot went to Rick Osberg who finished at 150. Delish didn’t go to the tournament and Gary Hardin, who had finished tied for tenth at 152 got into the tournament as an alternate.

The Woodloch Springs Open was scheduled for the last Monday and Tuesday of September but due to heavy rain the second round was canceled. Rob Shuey and Lehigh Country Club professional Wayne Phillips led the first day as they posted 68s on the par 72 Country Club at Woodloch Springs. They were declared the co-winners. Overbrook Golf Club assistant Andy Watters finished third with a 69. Don DeAngelis, Rich Steinmetz, Vince Ramagli, David Quinn, J.R. Delish and Bill Sautter tied for fourth with 70s.

The Philadelphia Section had 21 members at the Eastern PGA Professional National Championship in late September. The tournament, which was hosted by the Turning Stone Resort’s Atunyote course in Verona, New York, concluded on the first Sunday of October. Craig Thomas (72-63-74-70) and Ron Philo, Jr. (73-69-71-66) tied for the title at nine under par 279. Thomas won the sudden death playoff with a birdie 4 on the first playoff hole, which was the 18th hole. First prize was $20,000. Michael Duel finished third at 283 and Mark Mielke was fourth at 284. Adam Decker posted a 287 and tied for 9th, winning $3,550. David Quinn tied for 14th at 288 and won $2,250. Stu Ingraham won $1,185 as he tied for 25th at 291. Rich Steinmetz finished at 292 and won $1,026 for a 32nd place tie. They all qualified for the PGA Professional National Championship as the top 35 made it. John Appleget shot a 293 and tied for 36th, which won $920. He then won a five-way sudden death playoff, which made him the first alternate. Steve Madsen (295) and Dave McNabb (295) tied for 48th and they each won $706. Dave Roberts (296) tied for 53rd and won $660. Graham Dendler (297) tied for 56th and won $610. Bill Walker (298) tied for 63rd and won $545. Rob Shuey (301) and Orist Wells (301) tied for 72nd and they each won $465. John Pillar (302) finished 76th and won $440. Tom Ryan (303) and Vince Ramagli (303) tied for 77th and each won $420. Ramagli had gotten in as an alternate. The purse totaled $153,750.

The Philadelphia PGA defeated the Golf Association of Philadelphia’s amateurs on the second Wednesday of October at Stonewall’s new North Course. There were twelve players on each team and two had to be seniors. In each pairing there were two pros and two amateurs. There were three points being contested in each group with a better-ball match and two singles matches. The team of Mark Sheftic-John Allen and the senior team of Gary Hardin-Don DeAngelis each won three points. The teams of Mike Moses-Dave McNabb and Barry Dear-Hugh P. Reilly each won two points. The team of Stonewall assistant Rob Bishop and Susquehanna Valley Country Club assistant Ryan Felty won one point. Mike Grabosky and Philadelphia Cricket Club assistant Steve Hudson were the other Philadelphia PGA team. The final score was eleven points for the PGA and seven for GAP. After fourteen years of matches the PGA led with twelve wins against one loss and one tie.  

The PGA Senior Professional National Championship was played in Port St. Lucie, Florida at the PGA Golf Club’s South course in the fourth week of October. Jim White (69-69-69-67) broke Ed Sabo’s tournament record by one stroke when he finished with a fourteen under par 274. Bob Ford finished second at 277. Don Reese, Butch Sheehan, Bill Schumaker and Mick Soli tied for third with 280s. First prize was $20,000 from the $285,000 purse. Gary Hardin, who was in the tournament as an alternate, tied for 26th at 288. Hardin earned a place in the 2005 PGA Senior Championship as the top 35 qualified. Jim Masserio tied for 58th at 294 and won $1,137.50. Greg Farrow, Jimmy Booros, Bob Hibschman, DeAngelis, Rick Osberg and John Tyrell missed the cut and they each received $300.

The Philadelphia Section Match Play Championship was played during the third week of October at the Concord Country Club. There weren’t quite enough players to fill the 64-man ladder so some of the players received first round byes. One of those was John Appleget who then won five matches and the tournament. In the finals Appleget put away George Frake by the count of four holes up with only three holes to go. To get to the final Appleget defeated Mark Sheftic two-down and Frake eliminated John Spina one-down in the semifinal. First prize was $1,500.  

The PGA Assistant Championship was played at the PGA Golf Club’s South Course on the last four days of October. In the past only the champion from each PGA Section plus a few special invitees had been invited to the tournament but this year there were 120 players in the field, with four coming from the Philadelphia Section. Kirk Satterfield (73-70-69-66) won by one stroke with a ten under par 278. V.J. Trolio finished second at 279. Jeff Martin and Dino Lucchesi tied for third with 280s. First prize was $9,000. The four from the Philadelphia Section all made the cut. Rich Steinmetz tied for 14th at 286 and won $1,350. Vince Ramagli tied for 44th at 294, winning $655. Tom Ryan shot 296 and won $595 for a 49th place tie. Bill Sautter (299) won $460 for a tie for 62nd. The total purse was $100,000. The course measured 6,964 yards.

The Section’s fall meeting was at the DuPont Country Club on the first Monday of November. The finance chairman, Leo DeGisi, reported that the Section had made the usual $50,000 contribution to its Reserve Fund and that there was now $285,000 in the fund. The Section also contributed $8,000 to the Variety Club for its charities. The Section’s junior tour had another successful year as 502 juniors had signed up for the program. There were another 22 six-to-nine year olds in a separate program and 20 girls in a girls-only program. The Section had run 56 events for juniors that year. Stu Ingraham was the “Player of the Year” for the third time. Rich Steinmetz and David Quinn finished in a tie for the DeBaufre Trophy with identical stroke averages of 70.31. In the 42 year history of the DeBaufre Trophy that had never happened before. Greg Farrow was the Robert ‘Skee’ Riegel Player of the Year”.

The PGA of America’s annual meeting was held in Amelia Island, Florida during the first week of November. It was an election year and Roger Warren was elected president without opposition. Brian Whitcomb was also unanimously elected vice president as he moved up from secretary. Jim Remy was elected secretary on the seventh ballot, which was a record for the number of rounds that it took to attain a majority of the votes. Tom Lehman was named captain of the 2006 Ryder Cup team. Executive Director Jim Awtrey announced that he would be retiring in late 2006 after 19 years in the position. Awtrey was the only PGA member to have held that job. Awtrey also announced the development of a PGA Village at Coyote Springs, Nevada, which was near Las Vegas. The plans for a PGA Village near San Antonio, Texas had been canceled. The delegates were informed that the number of PGA club professionals that would qualify for the PGA Championship through the PGA Professional National Championship would be reduced from 25 to 20 beginning with the 2005 championship. At the end of the meeting Leo DeGisi completed his three-year term on the board as the director for District II. Past national presidents Dick Smith, Sr. and Jack Connelly were in attendance. The Philadelphia Section was represented by their delegates Tom Carpus and Dick Smith, Jr.

Lewisburg’s Jason Bohn and West Chester’s Sean O’Hair qualified for the PGA Tour in the first week of December. The qualifying was held at the TPC Stadium Course and the PGA West Nicklaus Tournament Course in LaQuinta, California. They earned playing privileges by finishing in the top 30 at the PGA Tour qualifying school. O’Hair tied for fourth with rounds if 70, 71, 68, 72, 71 and 68 for a twelve under par 420. He also picked up a check for $26,500. Bohn tied for ninth with rounds of 71, 74, 71, 66, 69 and 70. His eleven under par 421 earned a check for $25,000. Bohn was exempt into the third and final round for being between 126 and 150 on the PGA Tour’s 2004 money list. O’Hair, who had no status, had to begin at stage one. He made it through stage one and stage two by finishing in the top 20 at each event. At stage two O’Hair made birdies on the last three holes to qualify right on the number. He had been to the qualifying school five times before 2004 without reaching the final stage. O’Hair said that when he sent in his check for the 2004 qualifying he had no thoughts of making it all the way to the PGA Tour that year. He only hoped to play well enough to earn some status on the PGA Nationwide Tour. Brian Davis was the low qualifier with a 415 total for the six rounds. Washington Crossing’s Jonathon Rusk had also survived the first two stages of qualifying and finished tied for 120th, which gave him conditional status on the PGA Nationwide Tour for 2005.   

Vijay Singe was the leading money winner on the PGA Tour with winnings of $10,905,166 in 29 tournaments. He was also the “PGA Player of the Year” and he won the Vardon Trophy with a stroke average of 68.84. Due to a bad wrist Jim Furyk only played in fourteen tournaments on the PGA Tour and his winnings were $691,675. He slipped to 116th on the money list. Jason Bohn finished 131st on the money list as he won $567,930 in 29 events. Tom Carter played in 35 tournaments and finished 158th on the money list winning $395,780. Because Bohn and Carter had finished out of the top 125 they were headed back to Q-School or the Nationwide Tour. As #131 Bohn did have some limited status on the PGA Tour for 2005.

Craig Stadler led the PGA Senior Tour money list as he won $2,306,066. Jay Sigel finished 31st with earnings of $593,815 in 28 tournaments. Pete Oakley won $342,990 in twelve tournaments, which put him in 49th place on the money list. Due to injuries Ed Dougherty played in only 13 tournaments and won $125,074. Ken Peyre-Ferry played in one tournament and won $6,869.

Rick Price played in 28 tournaments on the PGA Nationwide Tour and won $104,008, which was good for 57th place on the money list. Joe Daley won $25,414 in 16 events. Sean O’Hair managed to qualify for two tournaments and won $3,400. Jason Bohn played in one tournament and won $1,891. Chris Wisler won $1,316 in three events.


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2005
On March 4th the PGA Tour announced that the PGA Nationwide Tour’s Reese’s Cup Classic scheduled for the last week of May had been canceled. An $18-million renovation to the Hershey Country Club clubhouse and other club facilities was cited as the reason. The tournament had been a big success for eight years attracting nearly 40,000 spectators each year.

Micklewright, Peter (TGH)
Peter Micklewright

The Philadelphia Section’s spring meeting was hosted by the Philmont Country Club on the first Monday of April. The PGA members and apprentices were informed about a new initiative of the PGA of America called “Play Golf America Day”. The event was to be held at the Hartefeld National Golf Club on the second Saturday of May. The day, which was open to the public, would consist of introducing new golfers to the game, free instruction and the opportunity to test out the newest equipment from the leading golf companies. The Section officers also announced plans to help fund the Variety Club’s construction of a three-hole Astroturf golf course on the site of its camp. The plans for the course included a practice green and a 50-yard netted driving range. The estimated cost of construction for the wheelchair accessible course was $175,000. The Variety Club was the Section’s designated charity. The Variety Club’s Tournament of Champions, which had raised thousands of dollars for it charities, was now in its 30th year. Another bit of significant news was that a large pharmaceutical company had contributed $250,000 to the Section for its programs. In return the Section’s members would be distributing surveys to their members that would inform them of the dangers and symptoms of a stroke. One program that would benefit was the Section championship, which would have a guaranteed purse of $100,000. Section President Tom Carpus informed the members that Geoffrey Surrette’s contract had been extended for five years. The Section’s financial report showed a profit for 2004 of $78,755 and $512,229 in net assets as of the end of the year. The usual awards were presented to the Section’s leading professionals. Peter Micklewright, who had been the professional at the Blue Ridge Country Club since 1983, was the Section’s “PGA Golf Professional of the Year”. Eleven of his assistants had gone on to be head professionals. Micklewright was now the general manager at Blue Ridge as well as the golf professional. His title at Blue Ridge was COO and he had 110 employees under his supervision. For twelve years he ran the “Harrisburg Golf for Kids Day”. In 1995 he became a PGA Master Pro and his thesis was titled “Harrisburg Golf for Kids Days, PGA Clubs for Kids: A Formula for Success”. He was honored as the Section’s Junior Golf Leader in 1989 and 1992. Micklewright served on various Section and Chapter committees along with being the Chapter president.  

The Masters Tournament was held at the Augusta National Golf Club in early April, ending on the second Sunday of the month. Due to weather problems the first round didn’t begin until 1:30 p.m. In order to make the most of what was left of the day, the players were started off both #1 and #10 tees. Sixty-eight players did not complete their rounds. After round one was completed on Friday morning a two-tee start was used again for round two. The tournament was affected by weather again and play was halted for the day at 4:40 p.m. On Saturday, after the second round was complete, a two-tee start was used again for the third round. Forty-four players, which were most of those who had made the cut, were unable to finish before dark. Tiger Woods had trailed Chris DiMarco by six strokes after two rounds. Beginning with the seventh hole of the third round Woods made seven straight birdies but it took him more than two days to do it. Woods and DiMarco had to play nine holes of their third rounds on Sunday morning. When they began the last round Woods was leading DiMarco by three strokes and they were paired together. DiMarco proceeded to shot a four under par 68. It appeared like he might even win but Woods holed a chip shot from behind the 16th green and when play was completed he and DiMarco (67-67-74-68) were tied at 276, seven strokes in front of their nearest competitors. Woods (74-66-65-71) went on to win on the first playoff hole with a fifteen-foot birdie putt at #18. Luke Donald and Retief Goosen tied for third with 283 totals. Jim Furyk finished 28th at 291, winning $53,900. First prize was $1,260,000. Furyk was invited to the tournament under several categories but the most important one was for being a winner of the U.S. Open in the past five years.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held in the Philadelphia area at the Hartefeld National Golf Club on the second Thursday of May. The USGA had allotted seven qualifying spots to the field of 115 pros and amateurs who were entered at that site. Amateur Bryant Reeves led the field with a three under par 69. The other six spots went to Mike Moses, David Quinn, former Section member Scott Paris along with three amateurs; Patrick Rutter, James White and David Bradshaw. They all posted 72s.

On the second Saturday of May the Section held “Play Golf America” day at the Hartefeld National Golf Club. More than 500 people along with PGA of America past PGA Presidents Jack Connelly and M.G. Orender turned out for the event. “Play Golf America” had been Orender’s idea. Thirty of the Section’s golf professionals provided free lessons. Among other avenues the Section had promoted the day using the headline ticker display on the PECO Building in downtown Philadelphia.   

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Central Pennsylvania was held at the Wren Dale Golf Club on the third Tuesday of May. California professional Miguel Rivera led with a three under par 69. York’s Brandon Knaub won the second of the available three spots with a 70. The last spot went to amateur Shawn Hall with a 72.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at the Moselem Springs Golf Club on the third Thursday of May. Sean O’Hair was the medalist at Moselem Springs with a one over par 71. There were three spots at Moselem Springs. The other two spots were won by George Forster, Sr. and amateur Gregg Angelillo with 72 totals.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at the Glen Oak Country Club on the third Thursday of May. Bill Sautter grabbed the first of the two open spots with a four under par 68. John Pillar won the other spot with a 72.

The Senior PGA Championship was played at the Laurel Valley Golf Club in Ligonier, Pennsylvania in late May. After some near misses Mike Reid came through with a major victory but it wasn’t easy. Reid (70-70-70-70) made a three, which was an eagle, on the last hole to finish in a tie with Jerry Pate (70-68-72-70) and Dana Quigley (71-71-66-72) at eight under par 280. Then Reid made a birdie on the same hole to win a sudden death playoff and a check for $360,000. Morris Hatalsky finished fourth with a 284 total.  Pete Oakley tied for 70th with a 309 score and won $3,725. Ed Dougherty, Gary Hardin and Jay Sigel missed the cut. The total purse was $2,000,000. Oakley was exempt as the 2004 British Senior Open winner. Dougherty was exempt off his position on the PGA lifetime money list. Sigel was exempt as one of the top 31 money winners on the 2004 PGA Senior Tour money list. Hardin had qualified at the 2004 PGA Senior Club Professional Championship.

On the last Tuesday of May David Quinn won the Haverford Trust Classic at the Sunnybrook Golf Club for a second time. Each year the first prize was being increased by $2,500 and it was now $30,000. Quinn put together a four under par 32 on the front nine and then played the second nine in 35 strokes. His five under par 67 was two shots better than the rest of the field. Jimmy Booros, George Frake and Greg Farrow tied for second with 69s. After all the players had finished the sponsor announced that he would like to have a playoff for second place and that there would be an extra $1,000 for the winner. Frake wasn’t available for the playoff, but Farrow and Booros were. Farrow won the playoff on the second extra hole. The three players each won $3,050 for the tie for second and Farrow picked up the extra $1,000.   

Sectional qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at various locations, including overseas. No one from the Philadelphia Section made it through that second level of qualifying. Jim Furyk was exempt from local and sectional qualifying.  

The PGA Nationwide Tour Northeast Pennsylvania Classic qualifying event for Philadelphia Section members was at the Glenmaura National Golf Club on the fourth Tuesday of May. The Section had been given the usual three spots by the PGA Tour. John Pillar led with a one under par 70. Dave Roberts and Terry Hertzog picked up the other two spots with 72s.

The 30th annual Variety Club Tournament of Champions was played at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club in the second week of June. On Wednesday the pros were teamed up with amateurs in a pro-am that raised money for the Variety Club’s charities. The pros’ scores on Wednesday counted toward a two-day total. On Thursday only the pros played, competing for the individual money prizes. Brian Kelly shot a 67 the first day. With the course set up more difficult on the second day, he shot a 68 by making birdies on the last two holes. His nine under par 135 was two shots better than Barry Dear (137) who finished second. John Pillar was next at 138. Rich Steinmetz and Dave McNabb tied for fourth. The next night at the Variety Club Gala the Philadelphia Section presented the charity with a $90,000 check, which was earmarked for the construction of its three-hole golf course for handicapped children. At the same time the Philadelphia Section was honored at the Gala for its thirty years of support.

The U.S. Open was played on the Pinehurst Country Club’s Number 2 Course at Pinehurst, North Carolina in the third week of June. Par on the 7,115 yard course was reduced from 72 to 70. The USGA held qualifying rounds for the U.S. Open outside the United States for the first time. Michael Campbell qualified at Walton Heath Golf Club in Surrey, England and went on to win the tournament with four steady rounds of 71, 69, 71 and 69. His even par 280 gave him a two shot edge over Tiger Woods (282), who finished second. Tim Clark, Sergio Garcia and Mark Hensby tied for third at 285. First prize was $1,170,000. Jim Furyk tied for 28th at 291 and won $44,486. Furyk was in the field as a winner of the tournament in the past five years.   

The PGA Professional National Championship was played on The Ocean Course at Kiawah Island, South Carolina during the fourth week of June. Mike Small won with a one over par 289 which was the highest winning score in the 38 year history of the tournament. His rounds on the 7,355 yard course were 73, 76, 71 and 69. Travis Long (292) finished second, three shots back and Scott Spence was next at 293. Darrell Kestner was fourth with a 294. Rich Steinmetz tied for ninth at 297 and won $12,750. The top 20 qualified for the PGA Championship. David Quinn also made the cut as he tied for 55th at 308 and won $2,112.50. John Appleget, Stu Ingraham and Adam Decker missed the cut. First prize was $67,000 from a purse of $500,000. Steinmetz, Quinn, Appleget, Ingraham and Decker had qualified for the tournament at the 2004 Eastern PGA Club Professional Championship.

Open qualifying for the PGA Nationwide Tour Northeast Pennsylvania Classic was held at the Great Bear Country Club on the third Monday of June. There were seven places in the tournament up for grabs. Scott Parel and Justin Hicks led the field by four strokes as they posted six under par 65s. It took a score of 69 to qualify and there was a five-man playoff for the last three places. The course measured 7,025 yards.

The PGA Nationwide Tour’s Northeast Pennsylvania Classic was held at the Glenmaura National Golf Club in the fourth week of June. Greg Kraft (65-64-68-70) won with a seventeen-under-par 267. In the last round several players made a move to catch him but he had a large enough cushion to hold them off. Tim O’Neal finished second at 269. Bubba Watson was third at 270. Joe Daley and David Bradshaw tied for fourth with 272s. They each won $19,800. Tom Carter, Ted Tryba, John Pillar, Rick Price, Dave Roberts, host professional Cleve Coldwater, Terry Hertzog, Emlyn Aubrey and Jonathon Rusk missed the cut. The par 71 course measured 6,990 yards and the entry fee was $200. First prize from the $450,000 purse was $81,000. Daley, Carter and Price were exempt players on the Nationwide Tour. Tryba, Aubrey and Rusk had conditional status. Coldwater had a sponsor exemption. Pillar, Roberts and Hertzog had qualified in the Section’s qualifying event.  

The two-day Woodloch Springs Open was scheduled for the fourth week of June but due to rain it had to be reduced to one day. The Country Club at Woodloch Springs hosted the tournament and their professional, John Pillar, was declared the winner after posting a three under par 69. Stu Ingraham finished second with a 71. Don DeAngelis, Bill Sautter and Steve Hudson, who was now an assistant at the Gulph Mills Golf Club, tied for third with 72s. First prize was $2,100.

On the first Sunday of July Jim Furyk won the Western Open in Lemont, Illinois. Furyk opened with a seven-under-par 64 on the Cog Hill Golf & Country Club’s Dubsdread Course. Furyk then posted three steady rounds of 70, 67 and 70 to finish at 270, which was two better than Tiger Woods (272). Ben Curtis finished third at 275 and Billy Mayfair was next at 276. First prize was $900,000, which was eighteen percent of the $5,000,000 purse.  

Qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open was held at the Kennett Square Golf & Country Club on the first Wednesday of July. The site was allotted three spots. Gary Hardin took the first spot with a three under par 68. Amateur Chris Lange and Utah professional James Blair won the other two places with 69s. The course measured 6,342 yards.

The New Jersey Open was held at the Fairmont Country Club in the middle of July. Amateur Brian Komline won with rounds of 64, 70 and 72 for a ten under par 206. David Quinn tied for second with Brett Jones at 210. Derek McDonald and Bill Britton tied for fourth with 212s. First prize was $15,000. Quinn and Jones shared first and second money.  

O'Hair, Sean (TGH)
Sean O’Hair

On the second Sunday of July Sean O’Hair won the John Deere Classic at the TPC at Deere Run Golf Club in Silva, Illinois. After rounds of 66, 69 and 68 O’Hair teed off in the last round trailing by five strokes, but a six under par 65, which included a successful ten-foot par putt on the last hole, earned him his first win on the PGA Tour. His sixteen under par 268 was one better than Hank Kuehne (269) and Robert Damron (269). Mark Hensby, Wes Short, Jr. and J.L. Lewis tied for fourth at 270. First prize was $720,000. O’Hair’s 23rd birthday was the next day. The victory qualified him for the British Open, which was beginning four days later and he didn’t even possess a passport. With the help of two senators from Iowa O’Hair was able to secure a passport, but first he had to get a copy of his birth certificate.    

Tiger Woods won the British Open at the St. Andrews Golf Club’s Old Course, St. Andrews, Scotland in the middle of July. As he had done several times before Woods left the field in his wake. He started fast with a 66 and a 67. His last two rounds were 71-70 as he finished at fourteen under par 274. First prize in U.S. money came to $1,261,584. Colin Montgomerie finished second at 279. Fred Couples and Jose Marie Olazabal tied for third at 280. Sean O’Hair had gotten into the tournament at the last minute by winning the John Deere Classic. It wasn’t until late Tuesday before O’Hair had everything in order and was able to board a plane for Scotland. He arrived in time for one practice round and then amazingly he was able to tie for 15th at 283 and win $81,102 in United States money. Jim Furyk and Pete Oakley missed the cut. Furyk was in the field for having won the 2003 U.S. Open and Oakley was exempt as the 2004 British Senior Open winner.

