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A Chronicle of the Philadelphia Section PGA and Golf in the Philadelphia Area
by Peter C. Trenham
2010 to 2013
   Contents

2010 In November Leo DeGisi was sworn in for a second three-year term as a PGA of America director.
2011 The Section celebrated its 90th birthday and Rich Steinmetz won the Section Championship for a third time
2012 Stu Ingraham won the Section Championship, Sr. Championship, Player-of-the-Year, points and scoring average.
2013 Harry Hammond won the PGA Bill Strausbaugh Award, Mark Sheftic was on the PGA Cup Team for a 3rd time.
2014 Lou Guzzi-teaching, Rick Kline-merchandising and Scott Nye-merchandising were honored with national awards.

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2010 - A new decade began with the country in a deep recession and the business of golf was in just as deep. There were more golf courses than there were golfers. Definitely, there were too many golf professionals. Some golf courses were closing which was the best for the business in general but difficult for the employees. One golf writer stated that for the first time more golfers were on waiting lists to get out of clubs in the United States that there were waiting to get into clubs.

In January the PGA made some changes to the apprentice program. One of those was that all applicants to the apprentice program would have to complete three online courses and pass a knowledge course before being allowed to register in the program.

In February Jeff Kiddie, who was now the professional at the Aronimink Golf Club hosted a Section education seminar. The seminar featured the Stack and Tilt golf swing method and its founders Andy Plummer and Mike Bennett. More than 100 Section members and apprentices were in attendance. Some were there to learn how to teach this new method to their golfers and some were there to try and incorporate it into their own games. As usual the seminars on golf instruction always drew the largest turnout.

In the third week of March Lancaster County’s Jim Furyk won the Transitions Championship at the Innisbrook Resort in Palm Harbor, Florida. The tournament was played on the resort’s 7,340-yard Copperhead Course. In spite of the length it was a course that required ball control which suited Furyk’s game. With rounds of 67, 68 and 67 he teed off in the final round with a three stroke lead over K.J. Choi. Choi proceeded to make birdies on four of the first six holes, which put him in a tie with Furyk. In the last round Furyk made six birdies but he also made four bogies. One of the bogies came on the 72nd hole. Playing the par-four last hole with a two stroke lead Furyk drove into the trees on the right side, shanked a long-iron second shot, put his next shot on the green and two putted for a one stroke victory. His 69 gave him a winning total of thirteen-under-par 271. It was Furyk’s fourteenth win on the PGA Tour. Choi finished second at 272. Bubba Watson was third at 273 and Nick Watney finished fourth at 275. There was a lengthy rain delay during the last round and play didn’t finish until 7:30. First prize was $972,000.


George Forster
2010 “Golf Professional of the Year”

The Section’s spring meeting was held at the Radnor Valley Country Club on the fifth Monday of March. The Section had 708 members and 154 apprentices which were employed at 590 golf facilities. Valley Country Club professional Clark Luis gave his usual powerful rendition of our national anthem. There were the usual reports from the various officers and committee chairmen. The Section’s executive director Geoff Surrette reported that the Section’s reserve fund was now valued at $511,800. The budgeted income for the year was $1,500,000 and the budgeted expenses were $1,475,000. Concord Country Club professional Mike Moses, the director of tournaments, announced that the "one ball rule" which had been in effect since the introduction of the solid golf ball, was being removed from the Section’s rule sheet. The tournament committee had decided that the golf balls were all so similar now that the rule was no longer necessary. Another rule was that all communication devices were not allowed during tournament rounds. That included use by the caddies. If a device was turned on it was considered to be in use. The Section’s instruction committee chairman Lou Guzzi, announced that the Section now had a website titled "The Lesson Tee". It could be found on the Section’s website under the "Guide to Golf" button. Guzzi managed a golf academy at the Talamore Golf Club. The Section’s 2009 "Teacher of the Year" Elizabeth Granahan was honored. She was the golf instructor and operator of three GolfTEC facilities in the western suburbs of Philadelphia. Radnor Valley Country Club professional George Forster, Sr. was honored as the Section’s 2010 "PGA Golf Professional of the Year". Forster had been the professional at Radnor Valley for seventeen years. He won the 1999 Philadelphia PGA Championship and in 2001 he won the Section’s match play championship. In 2008 Forster won the Section’s senior championship and beginning with 2006 he was the Section’s senior player of the year for four years. He had served on several Section committees, which included the tournament committee. Forster volunteered as a "Buddy" in the Variety Club program. He had hosted numerous Section events at Radnor Valley and supported the Section’s pro-ams by participating in more than 150 of them.