Bohn, Jason 2 (TGH)
Jason Bohn

Jason Bohn picked up his first win on the PGA Tour as he won the B.C. Open in the third week of July. The tournament was played at the En-Joie Golf Course in Endicott, New York and it was the same days as the British Open. Bohn (64-68-66-66) scorched the course as he put together a twenty-four-under-par 264. The last round was nip and tuck all the way. In spite of his low scoring he just edged out four players by one stroke. John Rollins, J.P. Hayes, Ryan Palmer and Brendan Jones all finished at 265. Bohn won 540,000 from the $3,000,000.

Dendler, Graham
Graham Dendler

The Philadelphia Open was hosted by the Aronimink Golf Club on the third Wednesday of July.  Graham Dendler emerged the victor after putting together an even par 70 in the morning along with an afternoon 72. His day was saved by a one-putt bogey on the par three 17th hole, which his next to last hole. Dendler’s tee shot landed in a greenside bunker and his second shot sailed over the green and nearly out-of-bounds. From heavy rough he pitched back to within two feet and holed the putt. On the 18th hole Dendler reached the green in two shots and got down in two putts from 35 feet. There were a few portable leader-boards but with half of the field starting play on the back nine it was difficult to be sure what score was leading. As it turned out Dendler had led by three strokes with two holes to play. When it was all over his 142 total was one stroke better than John Pillar (143), who had led at the halfway point with a 68. Pillar’s 68 was the only sub-par round of the day. Stu Ingraham and amateur Clint Deibert tied for third at 144. Dendler took home a check for $4,900 from the $25,480 purse.

The two-day Shawnee Open was played at the Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort in the fourth week of July. Barry Dear took home the top prize of $1,600 by putting together a pair of five under par 67s. David Quinn and Huntingdon Valley Country Club assistant Dave Olexson tied for second with 135s. Rich Steinmetz and Bill Walker tied for fourth at 138.   

The U.S. Senior Open was held in Kettering, Ohio at the NCR Country Club’s South Course on the last four days of July. In the final round Allen Doyle (274) shot an eight under par 63 as he came from nine strokes off the lead to win. His first three rounds were 71, 67 and 73. Loren Roberts and D.A. Weibring tied for second at 275. Greg Norman finished fourth at 276. First prize was $470,000. Jay Sigel tied for 50th at 292 and won $8,850. Gary Hardin also made the cut as he tied for 54th at 293 and won $7,585. Pete Oakley missed the cut and received a check for $1,000. Sigel and Oakley were exempt off their positions on the PGA Senior Tour money list. Hardin was in the field through the sectional qualifying in the Philadelphia area.

Daley, Joe 4 (TGH)
Joe Daley

Whitemarsh Township’s Joe Daley won the PGA Nationwide Tour Wichita Open on the last day of July at the Crestview Country Club in Wichita, Kansas. Daily played solid golf and finished with two low rounds but he still had to go extra holes to win. After a 71 and a 67 he finished with two 65s for a sixteen under par 268. Shane Bertsch (65-71-67-65—268) and Daily went head and head in the last round as they both turned in 65s. Daily didn’t back down as he proceeded to birdie the first hole of the sudden death playoff for the win. First prize was $85,500, which moved him up to tenth place on the money list. Matthew Goggin finished third at 269. Jason Shultz and Charley Hoffman tied for fourth with 270s. The purse was $475,000.

The Philadelphia PGA Assistant Championship was held at the Spring Mill Country Club on the first Monday of August. Bill Walker put together two rounds of 68 and 71 for a five under par 139 to edge out Rich Steinmetz (140) by one stroke. Tom Ryan, who was now the teaching pro at The Springhaven Club, finished third with a 143 total. Riverview Country Club assistant Greg Meyer, Hartefeld National Golf Club assistant Chris Gray, Barry Dear, and Carlisle Country Club assistant Shayne Sakson tied for fourth with 146s. Walker, Steinmetz, Ryan and Meyer, who won a sudden death playoff for the fourth spot, qualified for the PGA Assistant Championship.

The Pennsylvania Open was held at the Sunnybrook Country Club in the second week of August. There were 132 professionals and amateurs in the starting field. As it had been for several years there was a $50,000 purse and first prize was $10,000. Most of the large checks ended up in the hands of pros from western Pennsylvania. Sean Farren (68-69-67) made six birdies on the last nine and came from four strokes back to win by one stroke with a twelve under par 204. Kevin Sheilds finished second at 205 and John Pillar was third with a 207 total. Robert McClellan and amateur Tyler Brewington tied for fourth at 208.   

Phil Mickelson won the PGA Championship in Springfield, New Jersey on the Baltusrol Golf Club’s Lower Course during the second week of August. Due to a thunderstorm on Sunday the tournament didn’t end until Monday morning as twelve players still had to complete their rounds. Mickelson needed a birdie on the par five last hole to win. His 3-wood second shot finished left of the green. Mickelson (67-65-72-72) flopped a wedge shot over a bunker to within two feet and holed the putt for a 276. Steve Elkington and Thomas Bjorn had makeable birdie putts to tie but failed to hole them. They tied for second at 277. Mickelson prepared for the tournament by playing two rounds with the host professional, Doug Steffen, in late July. He was the only player that asked Steffen for advice. Tiger Woods and Davis Love III tied for fourth at 278. Woods had completed his round on Sunday and flew home to Florida, having decided that his two under par score wasn’t going to win. Jim Furyk and Jason Bohn tied for 34th at 285 and they each won $31,917. Sean O’Hair tied for 59th and won $13,343. Rich Steinmetz missed the cut. First prize was $1,170,000 and the purse was $6,500,000. Furyk was in the field as the 2003 U.S. Open winner. Bohn and O’Hair were there as winners on the PGA Tour in the past twelve months. Steinmetz had earned his entry by finishing in the top 20 at the PGA Professional National Championship in June.  

Kelly, Brian 5 (TGH)
Brian Kelly

Brian Kelly won the Philadelphia Section Championship for a third time in the middle of August. The Burlington Country Club hosted the Section’s most important tournament, so there was no Burlington Classic played that year. There was a pro-am the day before the tournament kicked off. The pro-am winners and the winner of the Section championship were recorded as the Burlington Classic winners. Kelly’s first two rounds were 67 and 68 but he trailed Rich Steinmetz by two strokes. In the last round Kelly and Rob Shuey, who was now the professional at the Valley Green Golf Club, were paired together and in the end it came down to those two as to who would be the winner. Kelly made birdies on two of the last four holes for a 68 and Shuey failed to hole an eight-foot putt for a birdie on the last hole. That made Kelly the Section champion again with a seven under par 203. Shuey finished second alone at 204 and Steinmetz was third at 206. John DiMarco and Bill Sautter tied for fourth with 207 totals. First prize was $15,000 and the purse was $100,000. The host professional was Michael Mack. The Section Championship was also the qualifying event for the PGA Club Professional Championship. For the past eight years the PGA had held regional club professional tournaments, which then qualified players for the PGA CPC. The regional tournaments had now been eliminated. Based on the number of entries in the Section Championship, Philadelphia had been allotted twelve spots. Kelly, Shuey, Steinmetz, DiMarco and Sautter won the first five spots. John Appleget and David Quinn took the sixth and seventh places with 209 totals. George Forster, Sr. won the eighth spot with a 210. The ninth and tenth places were won by Greg Farrow and Orist Wells with 211 scores. There was a six-way tie at 212 for the last two spots, which John Spina and Tavistock Country Club professional Rich Hughart won in a sudden death playoff. Dave McNabb (212) and Stu Ingraham (212) were alternates and they got into the CPC in place of Kelly and Farrow who didn’t play.

Reading’s Rick Price won the PGA Nationwide Xerox Classic in Rochester, New York at the Irondequoit Country Club during the third week of August. The course wasn’t long at 6,720 yards, but it was tight and it suited Price. He (67-63-68-71) played steady golf for four days and when he putted out on the last green he was the winner with an eleven under par 269. Andrew Pratt finished second at 270. David McKenzie, Jeff Quinney and Scott Gardiner tied for third with 271s. The purse was $550,000. The win moved Price up to 26th on the money list for the year.

The Whitford Classic was played at the Whitford Country Club near the end of August. On Sunday two pros were paired with two amateurs in each group for a pro-am competition and the pros’ scores counted toward a two-day individual purse. David Quinn shot a 72 on Sunday and on Monday when the course was set up more difficult he shot a 65 to tie John DiMarco (68-69) at seven under par 137. Quinn then won the tournament by defeating DiMarco in a sudden death playoff. First prize was $3,500. Rob Shuey, Rich Steinmetz and Steve Madsen tied for third with 138s.

Qualifying for the PGA Senior Professional National Championship was scheduled for two days in the middle of September at the Deerwood Country Club. Based on the number of entries the Philadelphia Section had seven spots to qualify for. The first day, a Wednesday, had to be canceled due to bad weather and the event was shortened to one round. On Thursday, with the wet course playing longer than its 6,231 yards, the scoring was better than expected. Roger Stern made eight birdies and posted the low score, a six under par 64 to lead by two strokes. There was a $2,500 purse and the winner received $600. Greg Farrow and Rick Osberg won the second and third spots with 66s. Billy Ziobro took the fourth spot with a 67. The fifth and sixth places went to Jack Connelly and Gary Hardin as they finished with 68s. Mike Thompson, who was now teaching at the Golf Zone @ Irish Oaks driving range, shot a 70 and won the seventh spot in a sudden death playoff with J.R. Delish (70), so Delish was the first alternate. A Section senior championship was being held later that month and winner would also qualify for the Senior CPC. Farrow won the Section senior championship so that opened up a spot for an alternate to go to the tournament. Ziobro didn’t go to the Florida for the tournament and Delish, who was the first alternate didn’t go either, so two of the other alternates were able to go. Don DeAngelis, who had shot a 71 in the qualifier and Dan Haskell, who had shot a 72 were able to go to the tournament. Later the Section was awarded another spot and Tony DeGisi, who had qualified with a 73, went to Florida for the tournament also.   

The PGA Cup matches were played in the fourth week of September at the Kildare Club in County Kildare, Ireland. The match was a competition between a 12-man team from the PGA of America and a 12-man team from the PGA of Great Britain & Ireland. Rich Steinmetz had earned a place on the U.S. team via his ninth place finish at the PGA Professional National Championship in June. The matches were played with the same format that the Ryder Cup used. On each of the first two days there were 4 four-ball and 4 foursomes matches. On the third day there were twelve singles matches. Steinmetz won one match and lost two, which was indicative of the U.S. team’s result. The final score was Great Britain & Ireland PGA 15, US PGA 11. This was the 22 match between the two teams.

The Philadelphia Section PGA Senior Championship was held on last two days of September at the Northampton Country Club. On Thursday Greg Farrow shot a six under par 66 and he came back with a 70 to win the championship for the second straight year. His 136 total was seven strokes better than the field. Don DeAngelis, J.R. Delish and Billy Ziobro tied for second with 143 totals. First prize was $1,750 from a $9,000 purse. There were 44 entries.

The Philadelphia PGA and the Golf Association of Philadelphia squared off in their annual challenge match at the Tavistock Country Club on the second Friday of October. This was the fifteenth match between the two organizations and it ended in a tie for the second time. There were twelve players on each team and two had to be seniors. In each four-man pairing of two pros and two amateurs there were two singles matches and a four-ball match. The George Forster, Sr.-Dave Olexson team won three points. The Stu Ingraham-Steve Madsen team won two points. The team of Springfield Country Club professional Craig Susalka and Rivercrest Golf Club professional Jamie Komancheck won two points also. The Rob Shuey-John Appleget team and the senior team of Gary Hardin-Don DeAngelis each won one point. The other team was Greg Farrow-Barry Dear. The final tally was nine points for each team. The fifteen year series now stood at twelve wins for the PGA against one loss and two ties.   

The Philadelphia Section Match Play Championship was played at the Concord Country Club in the fourth week of October. There were 63 entries so only one bye was needed to complete the 64-man ladder. David Quinn, who was seeded first, received the bye. Two rounds of matches were scheduled for Monday, two for Tuesday and two more for Wednesday, but bad weather changed that. Monday went all right but the rain arrived on Tuesday. They were only able to complete a few holes of the morning round. On Wednesday morning Steve Madsen still had twelve holes to play in his match with Greg Farrow, which he managed to win one-up. Madsen then went up against Rich Steinmetz. He birdied the 18th hole to win that match two-up. Later in the day Madsen defeated Quinn by the count of 4&3, which made it a total of 45 holes for the day. Dave McNabb played even more holes on Wednesday. Early that morning he started his day on the seventh tee and he needed fifteen more holes to win that match as he chipped in for an eagle three on the third extra hole to defeat Barry Dear. Next McNabb played Mike Moses and that match went to the 18th green where he made a birdie to win. His day wasn’t done as he now had to play Brian Kelly. McNabb won that match one-up, which meant he had played 50 holes that day. That made if an all Delaware final. Madsen and McNabb who had won the Delaware Open earlier in the year, decided to play the finals on Wednesday, one week later. In the finals Madsen won the last two holes with pars to eke out a one-up victory for the title. First prize was $2,500 from a $12,500 purse.  

The PGA Assistant Championship was held in late October at Port St. Lucie, Florida. The site was the PGA Golf Club’s par 72 South Course. Kyle Flinton (69-68-70-75–282) won the tournament for a third time as he was the only player that finished the tournament under par. His second round of 68, was made possible by a back nine 29 that included a double-eagle on a par five and an eagle on the par four next hole. James Herman and Jaysen Hansen tied for second with 290s, eight shots back. Colin Amaral finished fourth at 291. The course measured 6,984 yards. The purse was $100,000 and Flinton won $9,000. Rich Steinmetz, Bill Walker, Greg Meyer and Tom Ryan missed the cut.

The PGA Senior Professional National Championship was scheduled for the third week of October but it had to be postponed due to Hurricane Wilma. The tournament was pushed back to the second week of November and was played in three days with two rounds coming on the last day. It was played in Port St. Lucie, Florida on the PGA Golf Club’s par 72 South Course. Mike San Filippo (69-70-71-70) and Darrell Kestner (70-69-71-70) ended up tied at 280. They halved the first playoff hole with pars and San Filippo grabbed the title with a par on the second playoff hole. First prize was $20,000 from the $285,000 purse. Bob Ford finished third at 282 and Rick Karbowski was fourth at 283. Don DeAngelis made the cut with a 295 and tied for 53rd, winning $1,197.50. Jack Connelly finished with a 296 total and tied for 57th, winning $1,137.50. Roger Stern, Gary Hardin, Greg Farrow, Mike Thompson, Rick Osberg, Tony DeGisi and Dan Haskell missed the cut.  

The Section’s fall meeting was at the Blue Bell Country Club on the fifth Monday of October, which was the last day of the month. It was an election year and Tom Carpus was completing his two-year term as president. Dick Smith, Jr. was elected without opposition. Jim Smith, Jr., who was not related to Dick, was elected vice president and Mark Anderson was elected secretary. There was a contest for the Director of Section Affairs between Lori Van Sickle, who had been put on the slate by the nominating committee, and Dan Haskell. Haskell was elected in a close vote. Mike Moses was elected to the position of Director of Tournaments. It was reported that the Section had raised $105,000 in contributions and pledges toward the construction of the Variety Club’s golf course for handicapped children. $50,000 had been contributed to the reserve fund, which now stood at $346,000. There had been 461 signed up for the Section’s junior tour that year. David Quinn was the “Player of the Year” and he won the DeBaufre Trophy with a scoring average of 70.0. The “Robert ‘Skee’ Riegel Senior Player of the Year” was Greg Farrow.   

DeBaufre, Tim 3 (TGH)
Tim DeBaufre

Great Bay Country Club director of golf Tim DeBaufre was inducted into the Philadelphia PGA Hall of Fame at the Section’s fall meeting on the last Monday of October. Tim DeBaufre’s father, Ed DeBaufre, was the professional at the Wildwood Golf & Country Club where Tim and his brother Tom learned to play golf. Tim attended Duke University where he played on an Atlantic Coast Conference championship team. He then served two years in the United States Coast Guard. Other than helping his father Ed at Wildwood, his first professional position was as an assistant to Tiny Pedone at the Overbrook Golf Club. The next year Tim moved over to the Philadelphia Country Club as an assistant under Loma Frakes and later that year he joined the PGA Tour under the sponsorship of Frakes and two of the Country Club members. For the next four years he bounced back and forth between the PGA Tour and the Country Club. In 1967 DeBaufre accepted the head professional position at the Cedarbrook Country Club. In his second year at Cedarbrook he won the Schmidt’s Festival of Golf, finished second in the Philadelphia Open, made the cut at the Philadelphia Golf Classic and he qualified for both the PGA Championship and the first PGA Club Professional Championship, making the cut in both of them. DeBaufre finished 41st in the PGA Championship that year. That fall Tim turned his head professional position at Cedarbrook over to his brother Tom, who had been his assistant and left for another shot at the PGA Tour. One year later he was back as the teaching assistant for his Duke teammate Ted McKenzie at the Waynesborough Country Club. In 1967 DeBaufre settled down as the professional at the Woodcrest Country Club for nine years before moving back to the Philadelphia Country Club where he stayed for 17 years. After leaving the Country Club he became the Director of Golf at the Greate Bay Country Club where he assisted with the design of Twisted Dune golf course. As a player DeBaufre won more than twenty professional open tournaments, which included the 1976 Philadelphia Open. DeBaufre qualified for the Club Pro Championship three times, making the cut twice. He was a member of five Schmidt’s Challenge Cup teams, which included the first two. In 1990 DeBaufre qualified for the PGA Senior Professional National Championship where he finished tied for 17th. DeBaufre qualified for the Philadelphia Golf Classic six times and made the cut twice. In 1964 Tim and his family donated the DeBaufre Trophy to the Section in memory of his father Ed, who had died that winter in an automobile accident. Each year the trophy was awarded to the Section member that finished the tournament season with the lowest scoring average. After being a member of the tournament committee for many years DeBaufre was elected first vice president and tournament chairman for three straight years beginning in 1978. During that period of time he took the Section’s purses from just over $100,000 a year to $265,000, an increase of more than 250 percent. In late 1980 DeBaufre was elected president of the Philadelphia Section and he was reelected the next year. He was the Section’s 23rd president. He was a delegate to the national PGA meeting four times. In 1990 DeBaufre was the Section’s “Golf Professional of the Year”.

McQuiston, Henry 3 (TGH)
Henry McQuiston

Bala Golf Club pro emeritus Henry McQuiston was inducted into the Philadelphia PGA Hall of Fame at the Section’s fall meeting on the last Monday of October. McQuiston grew up next to the Chester Valley Golf Club where his family lived. He and his two brothers played golf at Chester Valley and worked for the pro-green superintendent Dick Murphy. McQuiston graduated from West Chester State Teachers College in 1954 and then served two years in the United States Army. In 1958 he turned pro and worked at Chester Valley while playing some tournaments on the PGA Tour during the summer months. In 1960 he took the job as the assistant at the Bala Golf Club and two years later he became the head professional. In 1968 McQuiston finished in a tie for second in the Section Championship losing in a three-way playoff and in 1971 he was second in the Philadelphia Open losing a playoff. He qualified for the 1962 PGA Championship, the 1963 U.S. Open and the 1984 PGA Senior Championship. McQuiston qualified for the PGA Tour tournament at Whitemarsh Valley Country Club ten times and made the cut three times. McQuiston was a member of eleven Challenge Cup teams that competed against the Middle Atlantic Section. He qualified for the Professional National Championship four times and the Senior Professional National Championship once. In 1970 McQuiston and several other Section members built the Avalon Golf Club and operated it until they sold out in 1986. He was elected as the 20th president of the Section in 1973 and 1974 after having served as the second vice president for two years. McQuiston was the head pro at Bala for thirty-seven years after which he continued on as the pro emeritus at the club. In 2004 McQuiston’s name was added to the Section’s Senior-Pro-Junior-Pro Championship, which had been held at the Bala Golf Club for over 20 years. He was the Section’s “PGA Golf Professional of the Year” in 1997.

The PGA of America’s national meeting was held at the Hyatt Regency in Scottsdale, Arizona during the first week of November. For the first time the meeting was available through webcast. Even if a PGA member was not able to attend the meeting he could view it on his computer. Joe Steranka was introduced as the PGA’s new executive director, replacing the retired Jim Awtrey. Steranka had worked in sports management and had been with the PGA since the late 1980s Ryder Cup captain Tom Lehman addressed the delegates concerning the 2006 matches which were to be held in Ireland. Dick Smith, Sr. was honored at the meeting as a “Legend of the PGA”. Smith was recognized for contributions to the association and the golf industry by a PGA past president. The president of the USGA, Fred Ridley, addressed the delegates and spoke about the expanded alliance between the USGA and the PGA. The PGA paid tribute to Henry Poe, who had passed away earlier that year. His wife, Lillian, their two sons and Poe’s goddaughter Betsy King (LPGA star) were in attendance. A resolution presented by the Philadelphia Section that would have modified the classification of “Assistant Golf Professional” to include the word “Teaching” was defeated. The delegates from the Philadelphia Section were Tom Carpus and Dick Smith, Jr. Past president Jack Connelly and Smith, Sr. were seated with the past presidents. There were also alternate delegates from the Section in attendance along with the executive director Geoffrey Surrette.  

Reilly, Will 3 (TGH)
Will Reilly

Twining Valley Golf Club professional Will Reilly was honored at the PGA’s national meeting in November as the PGA’s national “Junior Golf Leader”. Reilly grew up in a golf family. His father, Hugh, Sr., leased golf courses and his mother coached a high school golf team. He and his brothers all worked at the golf courses. Since his teens Will, now 41, had been assisting junior golfers. He had spent countless hours teaching golf to the Special Olympics, First Tee and PAL programs. He had 75 to 80 kids in his Kids on the Hill program that spent eight weeks each summer learning the game at three different facilities. He also helped out with the Philadelphia PGA’s junior programs. In 2004 he guided the development of the Philadelphia PGA High School Coaches Summit to encourage high school golf. As the head professional at the family golf course, Twining Valley Golf Club, he employed many of the junior golfers he had gotten started in the game. His biggest attribute was that he always encouraged the juniors and was always there for support. Reilly was the Philadelphia Section Junior Golf Leader in 2003 and 2004.   

Tiger Woods was the “PGA Player of the Year” He won the Vardon Trophy with a stroke average of 68.66 strokes per round and he led the PGA Tour in money winnings with $10,628,024 as he played in 21 events. Jim Furyk played in 26 tournaments on the PGA Tour and finished fourth with earnings of $4,255,369. Rookie Sean O’Hair won $2,461,482 in the 29 tournaments that he entered and finished 18th on the money list. Jason Bohn got into 28 tournaments and won $1,888,568, which was good for 35th place. Ted Tryba played in two tournaments and won $10,437. O’Hair was the PGA Tour “Rookie of the Year”. He made the cut in 24 of the 29 tournaments that he entered and he won more money than all but one rookie had ever won.

Dana Quigley led the PGA Senior Tour with earnings of $2,170,258. Jay Sigel played in 25 tournaments and won $ 281,414, which left him in 56th place on the money list. Ed Dougherty won $243,900 in 22 tournaments and finished in 59th place. Pete Oakley won $192,293 in 26 events, which put him in 68th place on the money list. Gary Hardin won $7,585 in two tournaments.

Joe Daley won $188,073 in twenty tournaments on the PGA Nationwide Tour and finished 24th on the money list. Rick Price played in 26 tournaments and finished 29th on the money list with winnings of $162,102. Sean O’Hair played in just one event where he won $54,000. Tom Carter played in 24 tournaments and finished in 107th place with $40,571 in earnings. Jonathon Rusk got into 18 tournaments and won $11,217. Ted Tryba played in ten tournaments and won $4,084. Emlyn Aubrey played in seven tournaments and won $1,193.


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2006
The Masters Tournament was played at the Augusta National Golf Club in the first full week of April. Phil Mickelson won the tournament for the second time in three years. Mickelson (281) shot four steady rounds of 70, 72, 70 and 69 to win by two strokes. Tim Clark (283) holed out a greenside bunker shot on the last hole to finish on stroke in front of five other players. Jose Marie Olazabal shot a six under par 66 on Sunday, which was the low round of the tournament. He finished tied for third at 284 with Chad Campbell, Fred Couples, Retief Goosen and Tiger Woods. First prize was $1,260,000. Jim Furyk tied for 22nd at 291 and won $67,200. Jason Bohn tied for 39th at 295 and won $ 30,100. Sean O’Hair missed the cut and received a check for $5,000. Furyk was invited as a winner of the U.S. Open in the past five years. Bohn and O’Hair were there for having been in the top forty money winners on the PGA Tour during 2005.

Smith, Jim 2 (TGH) (2)
Jim Smith, Jr.

The Section’s spring meeting was held at the Blue Bell Country Club on the second Monday of April. Clark Luis sang the national anthem. The feature guest was former national executive director Jim Awtrey who had retired in 2005. Among other topics Awtrey stressed the financial importance of winning the Ryder Cup in order for it to remain of interest to the world of golf. Russell Oneck who had been one of the Philadelphia PGA’s Variety Club golf buddies told about what the program had meant to him. The Section’s finances were in good order as it had finished the 2005 year $75,332 in the black. $50,000 had been contributed to the Section’s reserve fund. The Philadelphia Section’s “PGA Golf Professional of the Year” was Jim Smith, Jr. Smith began his career as an assistant to Fred Phillips at the Riverton Country Club in 1991. After one year at Riverton he became the head professional at The Abington Club where he stayed five years. He was then Talamore @ Oak Terrace’s head professional for ten years and he had now just become the professional at the Philadelphia Cricket Club that spring. At Talamore Smith hired several well qualified teaching pros and created a golf school. Golf instruction became the focal point of the club. During his ten years at Talamore Smith hosted numerous tournaments, seminars and meetings for the Section. In the fall of 2001 Smith became a member of the Section’s board as a director and at the fall meeting in 2003 he was elected Director of Section Affairs. He was now the Section vice president, having been elected at the previous year’s fall meeting. While at Talamore, Smith had won awards for his creative merchandising, which led to his ideas being written up in the PGA Magazine.

On April 10 the PGA of America was 90 years old, having been founded on April 10, 1916.

Jim Furyk holed an eight-foot birdie putt on the 72nd hole of the Wachovia Championship to tie Trevor Immelman, who had just taken three putts from 50 feet on the same green, at twelve under par 276. The tournament was played at the Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte, North Carolina during the first week of May. Furyk (68-69-68-71) and Immelman (68-72-66-70) then returned to the 18th tee for a sudden death playoff. This time Furyk made a par putt from six feet to win the tournament and a check for $1,134,000. Adam Scott finished third at 280. Bill Haas and Lucas Glover tied for fourth with 281 totals. The course measured 7,442 yards and the purse was $6,300,000.

On the second Friday of May local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at the Coatesville Country Club. The USGA had allotted four spots to that site. Harbor Pines Golf Club teaching pro John Appleget led the field with a two under par 69. Harrisburg’s Jeff Daniels, who had won the Pennsylvania Open as a professional in 2001 and was now a reinstated amateur, took the second spot with a 71. Wayne’s Tug Maude (72), who was playing the professional mini-tours and amateur Tyler Brewington (72) won the third and fourth spots in a three-man sudden death playoff.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at the Golf Course at Glen Mills on the third Monday of May. There were six open spots to qualify for at Glen Mills. Plymouth Country Club assistant, Billy Mullen, and amateur Jeff Osberg, who was the son of Rick Osberg, won the first two open spots with one under par 70s. Philadelphia Cricket Club assistant Nate Sell, Jonathon Rusk and amateur Clint Deibert took the next three places with 71s. Christopher Gray (72) won a two-man sudden death playoff for the last spot. Rusk was off the PGA Nationwide Tour and back playing the mini-tours.   

On the third Tuesday of May the Williamsport Country Club hosted local qualifying for the U.S. Open. There were two places to qualify for at Williamsport. Huntsville Golf Club professional Michael Molino and Williamsport’s Michael Rinker, who was playing the professional golf mini-tours, wrapped up the two spots with three under par 68s.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at the Carlisle Country Club on the third Friday of May. There were two spots to qualify for at Carlisle. Outdoor Country Club assistant Brandon Knaub ran away from the field as he posted a five under par 66. Amateur Clayton Rotz won the other spot with a 71.  

The Senior PGA Championship was played in the fourth week of May at the Oak Tree Golf Club in Edmonds, Oklahoma. The tournament came down to a battle between Jay Haas and Brad Bryant. In the final round Haas (68-70-73-68) made five birdies on the front nine to take the lead but Bryant (69-67-72-71) finished with eagle-par-birdie on the last three holes. They finished regulation play tied at five under par 279. A sudden death playoff began on the 18th hole, which they continued to play until there was a winner. The third time they played the hole, Haas holed a 12-foot putt for a par after being in a greenside bunker and Bryant missed a four-foot par putt. That put the Haas name on the Alfred Bourne Trophy and a check for $360,000. Gil Morgan finished third at 281 and Dana Quigley was fourth at 282. Pete Oakley, who was playing the European Senior Tour, tied for 63rd at 301 and won $3,850. Ed Dougherty missed the cut and received a check for $1,000. In order to fill out the field Oakley and Dougherty were in the field on special invitations from the PGA. The course measured 7,102 yards.  

The Haverford Trust Classic was held at the Sunnybrook Golf Club on fifth Tuesday of May. The tournament had the largest first prize in the Section and each year it was being increased by $2,500. Paul Oglesby put together a five under par 67 and won the $32,500 first prize by one stroke. The defending champion, David Quinn, finished second with a 68. Rich Steinmetz, Michael Mack and an assistant at The Golf Course at Glen Mills, Anthony Napoletano, tied for third with 69s.  

No one from the Philadelphia Section made it through the sectional qualifying for the US Open in early June. Jim Furyk and Sean O’Hair were exempt.

Qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open was held at the Doylestown Country Club on the second Friday of June. The USGA had allotted two spots to the Doylestown site. Reinstated amateur and former Philadelphia Section champion Andy Thompson was the low qualifier with an even par 72. George Forster, Sr. shot a 75 and won the other spot in a three-man sudden death playoff with a birdie on the sixth extra hole.

The two-day Variety Club Tournament of Champions was held at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club in the second week of June. On Tuesday the pros were paired with amateurs in a pro-am that raised money for the Variety Club charities. The individual pro scores counted toward the two-day total. On Wednesday the pros were paired together. Rich Steinmetz won with 69-70 for a five under par 139. Barry Dear, Paul Oglesby and Tom Ryan tied for second with 140s. The prize money totaled $36,000 and Steinmetz’s first prize was $7,500.  

The U.S. Open was played during the third week of June on the Winged Foot Golf Club’s West Course in Mamaroneck, New York. Several players could have won but when the last putt had been holed out Geoff Ogilvy (71-70-72-72) was the winner with a 72-hole five over par 285. First Jim Furyk made a bogey on the 15th hole and then after playing a great shot from a greenside bunker on the 18th hole, his five-foot par putt lipped out. That left him with a 286 total. Then after making a birdie on the 17th hole Colin Montgomerie three-putted the 18th hole for a double-bogey and a total of 286. Next came Ogilvy who holed out a 30-foot chip shot for a par on the 17th hole and then after making a great pitch shot on the last hole he made a six foot putt for another par and a 285 total. After all that, Phil Mickelson arrived on the 18th tee with a one stroke lead even though he had made a bogey on the 16th hole. He hit a 3-wood off the tee and sliced it into heavy rough near the hospitality tents. Instead of chipping out he went for the green and hit a tree, leaving his ball in the rough about 25 yards from where he had just played. His third shot plugged in a greenside bunker. His bunker shot rolled across the green into the rough from where he chipped back to eight feet and holed the putt for a six and a 286 total. So, Furyk, Montgomerie and Mickelson tied for second. While all that was happening Padraig Harrington made bogeys on each of the last three holes and finished fifth at 287. Furyk won $501,249. Sean O’Hair tied for 26th at 293 and won $52,341. The total purse was $6,250,000 and Ogilvy won $1,225,000. The course measured 7,264 yards. Furyk was in the field with a ten-year exemption for winning the 2003 U.S. Open and O’Hair was there off having finished in the top 30 money winners on the 2005 PGA Tour.

Rich Steinmetz won for the second time in less than one week by capturing the Burlington Classic in the third week of June at the Burlington Country Club. On Sunday two pros and three amateurs were paired together for a pro-am tournament, which also counted as the first round toward the professional event. On Monday the pros were paired together for the last round of the tournament. Steinmetz put together a 67 and a 69 for four under par 136. Stu Ingraham finished second at 138. Mark Sheftic and Mike Moses tied for third with 139 totals.  

The PGA Professional National Championship was held at the Turning Stone Resort & Casino in Verona, New York during the fourth week of June. Two of Turning Stone’s three golf courses, Shenendoah and Atunyote, were used for the tournament which was the qualifying event for the PGA Championship. The tournament came down to a tie between Ron Philo, Jr. (68-71-71-68) and Alan Schulte (67-69-71-71) who finished with ten under par 278 totals. In the sudden death playoff they halved the first two holes with pars and Philo then won the tournament on the third extra hole with a bogey. Lee Rinker finished third with a 280 total and Mike Small was fourth with a 281. First prize was $75,000. Rich Steinmetz tied for 40th at 290 and won $2,833.75. John Appleget tied for 48th at 291 and won $2,347.50. The 312-man field was cut to the low 90 after 36 holes and it took an even par 144 to survive. Orist Wells, Dave McNabb and John Spina, who was now a teaching pro at the Philadelphia Cricket Club, posted 145s to miss the cut by one stroke. Rich Hughart, Rob Shuey, John DiMarco, Bill Sautter, Stu Ingraham, David Quinn and George Forster, Sr. missed the cut. Shuey was now a teaching pro at Ben’s Power Golf driving range. They had all qualified at the 2005 Section championship except for Steinmetz who was exempt off his finish in the 2005 tournament. McNabb and Ingraham were alternates and had replaced Brian Kelly and Greg Farrow who didn’t go to the tournament. Terry Hatch was also in the tournament. He had worked in Maine during most of 2005 and qualified in the New England Section. Hatch was back in the Philadelphia Section as a teaching pro at the Hidden Valley Golf Club.   

In the fourth week of June host professional John Pillar, won the Woodloch Springs Open for the second straight year. The tournament had been scheduled for two days but Monday’s round was rained out and the tournament was reduced to one round. Pillar won with a three under par 69. He had won the tournament the year before with a 69 after one round had been rained out. Bill Sautter and Mark Sheftic tied for second with 70s. David Quinn finished fourth with a 71.

Section qualifying for the PGA Tour Northeast PA Classic was held at Glenmaura National Golf Club on the first Thursday of July. There were three spots. David Quinn was low with a three-under-par 68. John Pillar and Terry Hatch wrapped up the other two places with 71s.

The U.S. Senior Open was played at the Prairie Dunes Country Club in Hutchinson, Kansas. On the second Sunday of July the defending champion Allen Doyle was paired with local favorite Tom Watson, who he trailed by two strokes. Watson missed some short putts and Doyle didn’t miss many putts of any length. When it was all over Doyle (69-68-67-68) had shot his fourth round in the 60s, which no one else did, and he had won by two strokes with an eight under par 272. He set a record by being the oldest to win the tournament. Watson finished second at 274. Bruce Lietzke and Peter Jacobson tied for third with 275s. Pete Oakley and George Forster, Sr. missed the cut. First prize was $470,000. Oakley was exempt as a winner of the British Senior Open in the past three years and Forster had made it through the sectional qualifying. The entry fee was $150 and there were 2,729 entries.

Jason Lamp, who had won the Philadelphia Section Championship and the Philadelphia Open in 1998, won the New Jersey Open in the second week of July. The tournament was played at the par 71 Hollywood Golf Club, which was just one mile from the Deal Golf Club where Lamp was now the head professional. Lamp shot three straight 70s on the difficult 7,010 yard course to win by one stroke over Mark Schaare (211). Former champion, Greg Farrow, finished third at 212. Brian Gaffney, Frank Esposito and James Herman tied for fourth at 215. First prize was $15,000.  

David Quinn won the Philadelphia Open on the third Wednesday of July at the Llanerch Golf Club. The golf course had been recently renovated and lengthened to 6,716 yards with the par reduced from 72 to 71. The 60 player field began play for the 36 holes of golf on both the first and tenth tees. Quinn started on number one and proceeded to make bogeys on three of the first four holes. He finished the round in 70 strokes and came back with a 69 in the afternoon, which left him tied for the top prize with Philadelphia Country Club assistant Mike Ladden at 139. Ladden had finished his first round with a birdie on the 17th hole and a holed out wedge shot for an eagle two on the 18th hole, which gave him a 69. He then began his afternoon round with a birdie on the tenth hole and shot a 70 for a total of 139. For the first time in the 102 year history of the tournament a playoff was held that was not 18 holes in length. This time a four-hole playoff was instituted with holes 1, 2, 3 and 18 being used. In the playoff Ladden took the early lead with a birdie but from there on it was bogey-bogey-par. Quinn made a par on the first hole and a birdie on the next hole to take the lead. He then made pars on the next two holes to win the playoff by two strokes. Amateur Kyle Davis finished third at 141. Barry Dear finished fourth with an even par 142. The total prize money came to $25,380 and first prize was $5,000. Quinn won wearing shorts. The professionals always wore pants when competing in their tournaments but the Philadelphia Open was the Golf Association of Philadelphia’s tournament and they allowed the players to wear shorts.

On the fourth Sunday of July Tiger Woods won the British Open for a third time. The tournament was played at the Royal Liverpool Golf Club in Hoylake, England. The golf course was dry and playing fast so Woods only hit his driver one time in 72 holes, using his irons to tee off on most holes. Woods’ rounds were 67, 65, 71 and 67 for an eighteen under par 270. Chris DiMarco finished second at 272. Ernie Els ended up in third place with a 275 and Jim Furyk was fourth at 276. Woods won $1,338,480 and Furyk won $390,390. Sean O’Hair tied for 14th at 281 and won $105,033. Furyk was exempt as a winner of the U.S. Open in the past ten years and O’Hair was in the field for being among the top 30 money winners on the 2005 PGA Tour.

Quinn, David (TGH)
David Quinn

Seven days after winning his first major championship in the Philadelphia Section, David Quinn won a second major title. His win came at the Philadelphia Section championship at the Hartefeld National Golf Club in the fourth week of July. In the third and last round Quinn played the front nine in five under par and later he birdied the last two holes to shoot a seven under par 65. That allowed him to come from a four-way tie for sixth and five strokes back to win. His first two rounds were 68-73 and with the last round 65 he finished at 206, one stroke in front of the field. Rob Shuey birdied the last hole to finish second at 207. Rich Steinmetz, who finished with bogies on the last two holes, ended up in third place at 208 and Dick Smith, Jr. was fourth at 209. First prize from a purse of $75,000 was $10,000. The host professional was Patrick Shine. The Section Championship was also the qualifying event for the PGA Club Professional Championship. Based on the number of entries in the Section Championship there were nine spots to qualify for. The first four went to David Quinn, Rob Shuey, Rich Steinmetz and Dick Smith, Jr. Stu Ingraham and Paul Oglesby won the fifth and sixth spots with 210 totals. The last three spots were wrapped up by John Appleget, Graham Dendler and Terry Hertzog as they finished with five under par 211 totals. Alternates Jason Panter (212), who was the professional at the Stone Harbor Golf Club, and Dave McNabb (213), got into the tournament as well.        

The Philadelphia PGA Assistant Championship was held at the Spring Mill Country Club on the first Monday of August. Rich Steinmetz won the tournament for a second time as he put together two great rounds of 66 and 66 for a twelve under par 132. Wyoming Valley Country Club assistant Kris Rudy led after the morning round with a 65 but an afternoon round of 71 left him four shots back in second place at 136. Mark Sheftic finished third with a 138 total and Philmont Country Club assistant Andy Fisher was fourth at 140. Steinmetz, Rudy, Sheftic and Fisher qualified for the PGA Assistant Championship, which was being held at the PGA Golf Club in Florida during October.  

The 90th Pennsylvania Open was held at the Nemacolin at Woodlands Resort’s 7,049 yard Mystic Rock Course in the middle of July. Very few of the professionals from eastern Pennsylvania took home large checks but one of their amateurs won the tournament. The winner, Kyle Davis, a 20-year-old sophomore to be at the University of Central Florida and a member at the Inniscrone Golf Club, was having a fantastic summer. In the last five weeks Davis had won the GAP championship, qualified for the U.S. Amateur, finished second in the Pennsylvania Amateur and third in the Philadelphia Open along with shooting a 60 in the Eastern Amateur, which helped him to finish fifth. Davis (70-71-69) birdied two of the last three holes for a six under par 210. That was good for a four stroke margin of victory over the defending champion Sean Farren (214) who picked up the top check of $10,000. Butler Country Club assistant Robert McClellan and Butler amateur Jon Pratkanis tied for third at 215. The low professionals from the Philadelphia Section were Rich Steinmetz, Mark Sheftic and Jim Thorpe’s Geoffrey Kelowitz, who was playing the mini-tours. They tied for sixth at 217. The field was cut after two rounds and it took a score of 150 to play in Wednesday’s last round. The total purse was again $50,000.    

Due to the number of entries, open qualifying for the PGA Nationwide Tour Northeast Pennsylvania Classic was held on the second Monday of August at two sites. There were seven spots in the tournament available at each location. Emlyn Aubrey and Dave Narveson led the field at the Great Bear Golf & Country Club with five under par 66s. Barry Dear finished third with a 67. Five players with 69s played off for the last two spots. The other site for qualifying was the Pocono Farms Country Club. Stephen Marino and Brock Mackenzie were low there with five under par 67s. Two players with 71s played off for the seventh spot.

The PGA Nationwide Tour Northeast Pennsylvania Classic was played at the Glenmaura National Golf Club during the third week of August. The tournament started the day after the Pennsylvania Open ended. Craig Bowden shot an eight under par 63 in the last round and came from seven shots back to catch the leader Jess Daley, who birdied the last hole to salvage a tie for first. They finished even with 16 under par 268s. In a sudden death playoff Daley (64-71-63-70) missed a four-foot par putt and Bowden (69-69-67-63) made a par to win the $85,500 first prize. Bryce Molder and Brad Adamonis missed birdie putts on the last green that would have put them in the playoff and had to settle for a third place tie at 269. Joe Daley tied for 23rd at 276 and won $4,560. Tom Carter tied for 59th at 287 and won $1,436.87. John Pillar, Emlyn Aubrey, Terry Hatch, Barry Dear, the host professional Cleve Coldwater and Billy Mullen missed the cut. The total purse came to $475,000. Daley and Carter were on the Nationwide Tour. Aubrey and Dear had qualified at the Monday qualifier. Coldwater had an exemption from the sponsor. Pillar and Hatch had qualified at the Section’s qualifier. David Quinn had also qualified in the Section qualifier but he didn’t play in the tournament. Mullen took his place.

Tiger Woods won the PGA Championship for a third time in the third week of August. The tournament was played at the Medinah Country Club’ No. 3 Course in Medinah, Illinois. Woods was tied for the lead with one round to play, but in the end it wasn’t close. Woods (69-68-65-68) shot a four under par 68 on Sunday and finished five strokes in front of the field at 270. It was the fifth major championship that Woods had won by five or more strokes. The 2003 winner, Shawn Micheel, finished second at 275. Luke Donald, Sergio Garcia and Adam Scott tied for third with 276 totals. First prize was $1,244,000 and the total prize money came to $6,800,000. Sean O’Hair finished with a 280 total and tied for 12th, winning $134,500. Jim Furyk tied for 29th at 285 and won $41,100. Jason Bohn missed the cut and received a check for $2,500. O’Hair, Furyk and Bohn were in the field for being in the top 70 money winners on the PGA Tour since the 2005 PGA Championship. Furyk was also exempt for having been on the most recent Ryder Cup Team and for winning a tournament on the PGA Tour since the last PGA Championship.  

In the fourth week of August the Whitford Classic had its most exciting conclusion in the more than forty years of its existence. As always it was held at the par 72 Whitford Country Club with a pro-am consisting of two pros and two amateurs in each pairing. On Monday it was just the pros and a few of the low scoring amateurs playing the second 18 holes. Greg Farrow (67-70), Jim Masserio (65-72) and Rob Shuey (67-70) all completed the 36 holes of regulation play with 137s. A sudden death playoff was held and Farrow proceeded to hole out his second shot from 107 yards for an eagle two for the win. Dave McNabb and Vince Ramagli tied for fourth one shot off the pace with 138s.

Jim Furyk shot a last round 65 in cool windy conditions and came from two shots back to win the Canadian Open on the second Sunday of September. The tournament was played at the Hamilton Golf and Country Club in Ancaster, Ontario. Furyk (63-71-67-65) finished with a fourteen under par 266 to edge out Bart Bryant (267) by one stroke. Sean O’Hair finished third at 268 and won $340,000. Brett Quigley was next at 269. Furyk won $900,000 from the $5,000 purse.

The Philadelphia Section Senior Championship was played at the North Hills Country Club in the second week of September. There were 27 entries and the winner was guaranteed a spot in the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship. Jim Masserio began poorly with a 76 on Tuesday but he came back strong with a 66 on Wednesday to finish at even par 142 and tied for the title with Bill Sautter (71-71). The two seniors headed to number one tee for a sudden death playoff. Both players made par fours on the first hole. On the par five second hole both players were on in regulation with Masserio slightly away. Masserio holed his twelve-foot putt and Sautter missed from ten feet. It was the second time Masserio had won that championship, his other being 1999. First prize was $1,300. The host professional Ron Rolfe and George Forster, Sr. tied for third with 144 totals. The total purse was $6,000.

The two-day Shawnee Open, which was scheduled for the third week of September, had to be canceled. A violent storm took out the main bridge that connected the island, where three holes and the hotel were located, to the rest of the other golf holes. The Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort’s had three nine-hole courses, but only one of the 27 holes finished at the hotel. When that bridge went out there was no golf to be played at Shawnee.     