The Masters Tournament was played at the Augusta National Golf Club in the first full week of April as it had been for many years. As usual it was another exciting tournament. The weather was good and the scoring in spite of what was now a long golf course was torrid. There were 34 eagles made and 87 sub-par rounds. Phil Mickelson who was no stranger to success at August began the tournament with a 67 and a 71 which left him two shots off the pace. On Saturday Mickelson put together an eagle-eagle-birdie stretch on holes 13, 14 and 15 for a 67 but he still trailed the tournament leader Lee Westwood by one stroke. On Sunday Mickelson shot a bogey-free 67 which featured an eagle on the 13th hole after having driven into the pine trees on the right side. When it was all over Mickelson was in with a sixteen-under-par 272 and three stokes in front of the field. It was his third Masters victory. Lee Westwood finished second at 275 and Anthony Kim was third with a 276. Tiger Woods and K.J. Choi tied for fourth with 277 totals. Sean O’Hair tied for 30th at 291 and won $45,563. Jim Furyk missed the cut. First prize was $1,350,000. O’Hair and Furyk were in the tournament as winners on certain designated tournaments on the PGA Tour during the previous 12 months and for being in the top 30 money winners on the PGA Tour in 2009.

Jim Furyk missed the cut at the Masters Tournament but the next week he won the Verizon Heritage at Hilton Head, South Carolina. The tournament was once again hosted by the Harbor Town Golf Links in the third week of April. Furyk opened with a 67 and a 68 to lead by one stroke at the halfway point. Another 67 in the third round kept him one stroke in front of the field. On Sunday Furyk put together a steady 69 but when Brian Davis (68-69-66-68) made a birdie on the 72nd hole they were deadlocked and a playoff was needed to determine a winner. The two players returned to the par four 18th tee for a sudden-death playoff. Furyk was on in two but Davis’ second shot bounced off the left edge of the green into the wetlands. In playing his third shot Davis’ club head moved an unattached reed during his backswing. He asked the rules official for a ruling. After checking the television replays it was determined that his backswing had moved a loose impediment in the hazard. The penalty was two strokes. Davis played one more stroke and picked up. Furyk two putted for a par and the victory. Their 13-under-par 271s were three strokes better than anyone else. Bo Van Pelt and Luke Donald tied for second with 274s. First prize was $1,026,000.


Jason Bohn
2 Wins on the PGA Tour

Lewisburg’s Jason Bohn captured his second PGA Tour title in the fourth week of April at the Zurich Classic. The tournament was played on the 7,399 yard TPC Louisiana in Avondale, Louisiana. Bohn put five injury filled years behind him with the victory. He had two broken ribs in 2007 and in 2008 he had three back surgeries which confined him to bed for a month. The PGA Tour’s medical exemptions had made it possible for him to return to the tour. Bohn led from wire to wire with rounds of 65, 67, 71 and 67. Due to weather delays in the earlier rounds he had to play 30 holes on Sunday but he was not to be denied. On the par five 72nd hole he put a 148-yard pitching wedge next to the hole for a tap-in birdie. Bohn’s 18-under-par total of 270 won by two strokes. Jeff Overton finished second at 272. Troy Merritt was third with a 274 and Lee Janzen was fourth at 275. First prize was $1,152,000. The win qualified Bohn for the 2011 Masters Tournament.

Local qualifying in southern New Jersey for the U.S. Open was held at Galloway National Golf Club on the second Tuesday of May. Amateur Peter Barron III led with a two-over-par 73. Travis Deibert, who was an assistant at the Commonwealth National Golf Club, took the next spot with a 74. There were five spots to qualify for at Galloway National. Amateurs David Sanders (75), Geoffrey Cooper (75) and Thomas Gramigna (76) picked up the other three spots.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Philadelphia was held at The Springhaven Club on the third Monday of May. There were five qualifying spots to play for at Springhaven and four players finished tied for medalist honors. Jeffersonville Golf Club assistant Billy Mullen and Jonathon Rusk, who was playing the mini-tours out of Washington’s Crossing, along with amateurs Amory Davis and Ben Kohles all shot 69s. The last spot went to Whitford Country Club professional Mike Ladden at even par 70.

On the third Tuesday of May local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held in northern Pennsylvania at the Williamsport Country Club. There were two spots to qualify for at Williamsport. Williamsport mini-tour player Rick Piger III led with an even-par 71 and the other spot went to Florida mini-tour player Marc Mazza with a 72.

On the third Thursday of May local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at the Chambersburg Country Club. The USGA had allocated three spots to play for at Chambersburg. Blaine Peffley, a mini-tour player from Lebanon, led the qualifying with a five-under-par 68. Canadian professional Ken Tarling and amateur Zachary Herr won the other two places with 71s.

The Senior PGA Championship was held in the end of May at Parker, Colorado. The venue was the three-year old Colorado Golf Club. As a sign of the times in the golf business a clubhouse had not been constructed due to financial problems. Throughout the telecast of the tournament the lack of a clubhouse was not mentioned or pictured. The course measured 7,464 yards but it played ten percent shorter due to the altitude. After many near misses Tom Lehman won his first American major with rounds of 68, 71, 71 and 71. He was the only participant that broke par in every round, but he still had to play extra holes to wrap up the victory. Lehman, Fred Couples (69-68-75-69) and David Frost (72-77-65-67) all finished at nine-under-par 281. A sudden death playoff was held and the three players returned to the 18th tee. Couples’ drive came to rest in a bush with an unplayable lie. He took a penalty and made a double-bogey six. Frost drove into a fairway bunker, pulled his second shot well left of the green and made a double-bogey also. Lehman’s tee shot was in the fairway on the 445-yard hole. From 132 yards Lehman hit the green with a pitching wedge shot and two putted for the win. Mark O’Meara finished fourth at 283. Glenmaura National Golf Club professional Cleve Coldwater and Radnor Valley Country Club professional George Forster missed the cut and each received $1,000. They had qualified by finishing in the top 35 at the 2009 Senior PGA Professional National Championship. Forster had gotten in as an alternate. First prize from the $2,000,000 purse was $360,000.