Qualifying for the PGA Senior Professional National Championship was held at the Medford Lakes Country Club in the third week of September. Based on the number of entries the Section had five spots to qualify for along with the Section senior champion, Jim Masserio, who had already earned his spot. Bill Sautter was the medalist by two strokes with a 71 on Wednesday and a 67 on Thursday for a four under par 138. Cleve Coldwater and George Forster, Sr. picked up the next two spots with 140 totals. Bob Hibschman, who was now the pro emeritus at the Manufacturers Golf & Country Club, won the fourth place with a 143 and Jimmy Booros took the fifth and last place with a 144 total. Frank Palumbo shot a 145 and won the first alternate spot in a sudden death playoff with Jim Muschlitz (145). Masserio didn’t go to Florida for the Senior CPC so Palumbo played there in place of him. Later the Section was awarded another spot and Muschlitz, who was the professional at the Southmoore Golf Club, got into the tournament.    

The 36th Ryder Cup match, which was contested between the PGA of America and the European PGA, was held at the Kildare Club in Straffan, Ireland during the fourth week of September. There were twelve players on each team. The first two days there were four four-ball matches in the morning and there were four foursome matches in the afternoon. On the last day, Sunday, there were 12 singles matches. As the case had been in recent years the European team was superior in each style of play. The four sessions on the first two days ended with the Europeans winning 2-1/2 points to 1-1/2 for the USA. The Europeans dominated the singles matches as well, winning 8-1/2 points to 3-1/2 for the USA. Jim Furyk was playing in his fifth straight Ryder Cup. He played in all five sessions, winning two points and losing three. The final tally was 18-1/2 points for the Europeans and 9-1/2 for the PGA of America, which was exactly what it had been in 2004. The American team had now won 24 times against ten losses and two ties.

For the second straight year the Philadelphia PGA team was held to a tie by the Golf Association of Philadelphia’s team in their challenge match. The match was played at the Moselem Springs Golf Club on the second Tuesday of October. There were twelve players on each team and each team had at least two senior members. The players were paired in fours with two players from each team. In each pairing there were two singles matches and a better-ball match. The PGA teams of Stu Ingraham-Rich Steinmetz and Mark Sheftic-Rob Shuey each won the maximum three points. The Vince Ramagli-Jason Panter team won 1-1/2 points. The Mike Ladden-Bill Sautter and Dave McNabb-George Forster, Sr. teams, along with the senior team of Don DeAngelis-Gary Hardin each won 1/2 point. Each team won nine points. The results for the sixteen years of matches now stood at twelve victories for the Philadelphia PGA against one loss and three ties.  

The Senior PGA Professional National Championship was played at the PGA Golf Club in Port St. Lucie, Florida during the third week of October. The tournament was held on what had been named the North and South courses. They were now the Ryder Course and Wanamaker Course. The tournament ended in a three-way tie as Jeff Coston (71-65-65-70), Chris Starkjohann (67-68-67-69) and John Mazza (70-65-69-67) finished with seventeen under par 271 totals. There was a sudden death playoff. Mazza went out on the first hole with a bogey and Coston won the tournament with a birdie on the second extra hole. The 271 scores were tournament records. Kim Thompson finished fourth at 276. George Forster, Sr. tied for fifth at 277 and won $8,400. By finishing in the top eight Forster qualified for next year’s tournament and by being in the top 35 he qualified for the Senior PGA Championship. Jimmy Booros also made the cut and tied for 72nd at 292 winning $985. Frank Palumbo, Bob Hibschman, Bill Sautter, Cleve Coldwater and Jim Muschlitz missed the cut and they each received checks for $300. The total prize money was $285,000 and the winner earned $20,000.

The Cavaliers Country Club hosted the Section Match Play Championship during the fourth week of October. There were 51 entries and thirteen received byes to fill out the 64-man ladder. Two 18-hole matches were played each day from Monday through Wednesday until there was a winner. The tournament came down to a matchup of Rich Steinmetz and Stu Ingraham in the finals. In the semifinals Steinmetz had to birdie the last two holes to defeat John Spina one-down and Ingraham had eliminated Steve Madsen by the same one-hole margin. In the finals Steinmetz and Ingraham stood on the 18th all even. Steinmetz’s tee shot was headed out of bounds but it hit a tree and stayed in play. He then played a low shot from 140 yards out of the trees to three feet of the hole. Ingraham missed a birdie putt from fifteen feet and Steinmetz holed out his putt to win.   

The PGA Assistant Championship was played at the PGA Golf Club in Port St. Lucie, Florida at the end of October. The tournament was held on the 7,029 yard Ryder Course. Brad Lardon (72-67-67-72) won by two strokes with a fourteen under par 274. Faber Jamerson finished second at 276. Kyle Flinton and Grant Masson tied for third with 279s. Kris Rudy tied for fifth at 281 and won $2,900. Rich Steinmetz tied for 32nd at 289, winning $745. Andy Fisher also made the cut and tied for 44th at 291, winning $635. Mark Sheftic missed the cut and received a check for $300. First prize was $9,000.

The Section’s fall meeting was hosted by Talamore at Oak Terrace on the fifth Monday of October. It was not an election year but the Director of Tournaments, Mike Moses, had resigned so an election was needed to fill the position. John Pillar was selected by the board and he was elected without opposition. The director from District II was in attendance and he reported on national affairs. The Section’s junior tour had another successful year. Fifty-five events were held with 496 juniors enrolled in the program. The Section’s reserve fund was now worth $392,000. The Section had raised $250,000 for the construction of the Variety Club’s golf course for handicapped children. The Section’s “Player of the Year” was Rich Steinmetz. Stu Ingraham won the DeBaufre Trophy with a scoring average of 69.77 in the 15 designated rounds. George Forster, Sr. was the Robert ‘Skee’ Riegel Senior Player of the Year”. Ted McKenzie was inducted into the Philadelphia Section PGA Hall of Fame at the meeting.

McKenzie, Ted 6 (TGH)
Ted McKenzie

Ted McKenzie was inducted into the Philadelphia Section’s Hall of Fame on the fifth Monday of October at the Section’s fall meeting. McKenzie learned to play golf at the Waynesboro Country Club where his father Paul was the pro and green superintendent. It seemed like everyone in his family was in the golf business. His uncle, Arthur Edgar was the pro at the Chambersburg Country Club and his cousin Jim Edgar was the pro at two clubs in the Section. Ted’s godfather Dick Sleichter won the Section Championship while serving as the professional at the Gettysburg Country Club. Ted’s brother Mike became a green superintendent and his other brother David was the professional at the Old York Road Country Club for over 25 years. One of his sons, David, worked as an assistant in the Section and his daughter Carolyn won a Women’s Golf Association of Philadelphia Girl’s Championship and two WGAP championships before becoming a head professional in Florida. Ted won the Pennsylvania State High School Championship in 1957 and went to Duke University where he graduated in 1962. He turned pro in 1961 and in 1962 he returned to the Philadelphia Section as an assistant at the Aronimink Golf Club. After five years at Aronimink McKenzie became the head professional at the one-year-old Waynesborough Country Club where he stayed for 23 years. After leaving Waynesborough he was instrumental in locating a piece of ground and putting together a group of founding members to form a new golf club called Stonewall where he served as the professional. For over 20 years McKenzie was one of the leading players in the Section. He had two major wins in the Section, the 1971 Philadelphia Open and the 1979 Philadelphia PGA Championship. In 1975 he was the Section’s “Player of the Year” and he also won the DeBaufre Trophy for the lowest scoring average. During his career he qualified for two U.S. Opens, seven PGA Club Professional Championships and a PGA Senior Club Professional Championship. In the first thirteen years of the Challenge Cup Matches against the Middle Atlantic Section McKenzie qualified for the team eleven times and he earned a berth on the team a total of twelve times. He finished second in three Philadelphia Opens, one Section Championship and a Pennsylvania Open. McKenzie was the Section’s tournament chairman and first vice president in 1984 and 1985 and the Section president for the next two years. He was the Section’s 26th president. Three times he was a delegate to the national PGA meeting. In 1984 he was honored as the Section’s “Golf Professional of the Year”.

The 90th national meeting of the PGA of America was held at the Kiawah Island Golf Resort on The Sanctuary on Kiawah Island, South Carolina in the third week of November. It was an election year. Outgoing president of the PGA of America Roger Warren was the president of the Kiawah Island Golf Resort. There were four candidates for the office of secretary. Brian Whitcomb and Jim Remy moved up to the office of president and vice president without opposition. Allen Wronowski was elected secretary on the third ballot. There were 111 voting delegates, which included the district directors, national officers, past presidents and two delegates from each PGA Section. Jim Smith, Jr. and Mark Anderson were the delegates from the Philadelphia Section. Dick Smith, Sr. and Jack Connelly also attended the meeting as past presidents. It was announced that for the first time a national meeting would not be held in its calendar year. The 2007 meeting was going to be held in January 2008 in conjunction with the Orlando PGA Merchandise Show.

In December the Golf Association of Philadelphia announced several changes for its 102-year-old open championship, which was commonly referred to as the Philadelphia Open. The prize money was increased from what had recently been an average of $25,000 to $40,000. The size of the field was increased to 72 from the 60 that it had been since 1975. Due to the growth in the number of entries, qualifying was held for the first time in 1975. Separate qualifying events were held for the pros and the amateurs in order to have a starting field of 45 pros and 15 amateurs, which included several players who were exempt. Certain professionals and amateurs would still be exempt but there would now be three qualifying events that were open to both pros and amateurs. The entry fee for pros was $175 and $125 for the amateurs.   

Furyk, Jim 6 (TGH)
Jim Furyk

Tiger Woods was the “PGA Player of the Year” and the leading money winner on the PGA Tour with $9,941,563 in just 15 tournaments. Jim Furyk had his best year on the PGA Tour as he won two tournaments along with the Vardon Trophy. He had a scoring average of 68.86 strokes per round and he was second on the money list with earnings of $7,213,316 in 24 tournaments. Jason Bohn was 43rd as he won $1,676,893 in 29 events. Sean O’Hair slipped a bit but he still won $1,411,387 in thirty events, which was good for 62nd place.

Jay Haas led the PGA Senior Tour as he won $2,420,277. Ed Dougherty won $234,454 in 22 tournaments, which was good for 62nd place on the money list. Jay Sigel played in 20 tournaments and finished 65th on the money list with earnings of $213,949. Pete Oakley played in 5 tournaments and won $19,150.

Rick Price played in 28 tournaments on the PGA Nationwide Tour and won $65,107, which put him in 82nd place on the money list. Joe Daley finished 90th on the money list as he won $59,086 in 28 events. Tom Carter got into 24 events and won $14,549.

As the year came to an end “Golf Retirement Plus”, originally called “PGA Retirement Plus” was now ten years old. In 1997 the Acushnet Company became the founding partner and their name made this all possible. When PGA professionals who were in the program made certain purchases from participating companies money was contributed to their “retirement fund”. That growth of the money was deferred from federal taxes until the time that a PGA member decided to remove money from the fund. In some cases, this was the only retirement money for some golf professionals.   

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2007
The Masters Tournament was played in unseasonably cold weather during the first full week of April. The cold temperatures and some wind made the Augusta National Golf Club very difficult. For four days Zack Johnson held fast to a very conservative game plan by not trying to reach any of the par five holes in two shots. Johnson played the par five holes in eleven under par and the last day he played the last six holes in three under par to finish the tournament at 289. That equaled the highest winning score in Masters’ history and Johnson (71-73-76-69) won as he finished two strokes in front of Tiger Woods (291), Rory Sabbatini (291) and Retief Goosen (291) who tied for second. Jim Furyk tied for 13th at 296 and won $135,937. First prize was $1,305,000. Furyk was exempt off his position on the PGA Tour money list and his world ranking.

Moses, Mike (TGH)
Mike Moses

The Section’s spring meeting was held at the Blue Bell Country Club on the second Monday of April. Clark Luis opened the meeting with his usual resounding rendition of our national anthem. The newly elected secretary of the PGA of America, Allen Wronowski, was the guest speaker. The Director of Tournaments, John Pillar, announced that distance measuring devices could now be used in the Section’s tournaments. The financial report showed a net profit for 2006 of $72,143. The Section sent $25,000 to its reserve fund and as of December 31 there was $411,033 in the fund. The Section’s junior tour held 30 events and there were 10 tournaments that were held just for the girls. There were also eight tournaments for the six to nine year-old age group. A new addition was a junior team that would be competing against a junior team from the New Jersey PGA. The Section’s “Play Golf America” day to promote golf was scheduled for May 12 at the Woods Golf Center. The Section’s “PGA Golf Professional of the Year” was Concord Country Club professional Mike Moses. Moses learned to play golf as a junior at Penn Oaks Golf Club where he received instruction from the professional, Mike Cole. After a year of college he turned pro, working in the Philadelphia Section as an assistant and playing the mini-tours in Florida during the winter. He served as an assistant under Ed Bolha at the Eagle Lodge Country Club for five years. When Bolha retired Moses moved into the head position, where he stayed for another five years. In 1996 he became the head professional at Concord. He gave credit to Cole and Bolha for teaching him the golf business. He was the Section’s Director of Tournaments for three years after having been a member of the tournament committee and serving as a District Director. Moses was beginning his fifth year as the golf coach for Garnet Valley High School. For nearly two decades he had been one of the leading players in the Section, having won the 1992 Pennsylvania Open, along with numerous other events. Moses hosted the 1991 Section Championship at Eagle Lodge and he was hosting the Section Championship at Concord in 2007.

On the second Friday of May one of four events for U.S. Open local qualifying was held at the Philmont Country Club. There were 109 local qualifiers for the U.S. Open in the United States. This one had five open spots to qualify for. Georgia Tech student Adam Cohan of Wayne and a high-school senior from northern New Jersey, Paul Park, led with par 70 rounds. Devon’s Billy Stewart (71), who was playing mini-tours in Florida, finished third. The last two places were won in a three-man sudden death playoff by Water Gap Country Club assistant Dustin McCormick (72) and Virginia amateur Brinson Paolini (72).

U.S. Open local qualifying was held at the Wrendale Golf Club in Hummelstown on the third Tuesday of May. There were five spots to qualify for there also. Louisiana professional Brandon Aydlett led with a six under par 66. South African Justin Walters was next at 68. Chambersburg amateur Clayton Rotz was third with a 69. The last two places were won by Australian Tristan Lambert (70) and Connecticut’s Brett Stegmaier (70) in a three-man sudden death playoff.

Huntsville Golf Club hosted a local U.S. Open qualifier on the third Friday of May. The host professional, Mike Molino, led the scoring with an even par 72. There were just two spots to qualify for at that site and Kingston’s Gregory Pieczynski, who was playing the mini-tours, won the other spot with a 73.

The fourth one-round local qualifier for the U.S. Open in the Philadelphia Section was held at the DuPont Country Club on the fourth Tuesday of May. Philadelphia Country Club teaching professional Jason Hrynkiw took the first of five openings with a one over par 72. On the first hole Hrynkiw holed a bunker shot from 182 yards for an eagle two. West Chester amateur Chris Gallagher (73) was next. Paul Gagliardi, a mini-tour professional from Lower Gwynedd, and Zac Oakley took the third and fourth places with 74s. Amateur Amory Davis (75) from Chadds Ford won the fifth place in a two-man sudden death playoff. There were 74 players at DuPont. Oakley was Pete Oakley’s son and he was playing the mini-tours out of Lewes, Delaware.

The Senior PGA Championship was held at Kiawah Island, South Carolina during the fourth week of May. It was played on the Kiawah Island Golf Resort’s 7,201 yard Ocean Course. Dennis Watson won with rounds of 71, 71, 69 and 68. His nine under par 279 brought him in two strokes in front of Eduardo Romero (281). Nick Price was next at 282 and Joe Ozaki finished fourth at 284. First prize was $360,000 out of a total purse of $2,000,000. Jay Sigel tied for 61st with a total of 300 and won $3,925. George Forster, Sr., Ed Dougherty and Pete Oakley missed the cut and they each received $1,000. Sigel was in the field off being in the top 30 career money winners on the Senior PGA Tour. Forster had qualified by finishing in the top 35 at the Senior PGA Club Professional Championship. Dougherty and Oakley were there by special invitations from the PGA of America.

On the fifth Tuesday of May the lucrative Haverford Trust Classic was played at the Sunnybrook Golf Club. First prize was now $35,000, up $2,500 from the previous year. Jason Hrynkiw, who had never seen the Sunnybrook course before, but his caddy had, won with a solid five under par 67. For the second straight year David Quinn (68) took home the runner-up money of $5,500. Bill Sautter and Raven’s Claw Golf Club professional John Elliott tied for third with 70s and they each won $1,825.

Sean O’Hair and Joe Daley qualified for the U.S. Open in Columbus, Ohio on the first Monday of June. The qualifying rounds were held at the Scioto Country Club and Ohio State University’s Scarlet Course. O’Hair had been exempt from local qualifying and Daily had led a local qualifying tournament in Boise, Idaho with a 68. O’Hair was qualifying in Columbus because he had been there for the Memorial Tournament where he had tied for fifth the day before. Daily was touring the country playing the PGA Nationwide Tour. Due to the size and strength of the field there were 24 spots. Bubba Watson and Ryan Moore led the field with 136 totals. O’Hair (69-71—140) tied for 12th and Daily (70-71—141) tied for 17th. The players with 143 totals played off for the last spot. Jim Furyk was fully exempt.

The two-day Variety Club Tournament of Champions was played at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club on the second Tuesday and Wednesday of June. On the first day when the pros played in a pro-am to raise money for the Variety Club charities the day’s rounds were brought to an end by rain. Since some of the professionals were not able to complete their rounds the pro scores from day one were all wiped out. Only the professionals played on the second day and two rounds were scheduled.  Stu Ingraham led after the morning round with a five under par 67. He came back with a 72 in the afternoon. Steve Madsen, who had shot a 71 in the morning, turned in a 68 to catch Ingraham and they were tied at the top of the summary sheet with 139s. A sudden death playoff began on the first hole. They halved the first two holes with par fours and the par five third hole with birdies, which took them to the long par three fourth hole. Madsen hit the green with a punched driver shot. Ingraham missed the green on the left side and made a bogey. Madsen then two putted for a par and the win. First prize was $6,500. Mike Moses finished third at 140. J.R. Delish and Rich Steinmetz tied for fourth with 143s.  

The U.S. Open was held in the middle of June near Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, at the Oakmont Country Club. Angel Cabrera teed off on Sunday trailing by four strokes but he made that up and led by three with three holes to play. He made bogeys on the next two holes and managed a par at the last hole to finish at five over par 285. He then had to wait almost an hour for the third round leaders to finish. Jim Furyk and Tiger Woods had a chance to catch Cabrera. Furyk attempted to drive the par four 17th hole and wound up with a bogey. When Furyk and Woods failed to birdie the last hole Cabrera was the winner. Cabrera’s rounds were 69, 71, 76 and 69. He won $1,260,000 from the $7,000,000 purse. Furyk and Woods tied for second at 286. Niclas Fasth finished fourth at 287. Furyk won $611,336. Sean O’Hair and Joe Daley missed the cut.  

Qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open was held at the Glenmaura National Golf Club on the third Monday of June. There were two spots to qualify for there, which was the usual number for eastern Pennsylvania. Atlanta professional Tim Conley led the 73-player field with a five under par 66. Amateur Chris Lange won the other spot with a 67.

The 40th PGA Professional National Championship was played in Sunriver, Oregon during the fourth week of June. The par 72, 7,566-yard Crosswater Course and the par 71, 6,969-yard Meadows Course at the Sunriver Resort were used for the tournament. This event was the club professional’s avenue to qualify for the PGA Championship. The top 20 qualified. The tournament winner was Chip Sullivan with rounds of 72, 71, 68 and 70. Sullivan’s total of 281 won by four strokes. First prize was $75,000, Mike Small and Ryan Benzel tied for second with 285s. Butch Sheehan and Tim Thelen tied for fourth at 286. The players with 290 totals played off in a six-man sudden death playoff for the last five spots in the PGA Championship. David Quinn (291) and Stu Ingraham (291) missed the playoff by one stroke. They each won $4,728 as they tied for 22nd. Terry Hertzog (297) tied for 52nd and won $2,162. Jason Panter (298) tied for 62nd and won $1,975. Cape May National professional John Appleget, Jason Hrynkiw, Rob Shuey, Dave McNabb, Dick Smith, Jr. and Graham Dendler, who was now the professional at the Trenton Country Club, missed the cut. Rich Steinmetz had to withdraw just before the tournament because of some scheduling conflicts. Quinn, Ingraham, Hertzog, Shuey, Appleget, Smith and Dendler had qualified at the 2006 Section Championship. Panter, who was now a teaching pro at the Sea Oats Golf Club, got in as an alternate when Paul Oglesby couldn’t play and McNabb replaced Steinmetz. Hrynkiw had qualified for this event at the 2006 South Florida PGA Championship.

The PGA Tour Northeast PA Classic qualifying for the Section members was at the Glenmaura Golf Club on the fourth Tuesday of June. The Section had been allotted the usual three places. John Pillar won the first spot with a four under par 67. Commonwealth National Golf Club assistant Travis Deibert took the second spot with a 69 and Vince Ramagli shot a 70 to win the last spot.

The Burlington Classic was played at the Burlington Country Club on the first two days of July. On Sunday two pros were paired with three amateurs in a pro-am. The course was set up rather easy in order to get the large field around the course before dark. Rich Steinmetz led the first day with a six under par 64. For Monday’s round only the pros were playing and the course was set up 500 yards longer. Rob Shuey went around in 67 strokes, which added to his first day 68 gave him a total of 135 and a one-stroke victory. Steinmetz (136) slipped to a 72 and he finished in a tie for second with Stu Ingraham (136). Mark Sheftic (140) and Jason Hrynkiw (140) tied for fourth. First prize $2,500.

Qualifying for the British Open was held at nine locations, five of which were outside the British Isles. Qualifying in the United States was on the first Tuesday of July at the Oakland Hills Country Club, which was near Detroit, Michigan. There were twelve spots to qualify for at Oakland Hills. Michael Putnam led with 69-67—136. Sean O’Hair tied for eighth with rounds of 68 and 72 for an even par 140. Six players who were at 141 played off for the last three places.

The U.S. Senior Open was contested in Kohler, Wisconsin in the first week of July. The tournament was held on the Whistling Straights’ 7,068 yard Straights Course. With one round to go Tom Watson led the field by three strokes. Watson proceeded to open the door as he finished with a 78. The only one who managed to make a concerted move was Brad Bryant. He was the only one anywhere near the lead who was able to break 70 as he posted a four under par 68. His first three rounds were 71, 72 and 71. His 282 total won by three strokes. Ben Crenshaw finished second at 285. Loren Roberts was next at 286 and Watson finished fourth at 287. Pete Oakley tied for 45th with a 299 total and won $12,002. Oakley was in the tournament on a five year exemption for winning the 2003 British Senior Open. First prize was $470,000.

The British Open was played at the par 71 The Carnoustie Golf Club in Angus, Scotland during the third week of July. After three rounds, Sergio Garcia held a three stroke lead and Padraig Harrington trailed by six. In the final round Harrington caught fire and Garcia slipped a little. Harrington arrived at the last hole with a two stroke lead. The 18th hole at Carnoustie is one of the most difficult in golf and it proved to be so again. Harrington (69-73-68-67) put two successive shots in the burn and struggled to a double bogie so when Garcia reached the 18th tee he only needed a par to win. Garcia’s (65-71-68-73) second shot found a greenside bunker and when he couldn’t hole his par putt there was a two-way tie for the title at 277. When there was a tie for first place the British Open committee used a four-hole playoff to determine a winner. The playoff began on the first hole and finished with holes 16, 17 and 18. Harrington birdied the first hole and Garcia made a bogie. They both made pars on the next two holes. Harrington made a bogey on the 18th but when Garcia couldn’t do better than a par Harrington had won his first major. Andres Romero finished third at 278. Ernie Els (279) and Richard Green (279) tied for fourth. Jim Furyk tied for 12th with a 282 total and won $120,458. Sean O’Hair tied for 67th at 299, winning $20,257. First prize was equal to $1,542,450 in American dollars.

After playing well in the British Open, Jim Furyk headed for the Canadian Open. The tournament was held in Markham, Ontario Club during the last days of July. The Angus Glen Golf Club, which had two courses, used holes from both the North and South courses to host the event. Furyk was the defending champion and he showed that he was up to the challenge. He began the last round three strokes behind the leader, Vijay Singe. Furyk started with two birdies and then he holed a 5-iron for an “ace” on the fourth hole. Furyk (69-66-69-64–268) led from there to the clubhouse and finished with a seven under par 64. He needed every stroke as he edged out Singe (269) by just one stroke. Ryan Palmer and George McNeil tied for third at 271. First prize was $900,000. The Canadian Open was the third oldest national open championship.

On the fifth Monday of July the Philadelphia PGA Assistant Championship was played at the Philadelphia Cricket Club’s Militia Hill Course. The one-day 36-hole tournament ended in a four-way tie. Merion Golf Club assistant Josef Pohle (75-69), Tom Ryan (72-72), who was now the teaching pro at the Green Valley Country Club, Toftrees Resort Golf Club assistant Adam Corson (76-68) and Travis Deibert (72-72) all finished tied at 144. A sudden death playoff was held beginning on the par-four first hole, which Pohle won with a birdie. The tournament was also the qualifying event for the PGA Assistant Championship. The Section had been allotted four spots so the four players that had tied for first, all qualified. The prize money totaled $10,500 and Pohle took home a check for $1,500.

On the first two days of August Greg Farrow won the Philadelphia Section Senior Championship at his home course, the Deerwood Country Club. Farrow shot a 67 on Wednesday and a 66 on Thursday. He birdied three of the last five holes to finish with a total of seven under par 133 that won by three strokes. For the two days he made nine birdies and two bogeys. First prize from the $5,650 purse was $1,100. Jack Connelly and George Forster, Sr. tied for second at 136. Bill Sautter, who was now a teaching professional at the Philadelphia Cricket Club, finished fourth at 137. The tournament was also qualifying for the Senior PGA Professional National Championship for which the Section had been allotted eight spots. George Forster, Sr. was exempt off having finished in the top eight at the national championship the year before. The first three spots went to Farrow, Connelly and Sautter. Michael Mack took the fourth place with a 138. The Golf Course at Glen Mills professional Bob Pfister, Cleve Coldwater and Frank Palumbo picked up the next three places as they all posted 139s. Wayne Phillips finished at 140 and won a sudden-death playoff for the eighth and last spot.

Merion Golf Club hosted the 36-hole Philadelphia Open on the first Monday of August. There were 72 professionals and amateurs competing on the 6,654-yard East Course. In spite of a one-stroke penalty on the 32nd hole, amateur Mark Miller of Yardley Country Club won the tournament. It was the twelfth time that an amateur had won in the 103 times the tournament had been played. It was a good day for the amateurs as four ended up among the top eight scorers. Miller posted a steady one over par 71 in the morning round to trail the leader by two strokes. In his afternoon round Miller was three under par when he teed off on the 14th hole and he had a three stroke lead. While looking for his ball in light fescue rough he accidentally moved his ball and was assessed a penalty of one stroke. He managed to one putt the hole for a bogey and he made a bogey on the 16th hole. From there he finished with two pars for a 69 and a 140 total to win the tournament by one stroke. Mark Sheftic (141) finished second and took home the top money prize of $8,000. Christopher Gray was next at 143. Stu Ingraham, Dave McNabb and amateurs Chris Lange, Robert Robertson and Jeffrey Griest tied for fourth with 145 totals. The prize money totaled $40,000.

Open qualifying for the PGA Tour Northeast PA Classic was held at the Pocono Farms Country Club on the first Monday of August. There were fourteen spots to shoot for. Byron Smith, David Lutterus and Robert Hamilton led the scoring with five under par 67s. Bethlehem’s Alex Knoll tied for fifth with a 69. Eight players who had shot 70 tied for the last eight spots to make it right on the number and no playoff was needed.

The PGA Nationwide Tour Northeast Pennsylvania Classic was played at the Glenmaura National Golf Club in the second week of August. Justin Bolli birdied two of the last three holes to win the $90,000 first prize. With rounds of 68, 67 and 69 Bolli trailed by six strokes after the third round. His last round 66 gave him a fourteen under par total of 270, which was one stroke better than Richard Johnson (271) and Patrick Sheehan (271) who tied for second. Garth Mulroy, Jim McGovern, Jason Allred and D.A. Points tied for fourth at 274. Rick Price tied for tenth at 276 and won $11,500. Joe Daley finished with a 280 total and won $3,100 as he tied for $30th. Tom Carter tied for 37th at 281 and won $2,450. Travis Deibert, John Pillar, Alex Knoll, Vince Ramagli and Greg Pieczynski, a mini-tour professional from Kingston, missed the cut. Knoll had qualified in the open qualifier on Monday. The host professional was Cleve Coldwater. Price, Daley and Carter were on the Nationwide Tour. Deibert, Pillar and Ramagli had qualified at the Section qualifying event. Pieczynski had an exemption from the sponsor.  

The Pennsylvania Open was hosted by the Lancaster Country Club in the middle of August. For the second straight year the tournament was won by an amateur. Western Pennsylvania’s Mike Van Sickle shot a last round 65 to overtake the leader Richie Krebs and win by two strokes. Van Sickle’s (203) first two rounds were 67 and 71. Krebs (65-71-69), an assistant at the Hanover Country Club, played well in all three rounds and finished at five under par 205 as picked up the first place check of $10,000. Reading amateur Chip Lutz finished third at 206. Stu Ingraham and Greg Pieczynski tied for fourth with 207 totals. The total purse was $50,000.

During the second week of August the Southern Hills Country Club in Tulsa, Oklahoma hosted the PGA Championship for a fourth time. The main topic of conversation was the heat that hovered around 100 degrees all four days. It didn’t slow down Tiger Woods as he picked up his thirteenth major title with rounds of 71, 63, 69 and 69. His eight under par total of 272 was two strokes better than Woody Austin, who finished second at 274. Ernie Els was next at 275. John Senden and Arron Oberholser tied for fourth with 279s. First prize from the $7,000,000 purse was $1,260,000. Sean O’Hair (288) tied for 42nd and won $20,850. Jim Furyk missed the cut. O’Hair and Furyk were in the field off being in the top 70 on the PGA Tour money list since the 2006 PGA Championship. Furyk was also in the field as a member of the Ryder Cup Team and for having won a tournament on the PGA Tour in the past twelve months.  

George Forster, Sr. won the Whitford Classic in the last week of August at the Whitford Country Club. On Sunday sixty pros were paired with sixty amateurs for a pro-am and the professional’s score counted toward the two-day individual prizes. Forster put together a five under par 67 on Sunday and a 73 on Monday when the course was set up much more difficult. His 140 total edged out four of his fellow pros for the $4,000 first prize by one stroke. One of those was Stu Ingraham who had held the lead after shooting a 64 on Sunday. A ten at the par five ninth holes in Monday’s round cost Ingraham the victory. Ingraham, Terry Hatch, David Quinn and Dave Olexson, who was now an assistant at the Lehigh Country Club, tied for second with 141 totals.

On Monday September 1 the PGA of America celebrated “Patriot Golf Day” to support the families of servicemen that had died in military action. Jack Connelly and his club, Huntingdon Valley Country Club, stepped up and raised $24,800 for the Fallen Heroes Foundation, which led the country. Connelly was a military brat. His father served in the navy for 20 years and Connelly served in Vietnam for two years, 1966-67.  

The Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort hosted the Shawnee Open in the first week of September. Stu Ingraham and John Pillar led after Tuesday’s round with 68’s. On Wednesday they turned in 70s to finish at six under par 138. Earlier in the day Wild Quail Golf & Country Club assistant Chris Wisler had shot a 67 to go with his first round 71 and with everyone having completed their rounds there was a three-way tie at 138 for the first prize. A sudden-death playoff began on the par three 18th holes. All made pars and they moved on to the par four 1st holes where Ingraham holed an eight-foot birdie putt for the victory. Adam Corson (140) and Travis Deibert (140) tied for fourth. First prize was $1,500 from the $9,660 purse.

Steinmetz, Rich 2 (TGH)
Rich Steinmetz

After some near misses Rich Steinmetz won the Philadelphia Section PGA Championship. The Section’s most important tournament was hosted by the Concord Country Club and their professional Mike Moses, in the fourth week of September. Steinmetz never trailed as he opened with a one under par 70 to share the lead. In the second round he took a one stroke lead with another 70. In the final round on Thursday great putting helped Steinmetz shoot a third straight 70, which gave him a total of 210 and a three stroke victory. Only two players broke 70 during the tournament. First prize was $7,500 and the purse totaled $65,000. Two-time Section champion, Jim Masserio, eagled the par five last hole to finish second at 213. It was also the qualifier for the PGA Professional National Championship and based on the number of entries in this tournament the Section had been allotted nine spots. After Steinmetz and Masserio, the third and fourth spots went to Stu Ingraham and Steve Madsen who tied for third at 216. Terry Hatch, John DiMarco and John Pillar tied for next three spots with 217 totals. Cleve Coldwater and Moses finished at 218 and survived a four-man playoff for the last two spots.

The Philadelphia PGA professionals and the Golf Association of Philadelphia amateurs met in their annual challenge match at the Commonwealth National Golf Club on the second Thursday of October. Heavy rain delayed the start for more than an hour and then the temperatures dropped into the 50s. Two professionals and two amateurs were paired together as there were two singles matches along with a better-ball match in each group competing for a total of three points. There were at least two seniors on each team. The team of Vince Ramagli and Chester Valley Golf Club assistant Brian Gardner won three points. The Jason Panter-Damon Klepczynski team also won the maximum 3 points. Klepczynski was the president of the Golf Services Group. The senior team of George Forster, Sr.-Greg Farrow won 2-1/2 points. The Travis Deibert-Dave Olexson team won 2 points. The Rob Shuey-Adam Corson team won 1 point and the Dave McNabb-Mark Sheftic team won 1/2 point. The end result was 12 points for the PGA and 6 for the GAP. The tally for seventeen years of matches now stood at thirteen wins for the PGA against one GAP victory and three ties.

The Section’s Match Play Championship was held at the Cavaliers Country Club in the third week of October. The tournament began on Monday and two matches were played each day with the 18-hole final being played on Wednesday afternoon. There were 45 entries and nineteen players received byes, which filled out the 64 slot bracket. After five rounds of matches, Travis Deibert and Brian Kelly met in the finals with Deibert winning by the count of 3 & 1. In the semifinal round Deibert defeated John Appleget 2 & 1 and Brian Kelly got past Jason Panter one-up. First prize was $1,000 from a total of $5,000.

The Senior PGA Professional National Championship was held at the PGA Golf Club in Port St. Lucie, Florida during the third week of October. The tournament was held on both the Ryder Course (par 71, 6,729 yards) and the Wanamaker Course (6,736 yards). Bill Loeffler won with rounds of 72, 66, 66 and 72. His 276 score beat out David Lundstrom (277) by one stroke. Darrell Kestner, Bill Britton and Wayne DeFrancesco tied for third at 278. Bill Sautter (285) and George Forster, Sr. (285) tied for 17th and they each won $3,230. Sautter and Forster qualified for the 2008 Senior PGA Championship, as the top 35 made it and the low eight were exempt for next year’s Senior PGA  Professional National Championship. Greg Farrow, Wayne Phillips, Jack Connelly, Michael Mack, Cleve Coldwater, Frank Palumbo and Bob Pfister missed the cut and they each received $300. First prize was $20,000.

On the fourth Tuesday of October the Philadelphia PGA and the Variety Club broke ground at the Variety Club’s 3-hole golf course for children with physical disabilities. The cost of the golf course was expected to be $175,000. For 32 years the Philadelphia Section had been helping raise money for the Variety Club’s charities and it had recently donated considerable money toward this facility. The golf course was the brain-child of past Section president Tom Carpus. The ground breaking was led by Section president Dick Smith, Jr. and Vince Mariniello who had been the Variety Club’s leading promoter when it involved the Philadelphia PGA. The Section’s executive director, Geoff Surrette, and the Variety Club president also took part.   

The PGA Assistant Championship was held in Port St. Lucie, Florida during the last week of October. It was played on the PGA Golf Club’s 7.043-yard Wanamaker Course. Chris Moody (71-68-66-72) won by two strokes with an eleven under par 277. First prize was $9,000. Jim Herman finished second at 279. Scott Medlin (281) was third and Bob Jacobson (282) was fourth. Travis Deibert tied for 16th at 290 and won $1,175. Adam Corson finished in a tie for 26th at 292 and won $840. Joey Pohle won $405 as he finished at 306 and tied for 69th. Tom Ryan missed the cut.  

Smith, Jim Jr (TGH) (2)
Jim Smith, Jr.

The Section’s fall meeting was hosted by the Woodcrest Country Club on the fifth Monday of October. It was an election year. Jim Smith, Jr. moved up from vice president to president and Mark Anderson moved from secretary to vice president. Dan Haskell was elected secretary. Majestic Ridge Golf Club professional John Rogers and John Pillar were elected Director of Section Affairs and Director of Tournaments. They were all elected without opposition. The most important announcement of the day was that Tom Carpus was the national winner of the Horton Smith Award and Will Reilly national President’s Plaque honoree. They were to be officially introduced in January at the PGA’s national meeting in Florida. Instead of being held late in the year the national meeting was to be held later in conjunction with the PGA Merchandise Show in Orlando. The Section’s “Player of the Year” was Stu Ingraham and he also finished first in the DeBaufre Trophy competition with a scoring average of 70.94. George Forster, Sr. was the Robert ‘Skee’ Riegel Senior Player of the Year”. Section president, Smith, announced that the contract of the Section’s executive director, Geoff Surrette, had been extended for another five years.

Hendrickson, Dick 6 (TGH)
Dick Hendrickson

Dick Hendrickson, John Poole and Henry Picard were inducted into the Philadelphia Section Hall of Fame on the fifth Monday of October. Hendrickson grew up in Baltimore, Maryland. Baseball was his game when he was young. During his high school career he pitched nine no-hit games. At the age of 18 Hendrickson bought a driver, a five-iron and two-dozen used golf balls. He then went to a public park and began to try and learn the game of golf. He met a man at the park who played golf and the man showed Hendrickson a few fundamentals. After six months of practice the man took him to play one of Baltimore’s public courses, Mt. Pleasant Golf Course. Even though he had never hit a putt or a chip shot he proceeded to shoot an 86 in his first round of golf. After three-years of practicing he turned pro. He then worked as an assistant pro at Mt. Pleasant for two-years. In 1958 he came to the Philadelphia Section as an assistant to Skee Riegel at the Radnor Valley Country Club. He spent two-years at Radnor Valley and then two-years at the Country Club of Scranton before becoming the head pro at the Golf Farm Golf Club in 1962. The next year he moved next-door as the professional at the newly opened Laurel Creek Country Club and five-years later he moved to another new club, the Little Mill Country Club. While working at those clubs his golf game was rapidly improving so he began playing some tournaments on the PGA Tour during the winter months. In 1972, at the age of 37, he left Little Mill for a shot at the PGA Tour, which he played for two years. The only way a nonexempt player could get into a tournament was through Monday qualifying or by having made the cut in a tournament the previous week. During those two years he managed to get into 31 events and make 27 cuts, which was an accomplishment. In 1975 Hendrickson and Dick Smith, Sr. put together a partnership that leased the Wedgwood Country Club for four years. After 1978 they dissolved that agreement and Hendrickson became the professional at the Loch Nairn Golf Club where he stayed three years before moving to Radley Run as the professional where he stayed for six years. In late 1987 Hendrickson left Radley Run for a shot at the PGA Senior Tour. He played in the 1987 PGA Senior Tour’s qualifying school and when he didn’t earn an exemption for the next year it meant that he had to once again play in the Monday qualifying events in order to compete in that week’s tournament. This was even more difficult than the PGA Tour had been as there were usually only four spots to qualify for each week. In spite of that burden Hendrickson made it into twelve tournaments, finishing second twice. He finished 38th on the money list, which was remarkable since most of the leading players had played in thirty or more events. For the next five years, he finished well up on the money list, with 22nd being his best showing. He managed to stay on the PGA Senior Tour for twelve years where he finished second four times and third twice. During his career he played in four U.S. Opens, three PGA Championships, twelve Senior PGA Championships and six U.S. Senior Opens. Hendrickson won the Philadelphia Open three times, the Philadelphia PGA Championship once and five times he finished second in the Philadelphia PGA Championship. He was a member of ten Schmidt’s Challenge Cup Teams. Hendrickson played in eight PGA Club Professional Championships where he made the cut six times. Five times he was the “Player of the Year” in the Philadelphia Section and he won the DeBaufre Trophy for having the low scoring average four times. Hendrickson was the Section’s first vice president and tournament chairman from 1968 to 1970 and 1972 along with being the secretary in 1971. In 1971 he was the Section’s “PGA Golf Professional of the Year”.

Poole, John (TGH)
John Poole

John Poole learned to play golf as a caddy at the Old York Road Country Club when it was still located in Jenkintown. He attended Penn State University before beginning his golf career as an assistant in 1965 at the Foxcroft Country Club, which had been the Old York Road course two years before. Poole then worked in Pittsburgh as an assistant for three years before returning to Philadelphia as the head pro at Foxcroft. He later served two years as the head professional at the West Chester Golf & Country Club, 10-years at the Kennett Square Golf & Country Club and 19 years at the Chester Valley Golf Club. When the Section’s first Club Relations committee was formed in 1978 Poole was asked to be a member by the chairman Tim Foran. That is when Poole found his calling in the PGA. In late 1982 Poole was elected first vice president of the Section and he became the chairman of the Club Relations Committee. He was the chairman of the committee for more than fifteen years and a member of the committee for twenty-nine years. During that time Poole and his committee met with more than 150 golf facilities and had telephone conversations with more than 150 other clubs to advise them on the hiring of new head professionals. As a result of Poole’s efforts, numerous head professional positions in the Philadelphia Section were upgraded. He was a member of the national club relations committee for over ten years. Poole was a six-time winner of the Bill Strausbaugh Award at the Section level and in 1993 he was the PGA of America’s recipient of the Bill Strausbaugh Award. He won the Section’s Horton Smith award for educating the Section members on employment and club relations. As a player he had a third and a fourth place finish in the Philadelphia Open and he qualified for the PGA Club Professional Championship two times, making the cut in 1977. He hosted the PGA Senior Tour’s Bell Atlantic Senior Golf Classic at Chester Valley ten years. Poole was the Section’s 2nd vice president for three years and in 2000 he was the Section’s “PGA Golf Professional of the Year”.

Picard, Henry 4 (TGH) x
Henry Picard

Henry Picard learned to play as at caddy at the Plymouth Country Club in Plymouth, Massachusetts. His name was pronounced pea-card, but most people including his fellow professionals pronounced it PICK-erd. His friends called him “Pic”. Picard turned pro in 1924 and accompanied his boss to a winter job in Charleston, South Carolina where he was the winter pro. Within a few years he was named head professional at the Charleston Country Club. As a result of that he spent his early and last years as a golf professional in Charleston. In 1934 he picked up his first big win at the North and South Open. That summer he finished fifth at the Hershey Open while setting a course record in one of the rounds and that fall he signed on as the professional at the Hershey Country Club where he stayed for six years, 1935 through 1940. Due to his association with Hershey the sportswriters began referring to him as the “The Chocolate Soldier”. Picard left the Section for three years and returned as the professional at the Country Club of Harrisburg in 1944 and 45. After leaving Harrisburg he was the pro at the Seminole Golf Club in the winter and the Canterbury Golf Club in the summer. In the mid 1960s he returned to the Section as the professional at the new Blue Mountain Country Club near Harrisburg for two years. Picard put together an outstanding national tournament record during his six years in Hershey. He won the Met Open in 1935 and the Masters Tournament in 1938. In 1939 he won the PGA Championship defeating Reading’s Byron Nelson in the finals on the 37th hole. He was on the Ryder Cup team in 1935, 1937 and 1939 and the leading money winner on the PGA Tour in 1939. During his six years at Hershey he won 22 times on the PGA Tour and he finished in the top twenty-five 118 times. In 1945 he made a rare tournament appearance, winning for the last time at the Miami Open. Picard made one last run at a major title in the 1950 PGA Championship only to lose in the semifinals on the 38th hole to Henry Williams, Jr. During his career he won twenty-six PGA Tour events and was elected to the PGA Hall of Fame in 1961. He was always one of the leading golf instructors in the country. One of his pupils was Beth Daniel who he gave lessons to as a young girl in Charleston. She went on to be a star on the LPGA Tour. In 2006 Picard was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame and Daniel gave his induction speech.

Tiger Woods was the leading money winner on the PGA Tour with earnings of $10,867,052. That was almost twice what Phil Mickelson, who was second on the money list, won even though Woods played in six less tournaments. Woods was the “PGA Player of the Year” for the ninth time in eleven years. He also won the Vardon Trophy with a stroke average of 67.79 strokes per round, which tied his record for stroke average on the PGA Tour. Jim Furyk finished seventh on the money list. He played in 23 tournaments and won $4,154,046. Sean O’Hair won $1,921,226 in 28 events, which was good for 38th place on the money list. Due to severe back problems Jason Bohn played in just 17 tournaments winning only $527,512 and ended up in 142nd place.   

Jay Haas led the PGA Senior Tour money list for a second straight year as he won $2,581,001. Jay Sigel finished 56th as he played in 22 tournaments and won $263,363. Ed Dougherty played in 23 tournaments and finished 77th on the money list winning $147,572. Pete Oakley got into five tournaments and won $34,864. The Ace Club professional David Nevatt played in one event and won $928.