The Haverford Trust Classic was held at the Sunnybrook Golf again. This year it was played on the first day of June which was the Tuesday after Memorial Day. Chris Wisler teed off at 7a.m. and at 11a.m. he posted a three-under-par 69. Some of the players weren’t scheduled to tee off for another three hours. In the afternoon electrical storms delayed play twice for a total of 85 minutes. The last players teed off at 4:05pm and completed their rounds near dark at 8:25. When it was all over Wisler, who was the teaching professional at the Tee It Up Golf driving range, still held the lead. The defending champion Travis Deibert had the best chance to win but he made pars on the last eleven holes to finish second with a 70. Overbrook Golf Club assistant Scott Hunter, Honey Brook Golf Club professional Ryan Gray and the Country Club at Woodloch Springs professional John Pillar tied for third with 71s. First prize was now $42,500 and the total purse was $60,300.

Bill Sautter won the 25th annual Burlington Classic on the first Monday of June at the Burlington Country Club. Sautter, a teaching professional at the Philadelphia Cricket Club, led from wire to wire. On Sunday two professionals were paired with three amateurs in a pro-am format. The professional scores counted toward their individual prizes. On Sunday Sautter shot a five-under-par 65 to lead by two strokes. The next day he shot a 71 to finish at 136, which won by one stroke. Merion Golf Club teaching professional Mark Sheftic finished second at 137. Cape May National Golf Club professional John Appleget (138) and Burlington member Jack Wallace (138) tied for third. Concord Country Club professional Mike Moses (139) and M Golf Range teaching professional Stu Ingraham (139) tied for fifth. First prize was $2,500 and the purse totaled $16,765.

On the first Monday of June Blaine Peffley qualified for the U.S. Open. Peffley qualified at the Canoe Brook Country Club in Summit, New Jersey and he led the field with (68-70) a six-under-par 138 total. There were four qualifying spots at Canoe Brook. Dan McCarty (140), Jim Herman (141) and Jon Curran (142) picked up the second, third and fourth spots. Jim Furyk and Sean O’Hair were exempt from both stages of qualifying off their positions on the world ranking.

The Variety Tournament of Champions was held on the third Tuesday of June at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club. The top thirty leaders from the 2009 Philadelphia Section points list plus ten invited professionals each were paired with three amateurs in a pro-am to raise money for the Variety Club charities. Travis Deibert put together a 69 on Tuesday and a 68 on Wednesday for a seven-under-par 137 to win my one stroke. Bala Golf Club teaching pro Bill Walker finished second with a 138. Hidden Valley Golf Club teaching professional Terry Hatch, Spring Ford Country Club professional Rich Steinmetz, Kings Creek Country Club teaching professional Chris Krueger and Scott Hunter tied for third with 140 totals. The purse was $10,000 and Deibert won $2,000.

The U.S. Open was back at the Pebble Beach Golf Links in Pebble Beach, California. The course was set up at 7,040 yards and par had been reduced to 71. The par-five second hole was played as a par-four. The course was dry and fast. The big names got off to poor starts. At the end of three rounds Dustin Johnson led by three shots at six-under-par. On Sunday Johnson fell apart early and never recovered as he posted a bidieless 82 and tied for eighth. Meanwhile Graeme McDowell (71-68-71-74), who was paired with Johnson, held it together well enough to stay in front of the rest of the field. McDowell finished at even-par 284 which was one better than French professional Gregory Harvet (285). Ernie Els finished third at 286. Phil Mickelson and Tiger Woods tied for fourth at 287. Sean O’Hair finished in a tie for 12th at 290 and won $143,714. Jim Furyk tied for 16th at 292 winning $108,458. Blaine Peffley missed the cut. First prize was $1,350,000.

Qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open was held at the Radnor Valley Country Club on the fourth Thursday of June. Three spots were available at Radnor Valley. Mike Donald, a veteran of the PGA Tour, led with a three-under-par 67. Bill Sautter won the second spot with a 69 and amateur Chris Lange picked up the third spot with a 71.