Rick Price played in 29 tournaments on the PGA Nationwide Tour and finished 55th on the money list winning $114,325. Joe Daley finished 64th on the money list as he played in 25 tournaments and won $92,193. Tom Carter won $75,102 in 30 tournaments and finished 79th on the money list. Emlyn Aubrey won $9,621 in nine tournaments.
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2008

Carpus, Tom 3 (TGH)
Tom Carpus
The 91st national PGA meeting was held at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Florida during the third week of January, just before the PGA Merchandise Show. It was the first time that the national meeting had been held that early in the year. A new logo was unveiled at the meeting in order to identify the PGA as experts in the game of golf and the golf business. Tom Carpus and Will Reilly received two of the PGA of America’s most important awards. Carpus received the Horton Smith Award for outstanding and continuing education of his fellow PGA professionals. Carpus had served on the PGA Rules Committee since 1995 and was the Philadelphia Section president in 2004 and 2005. In the past twelve years he had conducted 15 four-day rules workshops along with numerous one-day seminars on tournament administration. He frequently served as a rules official for PGA of America tournaments. In 1991 and 1992 Carpus was the Tournament Director for the Philadelphia Section where he managed more than 100 tournaments for the Section each year.

Reilly, Will 3x (TGH)
Will Reilly

Will Reilly received the President Plaque for extraordinary and exemplary contributions and achievements in the growth of the game of golf. This was the second national award for Reilly as he was named the 2005 PGA Junior Golf Leader. Reilly is the only PGA member to win two different national awards. His passion was growing the game of golf which he had been doing for many years with juniors, junior girls, school golf teams and Special Olympics. He was also on the First Tee board and worked with children with autism. When PGA president Brian Whitcomb called to inform Reilly that he had won the award he said that Reilly represented what the PGA was trying to do more than any other PGA member. Jim Smith, Jr. and Mark Anderson, who was now a teaching pro at the Philadelphia Cricket Club, were the delegates to the meeting. Other Section officers also attended the meeting along with the executive director Geoffrey Surrette. Also in attendance were past national presidents Dick Smith, Sr. and Jack Connelly.

For a second straight year Andy Barbin ran a three-day mid-winter golf show called the Victory Golf Show. This year it was held at the end of February at the Valley Forge Convention Plaza in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. The show drew more than 20,000 golfers who were looking forward to another season. Tickets were $5 on Friday and $10 on the weekend. The first 12,000 attendees received a gift bag valued at $200, which included free green fees at some of the local golf courses. The pro-golf sales people were there with the latest in golf equipment and clothing. There were driving nets where the golfer could get a free lesson from a PGA professional and there were contests for the junior golfers. There were clinics for the beginning golfer. The show had everything that might interest a golfer.

Sean O’Hair won the PGA Tour Pods Championship near Tampa, Florida in the second week of March. The tournament was played on the par 71 Copperhead Course at the Innisbrook Resort & Golf Club. The third round leader Stewart Cink held a four-stroke lead early in the final round but he fell back and O’Hair took over the lead. Even though he made a bogey on the last hole he won by two strokes. The scores were high as the pros faced four days of whipping winds. O’Hair shot rounds of 69, 71, 71 and 69 to finish at four under par 280. Cink, John Senden, Ryuji Imada, George McNeil, Billy Mayfair and Troy Masterson tied for second at 282. The win got O’Hair into the Masters Tournament and moved him into the top 40 in the world rankings, which made him eligible for the World Golf Championship which was being played two weeks later at Doral. First prize was $954,000.

Pillar (TGH)
John Pillar

The Section’s spring meeting was held at the Cedarbrook Country Club on the fifth Monday of March. The awards for 2007 were presented. The Section’s “PGA Golf Professional of the Year” was John Pillar, the professional at the Country Club of Woodloch Springs. He had been the professional at Woodloch Springs for fourteen years. For four of the last five years Pillar had been the Merchandiser of the Year in the Philadelphia Section for resort facilities. He had been the Director of Tournaments for the Section for the last two years and before that he had served on the tournament committee. Living in Hawley, he had one of the longest commutes in the Section but he was always in attendance at the Section’s meetings and tournaments. He put together and hosted the Woodloch Springs Open for several years. Pillar had been one of the leading players in the Section for several years and in 1997 he qualified for the U.S. Open. The “Teacher of the Year” was White Manor Country Club’s director of instruction Bob Kramer. This was the third time he had won the award. Vice President Mark Anderson reported that the Section had finished 2007 with a net profit of $60,495. $50,000 had been contributed to the Section’s reserve fund, which had a balance of $472,599 on December 31, 2007. Some of the Section’s income came from the PGA of America in a program called ADP, which had been instituted in the late 1980s. The Section had received $90,000 from that program in 2007. The Section’s junior golf program was also a contributor to the Section’s bottom line. There were 50 plus events scheduled for the Junior Tour along with events for an all girls tour and developmental tournaments for juniors who had not reached their tenth birthday. In total the Section was running almost 100 tournaments for junior golfers in all regions of the Section.

The Masters Tournament was played at the Augusta National Golf Club in the first full week of April. Trevor Immelman played steady golf in the first three rounds as he was around in less than 70 strokes each day. When he teed off in the last round he led by two strokes and with winds gusting up to 30 miles per hour no one stepped up to challenge him. Immelman took 75 strokes in the last round and his 280 total still won by three. There were only two rounds shot in the 60s on Sunday. His rounds were 68, 68, 69 and 75. Tiger Woods finished second at 283. Stewart Cink and Brant Snedeker tied for third with 284s. Sean O’Hair finished at 289 and tied for 14th, winning $135,000. His 14th place finish assured him of an invitation for the next year. Jim Furyk won $42,375 as he tied for 33rd at 293. First prize was $1,350,000.

On the third Thursday of April the Philadelphia Section PGA took “Play Golf America” to the Philadelphia Phillies’ Citizens Bank Park. Section professionals were set up at four driving nets located at various parts of the park in the concourses. More than 250 baseball fans received mini golf lessons. PGA of America President Brian Whitcomb threw out the first pitch before the Phillies took on the Houston Astros.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at the Woodcrest Country Club on the second Thursday of May. There were five places to qualify for at Woodcrest. John Pillar drove down from north of Scranton and led the field with a four-under-par 67. A 17-year-old amateur, David Sanders, was next at 68. David Quinn picked up the third spot with a 70 and the host professional Dick Smith, Jr. was next at 72. Robert Hornibrook, an assistant at the Burlington Country Club, shot a 73 and won the last spot in a two-man sudden death playoff.

Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort assistant Brian Bergstol led the local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Skillman, New Jersey on the second Thursday of May. The qualifying round was hosted by the Bedens Brook Club. There were six qualifying spots at Bedens Brook. Bergstol and Jim Famula tied for the top spot with even par 72s.

On the second Monday of May local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at the White Manor Country Club. There were six places to qualify for at White Manor. A temperature in the forties, 20 mile-per-hour winds and some rain made low scoring impossible. Chris Gray, who was now an assistant at the Ed Oliver Golf Club, and amateur Amory Davis were the low scorers with two-over-par 73s. Amateur Tom Gramigna was next with a 74. Chris Gallagher, a minitour professional from West Chester, and Texas professional Fred Brown, Jr. took the fourth and fifth spots with 75s. Joey Bonargo shot a 76 and won the last spot in a seven-man sudden death playoff.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at the Wren Dale Golf Club on the second Tuesday of May. There were three spots to qualify for at Wren Dale. Mark DiGiacomo, a mini-tour professional from Lebanon, and amateur Thomas Timby shot one under par 71s and won the first two spots. Greg Meyer shot a 72 and won the third place in a two-man sudden death playoff.  

On the second Wednesday in May the Bucknell Golf Club hosted local qualifying for the U.S. Open. There was only one spot available at Bucknell and the host professional Brian Kelly won it. Kelly tied for first with a one-over-par 71 and then wrapped up the lone spot by winning a two-man sudden death playoff.      

In the fourth week of May Jay Haas won the PGA Senior Championship for the second time in the last three years. The host club was the Oak Hill Country Club in Rochester, New York. The course was as difficult as usual and the winning score was the highest in the history of the tournament. His seven over par 287 came from rounds of 69, 72, 72 and 74. Bernhard Langer finished second one shot back at 288. Scott Simpson, Scott Hoch and Joey Sindelar tied for third with 289 totals. Pete Oakley, Bill Sautter, George Forster, Sr. and Ed Dougherty missed the cut. Oakley and Dougherty were in the field off special invitations from the PGA of America. Sautter and Forster had qualified by finishing in the top 35 in the 2007 Senior PGA Professional National Championship. First prize was $360,000.

The Burlington Classic was hosted by the Burlington Country Club on the first two days of June. On Sunday two pros were paired with three amateurs in a pro-am event and the professionals’ scores counted toward the two-day individual tournament. Rob Shuey won the tournament for the second straight year. On Sunday he posted a two-under-par 68 and on Monday he shot a 69. His 137 total won the $2,000 first prize by two strokes. Terry Hatch and Dave McNabb tied for second with 139 totals. Stu Ingraham finished fourth at 140.

Jason Bohn qualified for the U.S. Open on the first Monday of June in Roswell, Georgia. The qualifier was played on the Ansley Golf Club’s Settindown Creek Course. The par was 72 and the course measured 7,072 yards but the scores were very low. There were just three spots. Bohn (62-67) and Matt Kuchar (64-65) tied for the first two spots with 15-under-par 129s. The other spot was won by D.J. Trahan as he posted a 134 and won a two-man sudden death playoff. Bohn was exempt from local qualifying off being in the top 125 money winners on the PGA Tour at least once in the past five years.

Brian Bergstol qualified for the U.S. Open on the first Monday of June in Beallsville, New Jersey. The Members Club at Four Streams Golf Course hosted the qualifying. The par 71 course measured 7,102 yards. There were 28 players competing for two spots at Four Streams. David Hearn (71-66) won the first spot with a 137 and Bergstol (71-68) won the other spot with a 139 total.  

The PGA Nationwide Tour Northeast Pennsylvania Classic qualifying for Philadelphia Section professionals was held at the Glenmaura National Golf Club on the second Tuesday of June. There were three places in the tournament reserved for the Section professionals. John Pillar grabbed the first spot with a five under par 66. Brian Kelly won the second spot with a 68 and the third place was won by Academy of Golf Center driving range assistant professional Greg Pieczynski who shot a 69.

Eight weeks after arthroscopic knee surgery, which was performed two days after the Masters Tournament, Tiger Woods won the U.S. Open but it wasn’t as easy as some of his other major victories. The tournament was played on the South Course at the Torrey Pines Golf Course near San Diego, California in the middle of June. Rocco Mediate should have won but Woods kept holing impossible putts and chips. Thursday Woods made two double bogeys but he managed to finish at one over par 72. On Friday Woods shot a 38 on his first nine and came back with a 30 on the second nine. On Saturday Woods saved what would have been a disastrous round by holing two long putts for eagles and chipping in for a birdie in the last six holes. That gave him a one stroke lead with one round to go. On Sunday Woods holed a 12-foot side-hill birdie putt on the last hole to tie Mediate at 283. In the 18-hole playoff on Monday Woods blew a three stroke lead on the back nine and trailed by one, but he reached the 18th green with his second shot and two-putted for a birdie to get back even. Now it was a sudden death playoff to determine a winner. The playoff began on the 7th hole and Woods made a par four against a bogey for Mediate. Woods’ rounds were 72, 68, 70, 73 and 71 in the playoff. Mediate’s rounds were 69, 71, 72, 71 and 71 in the playoff. Lee Westwood finished third at 284. Robert Karlsson and D.J. Trahan tied for fourth at 286. First prize was $1,350,000. Jim Furyk tied for 36th at 293 and won $35,709.  Jason Bohn and Brian Bergstol missed the cut and each picked up $2,000. Sean O’Hair was entered but he withdrew due to a bruised chest from an auto accident. The entry fee was $150.  

The Variety Club Tournament of Champions was played at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club in the third week of June. On Tuesday each pro was paired with three amateurs in a pro-am to raise money for the Variety Club charities. On Wednesday the pros were paired together and both rounds counted toward the individual pro purse. George Forster, Sr. picked up the $6,000 top prize with a five under par 67 on Tuesday and a 72 on Wednesday. His 139 total was two shots better than Stu Ingraham (141), who was now the teaching professional at the M Golf Range & Learning Center. David Quinn and Dave McNabb tied for third with 142 totals.

The PGA Professional National Championship was held at the Reynolds Plantation in Greensboro, Georgia in the third week of June. It was played on the Great Waters Course and the Reynolds Landing Course. Scott Hebert won with rounds of 67, 71, 70 and 68 for a twelve under par 276. First prize was $75,000. Sonny Skinner finished second at 277 and Kyle Flinton was third at 280. Ryan Benzel and Tim Thelen tied for fourth with 281s. The top 20 qualified for the PGA Championship. Cleve Coldwater shot 287 and tied for 19th, but he lost out in a sudden death playoff for a place in the PGA Championship. Coldwater won $5,385. Terry Hatch and Steve Madsen tied for 24th at 288 and they each won $4,485. Madsen was now working in the South Florida PGA Section and had qualified in Philadelphia the previous year. John Pillar finished at 289 and tied for 33rd, winning $3,518. Rich Steinmetz, who was now the head professional at the Spring Ford Country Club, tied for 54th at 292 and won $2,190. Stu Ingraham, George Forster, Sr., Mike Moses and John DiMarco missed the cut. The Philadelphia Section pros had all qualified at the Section Championship in September. Forster got into the field in place of Jim Masserio, who had finished second in the qualifying during the Section Championship, but then decided not to play in this tournament. Masserio was now the teaching professional at the Applebrook Golf Club.

The two-day KNBT Lehigh Valley Open was held at the Riverview Country Club in the fourth week of June. Bethlehem Golf Club assistant Alex Knoll put together two solid rounds of golf but the scoring was torrid. On Tuesday Knoll shot a 67 and the next day he was one stroke better as he posted a 66 for an eleven under par 133. He only won by one stroke as Dick Smith, Jr. and Stu Ingraham tied for second with 134s. Travis Deibert finished fourth at 135. First prize was $2,850.   

Qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open was held at the Burlington Country Club on the first Tuesday of July. There were two spots to qualify for. Greg Farrow, who had worked at Burlington as an assistant, took the first spot with a three under par 67. Wayne Phillips won the other spot with a 70. There were no playoffs.

Price, Rick 2 (TGH)
Rick Price

Reading’s Rick Price won the largest prize in the history of the PGA Nationwide Tour at the Players Cup. The tournament, which offered the first $1,000,000 purse on that tour, was played at the Pete Dye Golf Club in Bridgeport, West Virginia during the second week of July. In the last round Price held the lead most of the round but Chris Anderson was never far off the pace. On the last hole Price made a bogey against a par for Anderson and they were tied for the $180,000 top prize at 15-under-par 273. They returned to the 18th tee for a sudden death playoff and Price made a bogey again but he won. The win moved him up to third place on the money list for the year and assured him of finishing the season in the top 25, which qualified the Nationwide Tour players for a full exemption on the PGA Tour the next year. Price’s rounds were 64, 71, 66 and 72. Peter Tomasulo, David Hern and David Bradshaw tied for third with 275 totals.     

Greg Farrow added to his successes in the New Jersey Open as he finished second. The tournament was held at the Alpine Country Club in the middle of July. Farrow made it close with a last round 69 but he came up one stroke short. Mark McCormick won with rounds of 70, 73 and 71 for a two-under-par 214. Farrow finished alone in second place at 215. Frank Esposito and amateur Patrick Fillian tied for third with 217s. First prize was $15,000.

The British Open was played at the Royal Birkdale Golf Club in Southport, England during the third week of July. The defending champion, Padraig Harrington, arrived at the site of the Open nursing a sore wrist, which didn’t allow for much practice. The story in the early rounds was the play of 53-year-old Greg Norman. He opened with a pair of even par 70s and a 72 in the third round made him the leader entering the last round. Harrington started with a 74 but a second round 68 put him back in the tournament. He shot a 72 in the third round and trailed Norman by two strokes. It may have been Norman’s recent lack of tournament play or maybe it was his age, but he took 77 strokes in the last round. A last round 69 put Harrington in the clubhouse four strokes in front of the field at 283. Ian Poulter shot a 69 in the last round to finish second at 287. Norman and Henrik Stenson tied for third with 289 totals. First prize was $1,498,875 in United States money. Jim Furyk tied for fifth at 290 and won $359,730. Sean O’Hair finished 82nd at 306 and won $16,987. Furyk and O’Hair were in the tournament off being in the top 50 in the world rankings.

Greg Pieczynski won a rain-shortened Philadelphia Open on the fourth Wednesday of July. The tournament was played at the 6,901 yard Lookaway Golf Club. There were 40 amateurs and 32 professionals in the starting field. Lightening and rain caused a 90 minute delay. When the delay happened there were just two that had not completed their morning rounds and one of those was Pieczynski who was about to play his second shot to the par-four 18th hole. It was 3:58 pm when play resumed. With more inclement weather predicted the Golf Association of Philadelphia decided to cancel the scheduled second round and make it a one-round event. Pieczynski played his second shot to the green and got down in two putts for five-under-par 67. He won by two strokes as Dave McNabb and amateur Michael McDermott tied for second at 69. David Quinn and amateur David Esbenshade tied for fourth at 70. First prize was $8,000 from a purse of $40,000.  

After winning the Philadelphia Open Greg Pieczynski came right back five days later and won the Philadelphia PGA Assistant Championship, which was played at the DuPont Country Club on the next Monday. One round was played on the par 70 DuPont Course and one round on the par 71 Nemours Course. The entry fee was $200 for the tournament and another $150 for the national championship. Pieczynski put together rounds of 66 and 67 for an eight under par 133 to win by five strokes. Whitemarsh Valley Country Club assistant Mike Sullivan finished second at 138 and Cedarbrook Country Club assistant Randy Blouin was third at 139. Overbrook Golf Club assistant Scott Hunter, Joey Pohle, Pine Valley Golf Club assistant Hugh Matthis, Meadowlands Country Club assistant Anthony Bonargo, Alex Knoll and Travis Deibert finished in a sixth-way tie for fourth with 140 totals. This was also the qualifying event for the PGA Assistant Championship. Four players qualified for the national championship. The first two went to Pieczynski and Sullivan. Blouin had not entered the national championship so the third and fourth places were contested in a six-man playoff, which were won by Bonargo and Deibert. First prize was $1,500 and the total purse came to $9,890.

The U.S. Senior Open was played on The Broadmoor Golf Club’s East Course in Colorado Springs, Colorado during the first week of August. Eduardo Romero won going away in spite of making four straight bogeys on the last nine of the East Course. Romero’s rounds were 67, 69, 65 and 73, which gave him a six-under-par 274. First prize was $470,000. Fred Funk finished second at 278. Mark McNulty finished third at 279 and Greg Norman was fourth at 280. Greg Farrow and Wayne Phillips missed the cut and they each received $1,000. The entry fee was $150.

The Pennsylvania Open was played at the Old York Road Country Club in the second week of August. For just the fourth time in the 92-year history of the tournament there was a repeat winner. Amateur Michael Van Sickle (209) put together rounds of 71, 69 and 69 to finish one stroke in front of the field. Two more amateurs, Nathan Smith and Robert Galbreath, Jr., tied for second with three-under-par 210 totals. Dan Walters (211), who was playing the professional mini-tours out of Lancaster, tied for fourth with amateur Travis Howe (211) and took home the top check of $10,000. The purse totaled $50,000. Greg Pieczynski was the low professional from the Philadelphia Section, tying for sixth at 212. Van Sickle was the first amateur to repeat as the winner. Ed Dudley (1929-30), Johnny Weitzel (1955-56) and Steve Kovach (1946-47) were the other three repeat winners.  

In the second week of August Padraig Harrington won his third major championship, the PGA Championship. The venue was the Oakland Hills Country Club near Detroit, Michigan. On the weekend Harrington swept past a strong field with a pair of 66s to finish at three-under-par 277 and win by two strokes. In the end the difference was that Harrington played the last three holes in one-under-par while Garcia and Curtis were playing those holes in one-over-par. Harrington’s first two rounds were 71 and 74. First prize was $1,350,000. Sergio Garcia and Ben Curtis tied for second with 279 totals. Camilo Villegas and Henrik Stenson tied for fourth at 281. Jim Furyk finished at 290 and tied for 29th, winning $47,550. Sean O’Hair tied for 31st at 291 and won $38,825. Furyk and O’Hair were in the field off being in the top 70 money winners on the PGA Tour since the last PGA Championship.

George Forster, Sr. won the Philadelphia Section Senior Championship at the Bellewood Golf Club. Forster put together rounds of 70 on Wednesday and 69 on Thursday for a three-under-par 139. First prize was $1,000 from a purse of $5,000. He edged out Jim Masserio (140) by one stroke. The tournament was also qualifying for the PGA Senior Professional Championship and based on the number of entries in the qualifying tournament the Section had been allotted seven spots. After Forster and Masserio the third spot went to J.R. Delish (141). Cleve Coldwater (144) won the fourth spot. The last three places went to Golf Galaxy @ Devon teaching professional Leigh Taylor, Greg Farrow and Cedarbrook Country Club professional Kerry Mattern as they all posted 145s. Masserio and Farrow didn’t go to the tournament. The first alternate Frank Palumbo (146) and the second alternate Don DeAngelis (147) replaced them.

The PGA Tour NE Pennsylvania Classic was held at the Elmhurst Country Club in the fourth week of August. The 6,781 yard course usually played to a par of 72 but par was reduced to 70 for the tournament. With nine holes to play Scott Piercy trailed the leaders, but after shooting a six-under-par 29 on the back nine he was the victor by two strokes. Piercy put together rounds of 66, 68, 69 and 64 to finish with at thirteen under par 267. First prize was $94,500. Cameron Percy and Brendon De Jonge tied for second with 269 totals. Jeff Gallagher, Brad Fritsch and Rich Barcelo tied for fourth with 270s. Rick Price finished tied for 7th at 271 and won $16,931. Joe Daley tied for 17th at 274 and won $6,641. Jonathon Rusk, Brian Kelly, John Pillar, Greg Pieczynski and Tom Carter missed the cut. The total purse was $525,000. Price, Daley and Carter were in the tournament as fully exempt players on the PGA Nationwide Tour. Rusk had conditional status on the Nationwide Tour, Kelly, Pillar and Pieczynski had qualified in the Section qualifying event.

The Whitford Classic was played on the fourth Sunday and Monday of August at the Whitford Country Club. Brian Kelly led the first day with a 66, but a 73 on Monday was just enough of a slip to let Terry Hatch (70-69) catch him. They were tied with five-under-par 139s and a sudden death playoff began on the first tee. The playoff went four holes and Hatch won with a birdie four. First prize was $5,000. Greg Farrow, George Forster, Sr., Terry Hertzog and Jim Masserio tied for third at 140. The total purse was $24,000.

(L) G. Connell (R) G. Forster, Sr. (TGH)
Tournament Sponsor & Forster

For the first time the Haverford Trust Company Classic was played sometime other than the day after Memorial Day. Earlier in the year the host Sunnybrook Golf Club had been undergoing extensive renovations so the tournament was held on the first day of September, the day after Labor Day. George Forster, Sr. played early and shot a 71, which held up for six hours but then Chris Wisler made a birdie on the last hole for a 71. Soon after that Travis Deibert finished with a bogey and a par on the last two holes for another 71. The three players returned to the 18th tee for a sudden death playoff. All three were on the green in regulation two shots. Wisler and Deibert missed their putts for birdies. Forster then holed his 12-foot side-hill putt for a birdie and the victory. The tournament sponsor, George Connell, had again increased the first prize by $2,500. Forster took home a check for $37,500. Graham Dendler and David Quinn tied for fourth with even par 72s. The total purse was $60,150.

 In recent years the Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort and the Shawnee Open had been plagued by rain and this year was no exception. The tournament was played in the second week of September. Monday’s round was rain free but torrential rain greeted the players on Tuesday morning. The plan had been to send the players off both nines at 8:30 am. Finally the players were able to have a shotgun start at 1:00 pm. John Pillar put together a 70 and a 67 and his seven-under-par 137 was two strokes better than the rest of the field. David Quinn and Brian Bergstol tied for second at 139. Five players tied for fourth. Shawnee teaching professional Jim Miller, Bill Sautter, Greg Pieczynski, John Appleget and Rich Steinmetz all ended up at 140. First prize was $1,500 and the purse totaled $8,720.

The Ryder Cup was played in the third week of September at the PGA’s Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville, Kentucky. There were twelve players from the PGA of America and twelve from the European PGA. Jim Furyk was a member of the U.S. team for the sixth straight time. On Friday and Saturday there were four foursomes matches in the morning and four better-ball matches in the afternoon. On Sunday all twelve players from each team played singles matches. Each match was one point so there were 28 points to play for. The U.S. team won five-one/half points the first day and three one/half the second day. That meant the U.S. led by two points with Sunday’s singles left to play. The U.S. won with ease as they took seven-one/half of the twelve points to finish with 16-1/2 points against 11-1/2 for Europe. Furyk played in four of the five rounds, winning 2-1/2 points. He won a foursomes match, halved a foursomes match, lost a four-ball match and won his singles match. When Furyk closed out his singles that point clinched the victory for the Americans. The win stopped a stretch of three straight victories for Europe.   

Ingraham, Stu 4 (TGH)
Stu Ingraham

The Philadelphia Section Championship was hosted by the Llanerch Country Club in the fourth week of September. 48-year-old Stu Ingraham won the Section’s major championship that had been eluding him for several years by posting rounds of 74, 70 and 69. His even par 213 score left him tied for the victory with Greg Farrow (213), who was in his final round pairing. The last day was cool with a blustery wind but the 57-year-old Farrow matched Ingraham shot for shot as he posted a 68. They arrived at the 54th hole all tied. Ingraham holed a 25-foor putt for a birdie and Farrow then sank his twelve-foot birdie putt to keep it tied. The two professionals returned to the 18th tee for a sudden death playoff. Ingraham hit a four-iron off the tee and was in the fairway while Farrow used his driver and wound up in a fairway bunker. Ingraham was on the green in two and Farrow’s second shot ended up in a bunker that fronted the green. Ingraham made a par against a bogey for Farrow to wrap up the win and a check for $7,500. The purse totaled $65,000. The tournament was also qualifying for the 2009 PGA Professional National Championship. Based on the number of entries in the qualifier the Section had been allotted ten places. The first two places went to Ingraham and Farrow. Mike Molina finished third at 216. Brian Kelly, Cleve Coldwater and Mark Sheftic, who was now the teaching professional at the Merion Golf Club, tied for fourth with 217 totals. Coldwater was exempt for having finished tied for 19th at the 2008 tournament held in June so the fourth and fifth places went to Kelly and Sheftic. Jim Masserio (218) and Rich Steinmetz (218) tied for the seventh and won the sixth and seventh spots. George Forster, Sr. (220) and Greg Meyer (220) won the eighth and ninth places. The tenth spot went to Dick Smith, Jr. (221).  The host professional was Ben Lesniak. Later the Section was awarded one more spot. Masserio and Farrow didn’t go to the PGA Professional National Championship so then alternates Scott Hunter (222), Woodcrest Country Club teaching professional Don Allan (224) and Hugh P. Reilly (224) got into the tournament.

The Senior PGA Professional National Championship was held in the first week of October. The tournament was played near Palm Springs, California at the Toscana Country Club and the Andalusia Country Club. Kirk Hanefeld (70-70-70-68) put together a ten-under-par 278 to win by four strokes. John Fielder and John Aubrey tied for second at 282. Thomas Herzan, Mike San Filippo, Chris Tucker and Jim White tied for fourth with 283s. First prize was $20,000. George Forster, Sr. tied for 15th at 287 and won $4,750. Cleve Coldwater (288) tied for 23rd and won $2,605. Forster and Coldwater qualified for the 2009 Senior PGA Championship as the top 35 earned berths. Kerry Mattern (303) also made the cut as he tied for 69th and won $1,000. Don DeAngelis, J.R. Delish, Leigh Taylor and Frank Palumbo missed the cut.   

The annual challenge match between the Philadelphia PGA professionals and the Golf Association of Philadelphia amateurs was held at the Stone Harbor Golf Club on the second Wednesday of October. Two professionals and two amateurs were paired together as there were two singles matches along with a better-ball match in each group competing for a total of three points. There were at least two seniors on each team. The Don Allan-Dick Smith, Jr. team won 3 points. The teams of Greg Farrow-Michael Mack, Hugh P. Reilly-Greg Pieczynski and Stu Ingraham-Jamie Komancheck each won 2 points. The team of Cape May National Golf Club assistant Zachary Mullock and John Appleget won 2 points also. The Mark Sheftic-Brian Kelly team won 1/2 point. That added up to 11-1/2 points for the PGA and 6-1/2 for GAP. In the 18-year history of the matches the Section professionals had now won fourteen times, lost once and played to a tie three times.     

The Little Mill Country Club hosted the Section’s Match Play Championship in the third week of October. There were 49 entries so 15 byes were inserted into the field to create a 64-player ladder. Two matches were played on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. The players faced three cool and windy days, with each day getting a little colder. When the four semifinalists teed off on Wednesday morning it was 45 degrees. Four of the Section’s best players were in the semifinals. It was Brian Kelly versus Mark Sheftic and Stu Ingraham versus David Quinn. Kelly won his match but it took two extra holes to get the victory. Ingraham got past Quinn by just one-up. In the afternoon Kelly defeated Ingraham 2 & 1 to win what Kelly called his eighth major championship in the Section. Kelly had now won three Philadelphia PGA Championships, two Philadelphia Opens and one Pennsylvania Open to go with two wins in this tournament. The purse came to $6,800.

The Philadelphia Section’s fall meeting was held at the LuLu Country Club on the fourth Monday of October. Clark Luis opened the meeting with his usual powerful rendition of our national anthem. The biggest news was that the Section had won the Herb Graffis Award, which honored the PGA Section that did the most to promote player development in its region. Philadelphia received the award for its many programs like the Buddy Program and Junior Golf Tour. The Section’s various members had been deeply involved with the Mid-Atlantic Blind Golfers, Philadelphia Police Athletic League, Executive Women’s Golf Association, First Tee program, LPGA Youth, Victory Golf Show and Play Golf America. The Section’s Junior Tour had held 89 regular events, which was a 41 percent increase over the previous year. 598 different juniors had participated, which was an increase of 21 percent. Its developmental tour had ten events, which were held at the Woods Golf Center’s 18-hole par three course. The Section’s “Player of the Year” was Stu Ingraham and the “Robert ‘Skee’ Riegel Senior Player of the Year” was George Forster, Sr. Brian Kelly won the DeBaufre Trophy with a scoring average of 70.94 strokes per round.  George Fazio and Ron Rolfe were inducted into the Philadelphia Section Hall of Fame.      

Fazio, George (TGH)
George Fazio

George Fazio was born in Norristown, Pennsylvania in 1912. He had a varied and outstanding career in golf. Fazio worked as a golf professional, leased courses and driving ranges, won golf tournaments and designed golf courses. His career in golf began as a caddy at the Plymouth Country Club. Fazio worked as a professional at six different golf courses in the Philadelphia area including the Pine Valley Golf Club in New Jersey and he played the PGA Tour on and off during the late 1940s and most of the 1950s. Locally Fazio won the Philadelphia Section Championship in 1941 and from 1949 to 1959 he won five Philadelphia Opens along with finishing second twice. In 1950 while working in the Middle Atlantic Section Fazio won their Section championship. He won twice on the PGA Tour, which included winning the Canadian Open in 1946, and finished second seven times. In 1950 he tied with Ben Hogan and Lloyd Mangrum for the U.S. Open title at Merion Golf Club and lost in an 18-hole playoff. He also finished fifth in the 1952 U.S. Open and tied for fourth in 1953. During his career he played in 14 U.S. Opens, 14 PGA Championships and 7 Masters Tournaments. In the mid 1950s television was in its infancy and a young Jack Whitaker was doing ten minutes of sports at 11:00 pm on WCAU TV. Whitaker could see that golf was becoming very popular so he invited Fazio to be a guest on his show each Wednesday evening. The Wednesday show with Fazio was a hit as hundreds of viewers sent in postcards and letters with golf questions. In 1955 the city of Philadelphia hired Fazio to make changes, which would tighten up its Cobbs Creek Golf Club for the PGA Tour’s Daily News Open that the course was hosting that year. That got him started in course design and in 1960 he shifted his career over to building golf courses. Fazio gained more fame as a golf course architect than he had from playing tournaments. He designed 64 courses and redesigned 20 more. Nine of the courses he created were in the Philadelphia Section. Several of his courses quickly made Golf Digest’s list of “America’s 100 Greatest Golf Courses. A number of golf courses that Fazio designed and golf courses that he redesigned hosted national championships and PGA Tour events. The list included the 1972 Masters, six U.S. Open courses and the 1968 U.S. Women’s Open. Fazio was inducted into the Philadelphia Section PGA Hall of Fame in 2008.

Rolfe, Ron (TGH)
Ron Rolfe

Ron Rolfe was born in 1942 in New London, Connecticut. He was introduced to golf at the age of 12 as a caddy at the New London Country Club. After high school he attended Mitchell College on a basketball scholarship. Rolfe turned pro in 1964 and began his professional career as the assistant at the New London Country Club. He arrived in the Philadelphia Section in 1965 as the assistant to Bob Ross at the North Hills Country Club. The next year Ross left North Hills for the head professional position at the Philadelphia Cricket Club. Even though Rolfe was just 23-years old and not a PGA member yet the North Hills C.C. officers hired him to follow Ross as their professional. It was a match made in heaven as Rolfe went on to serve North Hills in that position for 42-years. Since the tireless Marty Lyons no one gave more of their time and effort to assist the Philadelphia PGA than Rolfe. He was a member of the tournament committee for more than thirty years and in 1981 he was the co-chairman along with Tom Smith. That year he was the non-playing captain of the Schmidt Challenge Cup Team. Rolfe served the Section for 12-years on the Board as a District Director. He was a member of the PGA committee that provided the first junior golf clinics that were open to the public. He coached a high school girls’ golf team and created a league of teams in which they could compete. He then helped them procure golf courses for their practice and matches. Rolfe and North Hills hosted more events for the Section than any other club and those were the ones that were the least lucrative for the host. They hosted the Section championship three times, qualifying for the PGA Club Professional Championship five times, Section Senior Championship twice, U.S. Open qualifying twice and the Schmidt Festival twice. Along with that he hosted one-day Section tournaments and seminars. Rolfe was also always able to find a way to make his course available to the assistants and senior organizations. In the community he was always there to help people in need and many times he provided financial assistance to veteran caddies who were destitute. For twenty-five years he was one of the Section’s steady players who usually finished in the money at the weekly events and as a senior he continued to cash checks. In his younger years as a PGA member he played on the Caribbean Tour and competed on the PGA Tour during the winter events on the west coast. As a senior he was twice a member of the Section’s Challenge Cup team that defeated the GAP team. When Dick Smith, Sr. and Jack Connelly ran for national office Rolfe was one of the first that volunteered to attend the national meetings and assist with their campaigns. He was quietly one of the Section’s most respected golf instructors. On a number of occasions pros sent Rolfe young players who were trying to take their games to another level. In 2008 Rolfe was elected to the Philadelphia Section PGA Hall of Fame.

The PGA Assistant Championship was played at the PGA Golf Club’s Wanamaker Course in late October. The tournament ended on the second Sunday of November. In the last round Kyle Voska (71-74-69-65) came from sixth place and five strokes back to win the $9,000 first prize. Voska’s nine-under-par 279, won by one stroke over Matt Dobyns (280). Sean Dougherty finished third at 281. Caine Fitzgerald, Dean Larson and future Section member Jake Gerney tied for fourth with 284s. Greg Pieczynski finished at 285 and tied for seventh, winning $2,183. Travis Deibert, Anthony Bonargo and Mike Sullivan missed the cut. The course measured 7,102 yards.    

The PGA of America’s Annual Meeting was held during the second week of November at the Marriott Desert Ridge Resort & Spa in Phoenix, Arizona. It was an election year. Jim Remy was elected 36th president of the PGA. Allen Wronowski moved up from secretary to vice president. Ted Bishop was elected secretary. A resolution presented by the Northern Texas PGA requiring a PGA apprentice to be employed at a green grass facility until Level 1 is completed passed. Ten of the past presidents gave speeches that focused on how the economy is affecting the golf business. Pat Reilly stated “Yesterday is history, today is a blessing and tomorrow is a mystery”. The Philadelphia Section was represented by its President Jim Smith, Jr. and Vice President Mark Anderson along with other officers. Dick Smith, Sr. and Jack Connelly, past presidents of the PGA of America, were also in attendance.  

Vijay Singe led the PGA Tour in money winnings with $7,951,094 as he played in 24 tournaments. Tiger Woods only played in six tournaments due to a knee operation that took place right after winning the U.S. Open in June. He still finished second on the money list with $5,775,000. Padraig Harrington was the “PGA Player of the Year”. Sergio Garcia won the Vardon Trophy with a scoring average of 69.12. Woods didn’t have enough rounds to be eligible. Jim Furyk played in 28 tournaments and won $3,740,714, which was good for eleventh place on the money list. Sean O’Hair played in 25 tournaments and finished 36th on the money list, winning $2,089,857. Jason Bohn missed part of the year with back problems but he still won $866,786 in fifteen tournaments and finished 123rd on the money list. Bohn was already playing on a medical exemption from the previous year.

Bernhard Langer led the PGA Senior Tour as he won $2,035,073. Ed Dougherty played in 20 tournaments and won $68,802, which was good for 101st place on the money list. Jay Sigel had shoulder problems and only played in five tournaments. He won $51,896 and ended up in 111th place on the money list. Pete Oakley also got into five tournaments and won $28,483. David Nevatt played in one event and won $736.

Rick Price won $284,922 on the PGA Nationwide Tour in 26 tournaments. He finished 12th on the money list, which earned a place on the 2009 PGA Tour as the top 25 earned full playing privileges. Price had been to the PGA Tour qualifying 19 times without success, but now he was on the PGA Tour. Joe Daley played in 27 events and finished 59th on the money list winning $113,597. Tom Carter played in 27 tournaments and won $26,028. Jonathon Rusk won $9,948 in 13 tournaments.

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2009

Reilly, Will (TGH)
Will Reilly
The Section’s spring meeting was held at the Old York Road Country Club on the fifth Monday of March. Clark Luis opened the meeting with his usual booming rendition of the national anthem. Skee Riegel, one of the Section’s most famous and influential members had died on February 22. Several Section members spoke on how much he would be missed. As well as being a great player he was one of the most knowledgeable people on the rules of golf. The Section’s Executive Director, Geoff Surrette, reported that the Section had made its yearly $50,000 to the Reserve Fund and that the fund now had a value of $380,015. The members and apprentices brought items such as golf caps, batteries, playing cards, etc. to the meeting for the servicemen in Iraq and Afghanistan. Enough was donated to fill two large vans. It was announced that the Section had formed a rules committee, which was headed up by national rules committee members Tom Carpus and Luis. National Vice President Allen Wronowski attended the meeting and spoke on national affairs. He stated that due to the weak economy the PGA of America had cut $2.6 million out of the 2009 budget. There was a report from the Instruction Committee, which had come into being in 2002. Their goal was to make each PGA member a better instructor and to make the public aware of the benefits of instruction by a PGA member. A change in the by-laws to have two independent, non members of the Philadelphia, on the board of directors was passed. They were to be elected by the executive committee. The “Teacher of the Year” was Aronimink Golf Club teaching professional John Dunigan. The “PGA Golf Professional of the Year” was Will Reilly. This was just one of several awards that Reilly had won. In 2003 and 2004 he won the Section’s Junior Golf Leader award and in 2005 he won PGA of America’s Junior Golf Leader winner. In 2007 he was the PGA’s President’s Plaque winner and he won that honor on the Section level in 2005 and 2006. He was presently serving on several of the Section’s committees.

The Masters Tournament was held in the first full week of April. Angel Cabrera won his second major championship but it took a playoff to complete the job. Kenny Perry made bogies on the last two holes of regulation, which resulted in a three-way playoff for the title with Cabrera and Chad Campbell. The three players had finished with twelve-under-par 276s. The sudden death playoff began on #10 and Campbell went out with a bogey five. The two survivors went to #18 for a third extra hole. Cabrera drove into the trees on the right, hit a pine tree with his second shot and ended up in the fairway. From there he got down in two to send the playoff back to #10. Perry’s tee shot was in the fairway but there was mud on the ball. His second shot sailed left of the green and he made a bogey against a par for Cabrera. Cabrera’s rounds were 68, 68, 69 and 71. Shingo Katayama finished fourth at 278. Jim Furyk and Sean O’Hair put together 281 totals and tied for tenth. They each won $187,500. Furyk qualified for the tournament off being in the top 30 on the PGA Tour money list for 2008. O’Hair was there for having finished in the first 16 at the 2008 Masters Tournament. Also everyone in the top 50 in the world ranking on January 1 was invited. First prize was $1,350,000.The golf course measured 7,435 yards.      

Sean O’Hair won the Quail Hollow Championship in Charlotte, North Carolina on the first Sunday of May. The Quail Hollow Club’s course was usually as difficult as any course for a major championship and this year was no different. O’Hair played four solid rounds as he posted 69, 72, 67 and 69. On Sunday he made bogies on the last two holes but his 69 was the only round under 70 posted by the last 18 players on the course. His eleven-under-par 277 total won by one stroke. First prize was $1,170,000. Bubba Watson and Lucas Glover tied for second at 278. Tiger Woods finished fourth at 279. It was his third career victory on the PGA Tour. The total purse was $6.5 million.  

On the first second Tuesday of May local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at the Laurel Creek Country Club. There were 103 pros and amateurs competing at Laurel Creek for seven spots. North Carolina professional Derek Brown was low with a three under par 68. Vince Covello, who had grown up playing at the Llanerch Country Club and was now playing the mini-tours, was second at 70. There was a seven-man sudden death playoff for the last five spots. The playoff lasted just one hole as Galloway National Golf Club assistant Eric Dovre, John Allen, Joey Bonargo, amateur Peter Barron III and Christian Bartolacci, who was back at Jericho National Golf Club as an assistant after four years on the professional golf mini-tours, all made pars to move on to sectional qualifying. They had all posted 72s in regulation play.

Cavalier Country Club head professional Dave McNabb led the local qualifying for the U.S. Open at his home course on the third Monday of May. His one-over-par 72 led by two strokes. There were three spots to qualify for. Amateur Buddy Reed and Virginia professional Jonathan Schoenfeld each shot a 74 and then won a seven-man sudden death playoff for the other two places. Reed made a birdie on the first extra hole and Schoenfeld birdied the second extra hole to earn his spot.

On the third Wednesday of May local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held in central Pennsylvania at the Dauphin Highlands Golf Club. Brandon Knaub, who was back playing the mini-tours, was low by four strokes with a six-under-par 66. The Country Club at Woodloch Springs assistant Kris Rudy was next with a 70. Amateurs Chad Bricker and Shawn Hall posted 71s and survived a sudden death playoff to take the last two spots.

Greg Pieczynski led the local qualifying for the U.S. Open at the Huntsville Golf Club on the third Thursday of May. His three under par 69 led by two strokes over Stu Ingraham who posted a 71. Chadds Ford’s Luke Vargo, who was playing the professional mini-tours, won the third and last spot by posting a 73 and then surviving a two-man sudden death playoff.   

The Haverford Trust Company Classic was back to being played on its usual day, the Tuesday after Memorial Day, and as always it was hosted by the Sunnybrook Golf Club. The 140 golfers were greeted by unseasonably cold weather and the scores reflected the conditions. When all of the scores had been posted Travis Deibert and Brian Kelly were alone at the top of the leader board with one under par 71s. A sudden death playoff began on the 18th tee. Deibert reached the green with his second shot and Kelly’s didn’t. Kelly made a bogey and Deibert two-putted for a par and took possession of a check for $40,000. Laurel Creek Country Club assistant Brian Hollins finished alone in third place with a 72 and no one was even able to post a 73. David Quinn, Scott Hunter, Mark Sheftic and Gregg Meyer all came in with 74s and tied for fourth. The total purse was $58,690. Due to the size of the purse a large number of Section members and apprentices entered the tournament. For several years now a prequalifying event had been held to trim the starting field to a workable number.

A special invitee of the PGA of America won the Senior PGA Championship in the fourth week of May. Michael Allen, who was an exempt player on the PGA Tour, had no status on the PGA Senior Tour. In 20 years of playing the PGA Tour he had never won a tournament and his career earnings of $4.9 million was also too little to earn any status. He started with a 74 and then set a tournament record for making up the most strokes to win. In the next three rounds he shot 66-67-67 to finish with a six-under-par 274 and win by two strokes. The venue was the Canterbury Country Club near Cleveland, Ohio. Larry Mise finished second at 278. Bruce Fleisher (277) was third and Tom Watson (280) finished fourth. Cleve Coldwater, George Forster, Sr. and Pete Oakley missed the cut. Coldwater and Forster had qualified at the Senior PGA National Championship in October. Oakley was a special invitee as the 2004 British Senior Open winner.

The Burlington Classic was played at the Burlington Country Club on the last Sunday of May and the first Monday of June. The tournament ended in a tie between Dick Smith, Jr. (68-69) and Terry Hatch (71-66) at three-under-par 137. A sudden death playoff began on the 18th hole, and they both made par fours. They returned to the 18th tee and this time Smith made a par against a bogey for Hatch, who was now the professional at the Mahoning Valley Country Club, to wrap up the title and a check for $2,500. Travis Deibert finished third at 138 and the host professional Michael Mack was fourth at 139. The total purse was $15,090.

No one from the Philadelphia PGA Section was able to make it through sectional qualifying for the U.S. Open. Jim Furyk was exempt off having won the U.S. Open in the past ten years and Sean O’Hair was exempt off being ranked among the top 50 in the world.

For the second time in two weeks Dick Smith, Jr. won an important Section tournament as he finished first in the Variety Club Tournament of Champions. The tournament was held at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club on the third Tuesday and Wednesday of June. On Tuesday the professionals took part in a pro-am to raise money for the Variety Club charities. The pros’ scores counted toward a two-day total and on Wednesday just the pros were paired together. Smith and Stu Ingraham posted identical rounds of 68 and 71 for five-under-par 139s. On the first hole of a sudden death playoff Smith made a birdie against a par for Ingraham to win the $6,000 first prize. Jim Masserio, Terry Hertzog, George Forster, Sr. and Mountain Laurel Golf Club professional Eddie Perrino tied for fourth with 142 totals. The total purse came to $29,100.