The PGA Professional National Championship was held in French Lick, Indiana at the French Lick Resort on the last four days of June. The tournament was televised by the Golf Chanel and ended on a Wednesday so as to not compete for viewers with the PGA Tour events. The Pete Dye Course and the Donald Ross Course were used for the first two rounds and the Pete Dye Course was used for the last two rounds after the cut. There were ten professionals from the Philadelphia Section in the starting field. Mike Small won the tournament for a third time. After a slow start on the final day Small (68-72-65-73) finished the round with three straight birdies and a total of 278 which won by three strokes. Sonny Skinner ended up in second place alone at 281. Mark Sheftic finished third at 283 and Danny Balin was fourth at 284. First prize was $75,000 and Sheftic won $34,000. Stu Ingraham finished ninth at 287 and won $14,250. Rich Steinmetz tied for 15th at 289 and won $6,176. By finishing in the top 20 Sheftic, Ingraham and Steinmetz qualified for the PGA Championship. Steinmetz made it right on the number and no playoff was needed. John Pillar also made the cut as he finished tied for 34th at 294 won $3,415. Cleve Clearwater, Bucknell Golf Club professional Brian Kelly, Sunnybrook Golf Club professional John Allen, Huntsville Golf Club professional Mike Molino, John Appleget and Dave McNabb, who was now the professional at the Applebrook Golf Club, missed the cut. Sheftic was exempt off his second place finish in 2009 and the others had qualified at the Philadelphia Section Championship. Deerwood Country Club professional Greg Farrow had qualified but didn’t enter the tournament and Mike Moses was entered but didn’t play in the tournament. Kelly got in as an alternate in place of Farrow.

On the first of July the PGA Tour returned to Philadelphia as the AT&T National. The tournament was hosted by the Aronimink Golf Club which measured 7,237 yards and was short by 21st century standards. When the 1962 PGA Championship was held at Aronimink the golf course measured 7,045 yards and it was considered to be a long setup. After opening with rounds of 69 and 64 it was England’s Justin Rose the rest of the way. A third round 67 left him four shots in front of the field. He began the final round with a bogey but a couple of birdies and a one-putt eagle on the ninth hole gave him a five-shot lead with nine holes to play. He took three putts on both the 10th and 11th holes and ten finished with seven straight pars for a round of 70. When it was all over Rose’s ten-under-par- 270 total won by one stroke. Ryan Moore made a late challenge with a 65, which was the low round of the day, to finish second at 271. Jeff Overton finished third at 272 and Charlie Wi was fourth at 273. Sean O’Hair tied for 11th at 278 and won $131,440. Jim Furyk tied for 33rd at 282 and won $31,388. First prize was $1,116,000 out of a purse of $6,200,000. The host professional was Jeff Kiddie.

The British Open was held at the Royal and Ancient Golf Club’s Old Course in St. Andrews, Scotland during the third week of July. Louis Oosthuizen added his name to the list of South African winners of the Open. After rounds of 65 and 67 he led by five strokes. He shot a 69 in the third round and led by four with a round to go. On Sunday Paul Casey got within three strokes but fell back. Oosthuizen finished with a 71, a sixteen-under-par 272 and a seven-stroke margin of victory. Lee Westwood was second at 279. Casey, Rory McIlroy and Henrik Stenson tied for third with 280 totals. McIlroy had led with a first round 63 but then he got caught in the wind on Friday and finished with an 80. He came back with 137 on the weekend. First prize was $1,305,593 in U.S. dollars. Sean O’Hair tied for seventh at 282 and won $186,239. Jason Bohn and Jim Furyk missed the cut. O’Hair and Furyk were in the field off their position in the world rankings. Bohn earned a late invitation by being one of three players in the top 20 on the 2010 Fed-Ex points list who were not already eligible.

The Philadelphia Open was played at the Philmont Country Club’s North Course on the third Wednesday of July. Michael R. Brown, a reinstated amateur from Lookaway Golf Club, and Greg Farrow completed the thirty-six holes tied at 142. The weather was hot and humid. Brown’s rounds were 70-72 and Farrow’s were 68-74. A four-hole playoff was held on holes 1, 2, 17 and 18. The two players finished the playoff still tied as they played the four holes in one over par. It was getting dark and the players were given the choice of going into a sudden-death right then or returning the next morning for the sudden-death playoff. They decided to continue and returned to the first hole. Both players were on the par-four green in two. Brown putted from 22-feet to within inches of the hole and tapped it in for a par. Farrow’s putt from 15-feet went three-feet past the cup. When Farrow missed his second putt Brown, who had worked as an assistant pro at North Hills Country Club for the recently deceased Ron Rolfe, became the thirteenth amateur to win the Philadelphia Open. As the low professional, Farrow took home the top check of $6,000. Bill Sautter finished third at 143. John Appleget and amateur Matthew Mattare, the son of Saucon Valley Country Club professional Gene Matttare, tied for fourth with 144 scores.

In the fourth week of July Travis Deibert won the Woodcrest Invitational for the second straight year. The two-day event was held at the Woodcrest Country Club. On Monday the professionals were paired with four amateurs in a pro-am format which raised money for Jewish charities. Deibert shot a 67 on Monday to lead by one stroke and a steady 70 on Tuesday iced the win. His five-under-par 137 total won by one-stroke. Greg Farrow and Little Mill Country Club professional George Frake both finished at 138 and tied for second. John Allen shot 139 and was fourth alone. First prize was $3,500.