The U.S. Open was played at the Bethpage State Park’s Black Course in the third week of June. Before the tournament even started the golf course was saturated from rain. Three hours into round one more rain arrived and no more golf was played that day. There were other interruptions and the tournament’s fourth round wasn’t played until Monday. Several players had a good chance to win but when it was over Lucas Glover was holding a check for $1,350,000 and the winner’s trophy. While others faltered Glover (69-64-70-73) played the last three holes in one-under-par. His four-under-par 276 was two shots better than anyone else. Phil Mickelson, Ricky Barnes and David Duval tied for second with 278 totals. Sean O’Hair tied for 23rd at 285 and won $76,422. Jim Furyk tied for 33rd at 287 and won $47,404.

Sheftic, Mark (TGH)
Mark Sheftic

The PGA Professional National Championship was held in Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico at the end of June and the first day of July. There were 312 club professionals in the field and play was over the Twin Warriors Golf Club and the Santa Ana Golf Club. This was the club professional’s avenue to qualifying for the PGA Championship. Mark Sheftic challenged for the title as he led after the second and third rounds. Sheftic (67-68-70-73) needed a birdie on the 72nd hole to win the tournament. His eight-iron shot to the green landed behind the hole and the ball rolled to the back fringe. He chipped back a little short and just missed the tying putt. Mike Small (70-71-68-68) won by one stroke with a seven-under-par 277. Sheftic tied for second with Stephen Schneiter at 278. Craig Thomas, Lee Rinker, Ryan Benzel and Eric Lippert tied for fourth with 279 totals. In spite of losing an opportunity to win a national title Sheftic qualified for the PGA Championship and the PGA Cup Team. There were twelve members of the Philadelphia PGA in the field but the other eleven all missed the cut. They were; Scott Hunter, Rich Steinmetz, Don Allan, George Forster, Sr., Hugh P. Reilly, Cleve Coldwater, Stu Ingraham, Brian Kelly, Dick Smith, Jr., Gregg Meyer and Mike Molino. First prize was $75,000 and the purse totaled $550,000.

Bill Sautter qualified for the U.S. Senior Open in Paramus, New Jersey at the Arcola Country Club on the fifth Monday of June. Donnie Hammond and Bobby Heins were low with five-under-par 67s. Sautter and Steve Thomas tied for third with 68s and won the last two of the four spots without the need of any playoffs.  

Qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open in the Philadelphia area was held on the first Monday of July at the Overbrook Golf Club. Amateur Chris Lange, who was an Overbrook member, and Florida professional Mo Guttman were the two qualifiers as they both posted one-over-par 71s. The only playoffs needed were for alternate spots.

The 2009 British Open will always be remembered as the one that 59-year-old Tom Watson almost won. The Open was held on Turnberry’s Ailsa Course at Ayshire, Scotland in the third week of July. Watson led from the second day to the 72nd hole where he needed a par to win. Watson hit a good drive and what appeared to be a good second shot, but his golf ball rolled through the green and down a little slope. From there he putted eight-feet past the hole and then missed his par putt. Watson (65-70-71-72) and Stewart Cink (66-72-71-69) were tied with two-under-par 278s. There was a four-hole playoff but it was anticlimactic as Cink did it in two-under-par and won by six strokes. First prize was $1,221,005 in American dollars. Chris Wood and Lee Westwood tied for third at 278. Jim Furyk tied for 34th at 285 and won $38,358. Sean O’Hair tied for 65th at 292 and won $16,199. Furyk and O’Hair were in the tournament off being in the top 50 of the world ranking.

Rich Steinmetz won the Philadelphia Open on the third Wednesday of July and he broke the tournament record in the process. The tournament was hosted by the 6,681-yard Bent Creek Country Club. It was a day for low scores. The defending champion, Greg Pieczynski, shot an eight-under-par 63 in the morning round but only led by one stroke. Pieczynski birdied the first two holes in the afternoon round but two balls out-of-bounds on the back nine ended his chances of defending the title. Steinmetz shot a 68 in the morning and in spite of a 45-minute rain delay during the afternoon round he put together a 64. His 132 total was a tournament record for both total score and most under par. Mark Sheftic and Aronimink Golf Club assistant Adam Condello tied for second at 136. The host professional Terry Hertzog, Pieczynski and amateur Conrad Von Borsig tied for fourth with 138 totals. First prize was $8,000.

On the fifth Wednesday of July Philadelphia Section qualifying for the PGA Nationwide Tour Northeast Pennsylvania Classic was held at the Elmhurst Country Club. The Section was allotted its usual three spots. Greg Pieczynski was low with a four-under-par 66. Travis Deibert was next with a 67. The third spot went to Scot Hunter who finished with a 70.

The U.S. Senior Open was played at the Crooked Stick Golf Club in Carmel, Indiana and concluded on the first Sunday of August. Fred Funk ran away from the field as he turned in rounds of 68, 67, 68 and 65. His 20-under-par 268 total was six strokes better than the rest of the field. Joey Sindelar finished second at 274. Russ Cochran was third at 276. Greg Norman and Loren Roberts tied for fourth with 277 totals. Bill Sautter missed the cut. First prize was $470,000. Sautter had qualified in northern New Jersey.

The Lehigh Valley Open was held at the Riverview Country Club in the first week of August. Rich Steinmetz continued his torrid play as he put together a 65 on Monday and a 67 on Tuesday to finish at twelve-under-par 132. In the two days Steinmetz made 16 birdies and an eagle. Stu Ingraham finished four shots back in second place with a 136 total. Greg Pieczynski and David Quinn tied for third at 137. First prize from the $8,550 purse was $1,500.

The Pennsylvania Open was played at the Oakmont Country Club in the second week of August. Justin Smith, a mini-tour professional from western Pennsylvania had a poor opening round of 77 and then rebounded with a pair of 68s. His even par 213 was two better than Stu Ingraham (215) who finished second. The defending champion, amateur Mike Van Sickle, and Robert McClellan tied for fourth at 217. The purse was $50,000 and the winner took home a check for $10,000.

The PGA Championship was held at the Hazeltine National Golf Club in Chaska, Minnesota in the middle of August. The surprise was that Tiger Woods, who was the leader with one round to play, didn’t win. Yong-Eun “Y.E. Yang trailed Woods by nine strokes after five holes of the second round and finished three strokes in front of him after four rounds. Yang (73-70-67-70), who was paired with Woods, only needed a bogey on the last hole to win but from 210 yards he put a 3-hybrid twelve feet from the hole. He holed the putt for an eight-under par 280. Woods was second at 283. Lee Westwood and Rory McIlroy tied for third with 285 totals. First prize was $1,350,000 and the purse was $7,500,000. Jim Furyk tied for 63rd at 298 and won $14,550. Sean O’Hair finished 75th at 302 and won $13,500. Mark Sheftic, who was in the tournament for having finished second in the PGA Professional Championship, missed the cut and received a check for $2,500. Furyk and O’Hair were there by being in the top 70 money winners on the PGA Tour since the 2008 PGA Championship.

Wayne Phillips won the Philadelphia Section Senior Championship at the Philadelphia Country Club in the third week of August. The temperature was in the 90s but the senior professionals seemed to handle it without problems. On the second day Phillips and Bill Sautter were paired together and when the round ended they had posted identical rounds of 72 and 69 for the two days. Their one-under-par 141s were one better than the rest of the field. A sudden death playoff began on the first hole.  They halved the first two holes with pars. On the third extra hole Sautter’s tee shot went out-of-bounds and Phillips proceeded to win the hole and the title with a birdie. George Forster, Sr. finished third with a 142 total. Cleve Coldwater and Greg Farrow tied for fourth with 143s. First prize from the $5,560 purse was $1,000. The tournament was also the qualifying event for Senior Professional National Championship. Based on the number of entries the Section had been allotted eight places in the national championship. Phillips, Sautter, Forster, Coldwater and Farrow won the first five spots. The sixth spot went to J.R. Delish (145) and the seventh went to Don DeAngelis (147). Jim Masserio (148) won the last spot with a par on the first hole of a sudden death playoff with Centre Hills Country Club professional Jeb Boyle (148). Boyle got into the tournament when the Section was given another spot.

The Whitford Classic was held at the Whitford Country Club in the fourth week of August. On Sunday Stu Ingraham blistered the front nine at Whitford as he needed just 30 strokes to finish the nine and he then shot a 33 on the back nine. His nine-under-par 63 led the field by five strokes. The first day the pros were also playing a pro-am with two pros and two amateurs in each pairing. The next day Ingraham shot a steady 71 and his 134 total won by four strokes. First prize was $3,000. Jim Masserio and George Forster, Sr. tied for second at 138. John DiMarco and Bill Sautter tied for fourth with 139 totals. The total purse was $20,000.  

Open qualifying for the PGA Nationwide Tour Northeast Pennsylvania Classic was held at the Pocono Farms Country Club on the fourth Monday of August. There were fourteen places in the tournament to qualify for. Daniel McCarthy was low with a seven-under-par 65. Six players who had posted 70s played off for the last five spots.

The PGA Nationwide Northeast Pennsylvania Classic was held at the Elmhurst Country Club at the end of August. The 6,690-yard par 71 Elmhurst course gave up a lot of birdies in four days. When regulation play ended on Sunday Gary Christian (68-70-63-64) and Mathias Gronberg (68-68-65-64) were tied for the top prize at nineteen-under-par 265. A sudden death playoff was held on the par four 18th hole to determine a winner and the two pros played it over and over. After they had both made pars on the hole eight straight times, finally there was a winner the ninth time when Christian made a birdie against a bogey for Gronberg. First prize from the $525,000 purse was $94,500. Henrik Bjornstad finished third at 267 and Chris Tidland was fourth at 269. Joe Daley finished 24th at 273 and won $3,885. Scott Hunter shot a 65 in the last round to finish tied for 60th at 279 and won $1,496. Rick Price, Tom Carter, Greg Pieczynski and Travis Deibert missed the cut. Daley and Carter had exempt status on the Nationwide Tour. Price was exempt for the PGA Tour and thus also was exempt for the Nationwide Tour. Hunter, Pieczynski and Deibert had qualified through the Philadelphia Section event. The host professional was Rick Barone.

For the second straight year Greg Pieczynski won the Philadelphia Section Assistant Championship and this time it was by a whopping seven strokes. The tournament was hosted by the Hartefeld National Golf Club on the fifth Monday of August. Pieczynski trailed Whitemarsh Valley Country Club assistant Billy Mullen by four strokes after shooting a 71 in the morning round. In the afternoon Pieczynski put together an eight-under-par 64 to finish with a total of 135. Mullen, Travis Deibert and Scott Hunter all tied for second with 142s. This was also qualifying for the PGA Assistant Championship and based on the number of entries in this tournament the Section had been allotted four spots in the national championship. So, Pieczynski, Mullen, Deibert and Hunter were the Section’s four qualifiers. First prize from the $8,745 purse was $1,275.

The two-day Shawnee Open was played at the Shawnee Inn & Country Club in the second week of September. Travis Deibert put together a 67 on Tuesday and a 68 on Wednesday. It took a birdie on the par-three 230-yard eighteenth hole to sew up the win. His nine-under-par 135 edged out Stu Ingraham (136) by one stroke. Woodstone Golf Club assistant Nathan Fry, David Quinn and Greg Pieczynski tied for fourth with 138s. The total purse was $8,125 and first prize was $1,500.

Mark Sheftic was in Scotland in the third week of September playing on the ten-man PGA Cup Team. The United States team was competing against the Great Britain & Ireland at The Carrick in Loch Lomond. Sheftic won his foursomes match on Friday and lost in a four-ball match Friday afternoon. On Saturday morning he lost in the foursomes match and sat out Saturday’s afternoon four-ball match. On Sunday he won his 18-hole singles match 6&5. The U.S. team won as they captured 17-1/2 points against 8-1/2 for GB&I.   

Pillar, John 6 (TGH)
John Pillar

John Pillar won the Philadelphia Section Championship at the Concord Country Club in the fourth week of September. Pillar and Mark Sheftic, who had just returned from Scotland where he had been competing in the PGA Cup Matches, were paired together in the last round. Pillar (71-69-67) and Sheftic (73-67-67) both shot 67 in the last round, as Sheftic birdied the last two holes to get his. They were tied for the Section’s most important title with six-under-par 207s. They were sent back to the 18th tee for a sudden death playoff. Sheftic missed a ten-foot birdie putt and Pillar holed a birdie putt from six feet for the win. First prize was $7,000. Cleve Coldwater finished third at 210 and Dave McNabb was fourth at 211. The purse totaled $62,000. The tournament was also qualifying for the PGA Professional National Championship. Based on the number of entries in the Section Championship, Philadelphia had 10 places to qualify for. Sheftic was exempt based on his second place finish the year before, so the first three spots went to Pillar, Coldwater and McNabb. The seven other qualifiers were Stu Ingraham (212), Rich Steinmetz (213), Mike Moses (214), Greg Farrow (215), John Allen (215), John Appleget (216) and Mike Molino (216). Appleget and Molino survived a three-man sudden death playoff to win the last two spots. Brian Kelly (216) lost out in the playoff but made it into the tournament as the first alternate. Moses was the host professional.

The PGA Assistant Championship was played on the PGA Golf Club’s Wanamaker Course in Port St. Lucie, Florida during the first week of October. Tim Thelen ran away from the field with rounds of 66, 65, 66 and 68. His 23-under-par 265 score won by seven shots and broke the tournament record by five strokes. First prize was $9,000. Sean Dougherty finished second at 272. Martin Maritz (276) was third and John Connelly (277) finished fourth. Travis Deibert finished tied for fifth at 278 and won $2,900. Greg Pieczynski, Billy Mullen and Alex Knoll missed the cut.

On the second Thursday of October the Philadelphia PGA and the Golf Association of Philadelphia met in their annual challenge match at the Woodcrest Country Club. There were twelve on each team and it was required that two be seniors. In each pairing there were two professionals and two GAP amateurs playing two singles matches along with a better-ball match. The teams of Rich Steinmetz-Dick Smith, Jr., Dave McNabb-Brian Kelly and Scott Hunter-Adam Condello each won 3 points. The teams of Greg Pieczynski-Stu Ingraham, Mark Sheftic-Travis Deibert and the senior team of George Forster, Sr.-Bill Sautter each won 2-1/2 points. The final tally was 16-1/2 points for the Philadelphia PGA and 1-1/2 points for the GAP. The matches were now in their 19th year. The Section professionals had now won fifteen times, lost once and played to a tie three times.

The Match Play Championship was held at the Little Mill Country Club in the third week of October. There were 50 entries so 14 received byes to fill out the 64 spots on the match play ladder. Two 18-hole matches were scheduled for each of three days. Travis Deibert and George Forster, Sr. met in the final and Forster eked out a one-up victory. In the semifinals Deibert got past Jason Panter, who was now the teaching professional at the Bucks Club, by the count of 3&2 and Forster defeated Michael Mack 6&5. The purse totaled $4,200 and first prize was $750.

Anderson, Mark (TGH)
Mark Anderson

The Section’s fall meeting was held at the Commonwealth National Golf Club on the fourth Monday of October. Two proposed resolutions were presented for a vote. One was the PGA District II Director selection process. Up to then there had not been a written process for this. The Section’s District Director served a three-year term on the PGA of America board and every ninth year one had to chosen to serve. The second resolution redefined the Director of Section Affairs’ responsibilities. Both resolutions passed without much discussion. It was reported that the Section’s reserve fund, which had suffered some investment setbacks, had a balance of $490,584 as of the end of September. It was an election year. Mark Anderson, who had been the vice president, was elected president and Dan Haskell moved from secretary to vice president. John Pillar was elected secretary and Mike Moses was elected Director of Tournaments. Ian Dalzell ran against John Rogers for Director of Section Affairs, with Dalzell, who was the professional at the Hidden Creek Golf Club, being elected by 25+ votes. District II Director, Rob Loesch was in attendance and spoke on national affairs. The Section was thanked for the “Treats for Troops” generous donations at the spring meeting. The golf caps from various golf facilities and golf companies were most popular. The Section’s “Player of the Year” was Stu Ingraham and he won the DeBaufre Trophy with a scoring average of 69.28 strokes per round. For the fourth straight year the “Robert Skee Riegel Senior Player of the Year” was George Forster, Sr.  Art Wall, Jr. was inducted into the Philadelphia Section Hall of Fame. His son, Greg Wall, who was the professional at the Pocono Manor Golf Club, accepted and spoke for his father who was deceased. Greg mentioned that whenever his father was having a problem with his swing he would go to see Jerry Port at the Glen Oak Country Club and Jerry would fix his problems.

Wall, Art 5 (TGH)
Art Wall, Jr.

Art Wall, Jr. was born in Honesdale, Pennsylvania in 1923 and learned to play golf at the Honesdale Golf Club. Wall got his start in golf by caddying for his father at Honesdale. After high school he entered the service and served during World War II. When the war ended Wall enrolled at Duke University where he played on the golf team and roomed with Mike Souchak, graduating in 1949, at the age of 26. Wall won the Pennsylvania Amateur twice in the late 40s. After college he turned pro and worked as an assistant on Long Island for two summers, while testing his game on the PGA winter tour. In late 1951 he joined the PGA Tour full time and picked up his first win at the Ft. Wayne Open in 1953. The next year Wall won the Tournament of Champions and he went on to win twelve more PGA Tour events. Along with his victories on the PGA Tour, Wall won ten times on the Caribbean Tour. His last win came at the 1975 Milwaukee Open at the age of 51, which made him the second oldest to win on the PGA Tour. His best year was 1959 when he won the Masters Tournament along with three other tournaments. That year he was the PGA “Player of the Year”, won the Vardon Trophy for the lowest scoring average, led the PGA Tour in money winnings and earned a spot on the Ryder Cup team. The next year Wall won the Canadian Open. He played on three Ryder Cup teams and served on the PGA Tour’s four-man Policy Board three years. He tied for second at the 1974 Senior PGA Championship in his first year of eligibility and went on to several more high finishes in the tournament. In 1978 he won the U.S. National Senior Open by four-strokes with a 72-hole score of 18-under par. That National Senior Open was two years before there was a PGA Senior Tour or a USGA Senior Open. Some credit for the creation of the PGA Senior Tour should go to Wall. In April 1979 he was teamed up with Tommy Bolt at the Legends of Golf Tournament in Texas. At the end of regulation play they were tied with Julius Boros and Roberto De Vicenzo. In the sudden death playoff four holes were halved with birdies before the Boros-De Vicenzo team won with a birdie on the sixth extra hole. NBC-TV stayed with the telecast, which knocked out their Sports World and Nightly News shows. The TV ratings were so good that the PGA Tour decided that a PGA Senior Tour could be of interest to the golfing public. During his career Wall made so many hole-in-ones that it reached the point where he refused to divulge the total. For most of his career he represented the Pocono Manor Resort where his son Greg was later the professional for many years. He played in 31 Masters Tournaments, 15 U.S. Opens and 12 PGA Championships. Wall won the Philadelphia Section PGA Championship five times.

The Senior PGA Professional National Championship was held at the PGA Golf Club’s Wanamaker Course at the end of October. Bill Britton (69-69-65-67) won and set a tournament record as he finished at 18-under-par 270. Perry Arthur finished second, just one stroke back, at 271. Paul Daniels (273) finished third and Mike San Filippo (274) was fourth. Cleve Coldwater tied for 27th at 283 and won $2,279. George Forster, Sr. shot a 284 and finished in a five-way tie for 33rd. The top 35 qualified for the PGA Senior Championship so Coldwater was in and Forster was in a sudden death playoff to determine the last qualifiers and the alternates. Forster finished fourth in the playoff and became the first alternate. Forster won $2,000. When the tournament was held Forster was in the field. Jim Masserio, Bill Sautter, Jeb Boyle, J.R. Delish, Don DeAngelis, Greg Farrow and Wayne Phillips missed the cut.

The PGA of America’s national meeting was held at the Ritz-Carleton Hotel in New Orleans, Louisiana during the third week of November. Three African-American golf professionals from the past were recognized and honored. Teddy Rhodes, Bill Spiller and John Shippen were made posthumous members of the PGA. Heavyweight boxing champion Joe Lewis was made an honorary PGA member posthumously. An avid golfer, Lewis spent many of his dollars sponsoring black golfers. The theme of the meeting was “Building a Blueprint for Success in Challenging Times”. Four employers in the golf industry spoke on the opportunities for PGA professionals. Past Presidents Dick Smith, Sr. and Jack Connelly along with the other past presidents shared their thoughts with the delegates. The Section’s delegates were Mark Anderson and Dan Haskell.      

Lewis, Bud 3 (TGH)
Joseph “Bud” Lewis

PGA Magazine reported that Joseph “Bud” Lewis was now not only the oldest living PGA member but also he had been a PGA member longer than anyone else. Lewis had now been a PGA member for 78 years and five months, surpassing Gene Sarazen who was a PGA member for 78 years and two months. Lewis had celebrated his 101st birthday in August. Also Lewis had been a member of the Philadelphia Section for all of those years. Lewis turned pro in 1925 and began his apprenticeship under John Edmundson at the Llanerch Country Club. Lewis’ apprenticeship was interrupted for one year during the “Great Depression” when he couldn’t find a job as an assistant, and had to find employment working in the locker room at Llanerch. He was elected to PGA membership on May 13, 1931.

Tiger Woods only played in 17 tournaments on the PGA Tour but he was the leading money winner with earnings of $10,508,163. That was over $4 million more than the second place golfer won. Woods was the PGA Player of the Year” and he won the Vardon Trophy with a stroke average of 68.05. Sean O’Hair was sixth on the money list as he won $4,316,493 in 23 tournaments. Jim Furyk finished seventh winning $3,946,515 in 23 tournaments. Jason Bohn won $1,159,936 in 25 tournaments and finished 81st. Rick Price won $66,689 in 21 tournaments, which put him in 216th place on the money list and sent him back to qualifying for a place on the 2010 PGA Tour.

For a second straight year Bernhard Langer led the PGA Senior Tour winning $2,139,451. Jay Sigel played in nine tournaments and won $33,999. Pete Oakley played in three tournaments and won $13,500.

Joe Daley played in 26 tournaments on the Nationwide Tour and won $61,938, which put him in 97th place on the money list. Tom Carter played in twelve tournaments and won $7,278.

The country, along with most of the world, was in a deep recession. Many golf facilities were struggling as the rounds of golf were down by large numbers. Husbands and wives were both working, if they could, in order to have a lifestyle they had been accustomed to. The jolt of the recession had hit people hard and for the first time in many years Americans were paying off debt and trying to save money rather than spend. In 2008 the U.S. stock market had plunged forty percent and even though it came back some in 2009 people weren’t confident about the future. Along with investments real estate values dropped dramatically also. Many families owed more for their home than it was now worth. Except in rare cases the golf facilities had taken over the sale of golf merchandise and the professionals were on salaries plus lessons and in some cases, certain incentives. Some golf courses, which had been in business for many years, were closing. One golf course had such bad credit it could not purchase merchandise. It had to give the golf shop back to the golf professional, who had much better credit. Along with all that there were too many golf professionals so it was a buyer’s market when it came to hiring a head professional.

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