The U.S. Senior Open was played at the Sahalee Country Club in Sammamish, Washington at the end of July. The tournament ended on the first day of August. Bernhard Langer and Fred Couples teed off in the final round tied for the lead. Couples took the lead with a birdie on the first hole but on the second hole he made a triple-bogey eight against a birdie for Langer. Langer never looked back. He tacked a 67 on to earlier rounds of 69, 68 and 68 to finish at eight-under-par 272. Couples was second at 275. Olin Browne and John Cook tied for third with 278 totals. First prize was $470,000. Bill Sautter, who had qualified in Philadelphia in June made the cut and tied for 65th. He won $5,854.

Don Allan won his last tournament before turning 50 as he captured the GALV Lehigh Valley Open in the first week of August. The tournament was hosted by the Northampton Country Club. Allan, who was the teaching professional at the Woodcrest Country Club, posted rounds of 67 on Monday and 69 on Tuesday. His eight-under-par 136 total won by two shots. Rich Steinmetz finished second at 138. Lehigh Country Club professional Wayne Phillips and George Forster finished with 139 scores and tied for third. First prize was $2,350 from a total purse of $14,020.

The Pennsylvania Open was held at the Applebrook Golf Club in the second week of August. The largest checks were won by mini-tour players. The course measured 6,815 yards and par was 71. Robert Rohanna, a mini-tour player from Western Pennsylvania led from wire to wire. Rohanna opened with a 67 on Monday. On Tuesday the scores were very low and Rohanna was the best with a 63. What was amazing was that he made a triple-bogey on the 18th hole after beginning his round on the 10th hole and still put together a round of eight-under-par. Even thought Rohanna stood at twelve-under-par with a round to play he only led by two strokes. On Wednesday he shot a steady 71 and his 201 final tally won by three strokes. Blaine Peffley finished second at 204. Amateur Zak Drescher ended up in third place with 205 strokes. Devon’s Billy Stewart who was playing the mini-tours, David Konieczny and amateur Andrew Mason tied for fourth with 207 totals. The low pros from the Philadelphia Section were John Pillar and Overbrook Golf Club professional Eric Kennedy who tied for ninth at 209. The purse was again $50,000 and first prize was $10,000.

Hanover Country Club assistant Richie Krebs won the Section Assistant Championship at the Philadelphia Cricket Club’s Wissahickon Course on the third Monday of August. In the morning round Krebs shot a two-under-par 69, which was the only round in the 60s. In the afternoon he posted a 70 and his 139 total won by two strokes. First prize was $1,250. Travis Deibert and Billy Mullen tied for second at 141. Chris Wisler and Applebrook Golf Club assistant Corey Katzen tied for fourth at 142. The tournament was the qualifying event for the PGA of America’s assistant championship and the Section had been allotted four spots, which was based on the number of entries. Krebs, Deibert and Mullen took the first three spots. Wisler won a sudden-death playoff with Katzen on the second hole for the fourth qualifying spot . The purse was $8,760.

The PGA Championship was played in the middle of August at the Whistling Straights in Kohler, Wisconsin. The tournament was played on the 7,507-yard Straights Course. It will always be remembered for its many bunkers, which were estimated at 1,200+, and what happened to Dustin Johnson on the 72nd hole of the tournament. Before the tournament began the PGA had posted a sheet stating that all sand was to be bunkers and thus to be played as hazards. Johnson teed off on the last hole with a one-stroke lead. His tee shot came to rest in one of those many bunkers. The small spot of sand that he had driven into was flat and so far to the right of play that the spectators had been standing in it. To compound the situation Johnson and his caddy had not bothered to read the posted statements concerning sand and bunkers. Not thinking that it was a bunker, Johnson grounded his four-iron in the sand and played toward the green. He missed the green, pitched up to within seven-feet of the hole and missed the putt. Thinking that he was now tied for first he was informed by the tournament’s leading rules official that there was a rules question that needed to be reviewed. After looking at the TV replays a two-stroke penalty was assessed. Martin Kaymer (72-68-67-70) and Bubba Watson (68-71-70-68) were now tied for the title with eleven-under-par 277 totals. A three-hole playoff was held, which Kaymer won with a 4-2-5—11 (par-birdie-bogey) against 3-3-6—12 (birdie-par-double bogey) for Watson. Rory McIlroy and Zack Johnson tied for third at 278. Dustin Johnson ended up in a three-way tie for fifth. Jim Furyk tied for 24th at 285 and won $58,600. Sean O’Hair, Stu Ingraham, Rich Steinmetz and Mark Sheftic missed the cut. Furyk and O’Hair were in the field as winners on the PGA Tour and other exemptions. Ingraham, Steinmetz and Sheftic had qualified at the PGA Professional National Championship in June. First prize was $1,350,000 and the total purse was $7,500,000. O’Hair, Ingraham, Steinmetz and Sheftic each received $2,500.

George Forster won the Section Senior Championship in the third week of August. The tournament’s first round was held at the DuPont Country Club’s DuPont Course and the second round was played at the Wilmington Country Club’s South Course. Forster led all the way. On Wednesday he posted a three-under-par 68 and he tacked on a 72 on Thursday. His 140 score was one better than the rest of the field. First prize was $1,000 and the purse totaled $4,370. This was also the qualifying event for the Senior PGA Professional National Championship. The Section had seven spots to qualify for. The first spot went to Forster and the next two places went to Philadelphia Country Club professional Jay Horton and Cleve Coldwater who tied for second with 141s. Back Creek Golf Club professional Nevin Sutcliffe, Don Allan and retired professional Ken Peyre-Ferry grabbed the fourth, fifth and sixth places with 142s. Brian Kelly finished seventh alone at 143 and won the last spot. Centre Hills Country Club professional Jeb Boyle (144) and Stu Ingraham (144) were alternates. The both got into the tournament along with Bill Sautter who had finished at 145.

The Whitford Classic was held at the Whitford Country Club in late August. On Sunday the professionals were each teamed with three amateurs in a pro-am format. The professionals’ scores counted toward a two-day individual tournament. The tournament ended in a two-way tie. Don DeAngelis (136), who was now the teaching professional at the Lu Lu Country Club, posted rounds of 69-67 and Scott Hunter (136) also posted rounds of 69-67. A sudden-death playoff was held, which began on the first hole. The two professionals halved the first four holes with birdies on the first hole and pars on the next three holes. On the fifth hole DeAngelis won out with a par against a bogey for Hunter. Bill Sautter finished third at 138 and Brian Kelly was fourth at 139. First prize was $5,000 and the total prize money came to $20,500.

The Shawnee Inn & Country Club hosted the Shawnee Open in the first week of September. There were a number of low scores on Monday but gusts of wind up to 40 miles per hour on Tuesday led to much higher scoring. Don Allan (136) picked up his second win in 2010 as he put together rounds of 67 and 69 for a three-stroke win. John Pillar came in second with a 139 score. Travis Deibert and Scott Hunter tied for third at 140. First prize was $1,500 and the purse totaled $8,175.


Rich Steinmetz
Two-Time Section Champion

Rich Steinmetz won the Philadelphia Section Championship for a second time in the fourth week of September. The tournament was hosted by the Concord Country Club for the fifth time and the third time in four years. There were 150 entries. On Tuesday Steinmetz jumped out to a five-stroke lead with a 63 which was topped off with an eagle three on the 18th hole. A steady round of 70 on Wednesday kept him three strokes in front. On Thursday Stu Ingraham, who was in second place, made a run at the lead. He and Steinmetz were paired together. With the par-five 18th hole left to play Ingraham trailed by two strokes. Steinmetz drove into the rough and his ball 11came to rest in a difficult lie. He played his second shot into the fairway short of the green. Ingraham’s tee shot was in the fairway and his six-iron shot ended up over the green. Steinmetz hit a lob-wedge to within four-feet of the cup. Ingraham chipped back close to the hole and tapped in his birdie putt. Steinmetz two putted to sew up the victory by one stroke. His final round 72 gave him an eight-under-par 205 total. Ingraham was second alone at 206. Mark Sheftic finished a distance third at 211. Greg Farrow was next in fourth place with 213. First prize was $7,000 from the total prize money of $62,400. This event was also qualifying for the 2011 PGA Professional National Championship. The Section had been allotted eleven qualifying spots, which was based on the number of entries in the Section Championship. Steinmetz, Ingraham and Sheftic were exempt off their finishes in the 2010 championship which had been played in June. The first spot went to Farrow, the second spot went to Laurel Creek Country Club professional John DiMarco (214) and the third spot went to Bent Creek Country Club professional Terry Hertzog (215). John Allen (216) and Dave McNabb (216) took the fourth and fifth spots. John Appleget (217), John Spina (217) and Bill Walker (217) won the next three places. The last three places went to Cleve Coldwater (218), Bill Sautter (218) and Rob Shuey (218) who was now the teaching professional at the Olde Scotland Yard Golf Center. The only playoff that was needed was for alternate places. The host professional was Mike Moses and he was also the first alternate with a score of 219.


Jim Furyk
Won FedEx Cup
$10,000,000 Bonus Prize

Jim Furyk capped off an outstanding year by winning the PGA Tour Championship and the FedEx Cup in the fourth week of September. The tournament was held at the East Lake Country Club in Atlanta, Georgia. Furyk put together rounds of 67, 65, 70 and 70 for an eight-under-par 272. Furyk came to the last three holes with a three-stroke lead. He made bogies on the 16th and 17th holes. On the par-three 18th hole Furyk’s tee-shot ended up in a greenside bunker. From there he played to within a couple of feet of the cup and holed the putt for the largest payday of his career, by far. First prize in the Tour Championship was $1,350.000 and he picked up a $10,000,000 bonus for winning the year-long FedEx Cup. Luke Donald finished second at 273 and Retief Goosen was next at 274. Nick Watney and Paul Casey tied for fourth with 275s.

The Ryder Cup was hosted by the Celtic Manor Resort in Newport, Wales on the first four days of October. The matches were played on the Twenty Ten Course. They were scheduled for the first three days of October but heavy rain arrived soon after the matches began on Friday. It rained so hard that play was soon stopped. For the first time in the long history of the Ryder Cup an extra day was needed to complete the matches. Even with that one of the five sessions was eliminated. A plan was devised to play for six points instead of the usual four in the second and third sessions. On Monday the twelve singles matches were played. The United States began the last session three points behind but rallied to win seven matches. It wasn’t quite enough. The final tally was Europe 14-1/2 to 13-1/2 for the USA. That was the same number of points that would have resulted if the usual five sessions had been played. Jim Furyk was on the team again. It was his seventh consecutive Ryder Cup. He won 1/2 point and lost 2-1/2 points.

The Senior PGA Professional National Championship was played in Indian Wells, California in the second week of October. The tournament was played at the Toscana Country Club and the Rancho La Quinta Country Club. Robert Thompson won the tournament. He had also won the 1986 PGA Assistant Championship. Thompson (280) put together rounds of 71, 69, 69 and 71 for a two-stroke victory. James Blair and Mark Faulkner tied for second with 282 totals. Ken Martin and Mike Lawrence tied for fourth at 283. Stu Ingraham, who was in the field as an alternate, tied for sixth at 284 and won $6,300. George Forster tied for 21st at 288 and won $2,703.57. Brian Kelly tied for 28th at 289 and won $2,200. For finishing in the top eight Ingraham was exempt for this tournament in 2011. By finishing in the top 35 Ingraham, Forster and Kelly qualified for the 2011 Senior PGA Championship. Bill Sautter (299), who was also there as an alternate, made the cut and tied for 65th winning $1,045. Jeb Boyle, Don Allan, Nevin Sutcliffe and Jay Horton missed the cut. Cleve Coldwater was exempt from his finish in the 2010 tournament and Ken Peyre-Ferry had qualified but they didn’t go to the tournament. Ingraham and Sautter replaced them. Boyle got in when the Section was given another spot in the tournament.

On the second Thursday of October the Philadelphia Section professionals and the Golf Association of Philadelphia amateurs met in their annual challenge match. The Ledge Rock Golf Club hosted the match on a very challenging day. The temperature was in the low 50s and the matches were played in a steady rain. There were 12 players on each team and two had to be seniors. Two professionals opposed two amateurs in each pairing. In each pairing there were two singles matches and a better-ball match. The PGA team of Travis Deibert-Mark Sheftic won all three of its points. The team of Brian Kelly-George Forster won 2-1/2 points. The team of John Allen-Don DeAngelis won 1-1/2 points. The teams of John Appleget-Don Allan and Chris Krueger-Tony Perla won one point. Bill Sautter and Matt Moroz, an assistant at the Torresdale-Frankford Country Club, were also on the team. Perla was the professional at the Bellewood Golf Club. The final tally was nine points for the PGA and nine points for the GAP. It was the fourth time that the matches had ended in a tie. The twenty-year record for the matches now stood at 15 wins for the PGA against one loss and four ties.

Mike Moses won the Section Match Play Championship in the third week of October at the Little Mill Country Club. The Little Mill and Devil’s Glen nines were used for the tournament. There were forty entries and the seeding was done from the Section’s points list through the Section Championship. In order to fill out the 64-man ladder there were 24 byes. This was the final tournament of the year which determined the points leader for the year. As it turned out none of the three leaders in points who were also the top three seeds made it past the quarterfinal round. The semifinals came down to Mike Moses, Jake Gerney, John Appleget and Bill Sautter. Moses defeated Appleget by 2&1 and Gerney eliminated Sautter by the same count of 2&1. In the finals Moses edged out Gerney, the teaching professional at the DuPont Country Club, by 1-down. All of the matches were scheduled for 18-holes. First prize was $750 and the purse totaled $4,200.


Leo DeGisi
PGA of America District Director
2002-2004 & 2011-13

The Section’s fall meeting was held at the DuPont Country Club on the fourth Monday of October. Medford Village Country Club professional/manager Leo DeGisi spoke on national affairs. When the national PGA meeting was held later in November DeGisi was going to begin serving a three-year term as our national director representing District II It was announced that nominations for the various Section awards could be made through the internet for the first time. The Section’s junior program had 87 events that year and 613 different juniors had participated in at least one event. The Section had contributed $50,000 to its reserve fund and the fund was now worth $584,200. The Section’s "Player of the Year" was Travis Deibert. Stu Ingraham won the DeBaufre Trophy for the second straight year with a scoring average of 70.82 stokes per round. Ingraham was also the Skee Riegel "Senior Player of the Year".


Joe Kirkwood, Sr.
First Great Trick Shot Artist
World Class Tournament Player

Joseph Henry "Joe" Kirkwood, Sr. was inducted into the Philadelphia Section PGA Hall of Fame at the Section’s fall meeting on the fourth Monday of October. Kirkwood was born in Australia in 1897 and learned to hit trick golf shots at a sheep station while watching over the animals. During World War I he entertained the wounded veterans with his assortment of golf shots. At the age of 23 he won the Australian Open, the New Zealand Open and the New Zealand PGA. The next year he traveled to the United States where he met Walter Hagen at the North and South Open. During the tournament he showed off his trick shots for the spectators and the players. When Hagen saw how much Kirkwood collected from a passing of the hat he knew that he had found a partner for his exhibitions. It became a friendship that lasted the rest of their lives. In 1923 Kirkwood moved to the United States and settled down in Glenside. He joined the Cedarbrook Country Club. For the next 15 years he represented several clubs on the East Coast but he always kept a home in the Philadelphia area and belonged to the Philadelphia Section PGA. Kirkwood was the first of the great trick shot artists and maybe the best ever. Kirkwood was a very good golfer, winning 13 times on the PGA Tour, which included the Canadian Open and the North and South Open. He won three straight tournaments in Texas in 1924, but he could make more money giving exhibitions. By 1925 he was charging $500 for a performance. He traveled the world with Hagen. In the 1930s the country was in the "Great Depression" and the golfers didn’t have money to pay to see trick golf shots. In 1938 Kirkwood became the professional at the Huntingdon Valley Country Club and stayed there through 1949. After World War II the golfers returned to the courses and Kirkwood left Huntingdon Valley to take his trick shot show on the road again. Kirkwood estimated that he played more than 7,000 golf courses during his career and he probably introduced golf to more people than anyone in the history of the game.

The national PGA meeting was held in Boston, Massachusetts during the first week of November. It was hosted by the New England PGA Section at the Westin Copley Place hotel. It was an election year. Allen Wronowski was elected president without opposition. Ted Bishop was elected vice president, also without opposition. Six PGA members ran for the office of secretary. Derek Sprague was elected on the fifth ballot. Two resolutions were presented and voted down by the delegates. Leo DeGisi and six other PGA members were sworn in as District Directors for the next three years. For a second time DeGisi would be representing District II, which was composed of the Philadelphia Section, Metropolitan Section and New Jersey Section. The Philadelphia Section delegates were Philadelphia Cricket Club teaching professional Mark Anderson and Medford Lakes professional Dan Haskell. Past presidents Dick Smith, Sr. and Jack Connelly were also in attendance along with the Section’s alternate delegates and its executive director Geoff Surrette.

Andy Barbin was honored at the national PGA meeting in the first week of November as the winner of the President’s Plaque. The award was for Barbin’s contributions to player development and growing the game of golf. Barbin, who had been the professional and part owner of the Chesapeake Bay Golf Club for seventeen years, had been doing just that for many years before the PGA created "Play Golf America" in 2004. He had been a two-time winner of the President’s Plaque in the Philadelphia Section. Along with managing golf at Chesapeake Bay Barbin had been involved with promoting golf in other places and with charities. He and Majestic Ridge golf professional John Rogers had created the Victory Golf Pass and the Victory Golf Show several years before. The golf pass promotes golf at 212 facilities in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware and New Jersey. For the past three years Barbin had managed the three-day golf show which had attracted a total of 30,000 golfers. Through the golf show, the victory pass and Barbin’s charity the Victory Hope Foundation more than $150,000 had been contributed to charities.

The Philadelphia Section assistants made a good showing in the PGA Assistant Championship in the second week of November. The tournament was played at the PGA Golf Club’s Wanamaker Course in Port St. Lucie, Florida. The tournament was won by Frank Bensel (70-69-69-69) as he put together an eleven-under-par 277. Travis Deibert made a move in the final round with a 68 but he came up two strokes short and finished second at 279. Deibert won $6,500. Dan Flynn and Adam Rainaud tied for third with 280s. Billy Mullen finished tied for 33rd at 292 and won $740. Chris Wisler tied for 40th at 293 and won $675. Richie Krebs missed the cut. First prize was $9,000.

Matt Kucher was the leading money winner on the PGA Tour and he won the Vardon Trophy with a stroke average of 69.61. Jim Furyk was the "PGA Player of the Year". Kucher had earnings of $4,910,477 in 26 tournaments, but Furyk was a close second with $4,809,622. Furyk entered 21 tournaments and won three times along with leading in FedEx Cup points, which was worth $10,000,000. Jason Bohn played in 25 tournaments as he finished in 40th place winning $1,904,763. Sean O’Hair was 41st on the money list as he won $1,859.040 in 25 tournaments.

Bernhard Langer was the leading money winner on the PGA Champions Tour. He won $2,738,939 in 24 tournaments. Jay Sigel played in nine tournaments and won $45,138. Pete Oakley won $8,750 in two events. Bill Sautter won $5,854 in one tournament. Joe Daley played in one tournament and won $2,500.

Jamie Lovemark led the PGA Nationwide Tour in money winnings as he won $452,951 in 22 tournaments. Rick Price played in 18 events and won $15,564. Vince Covello got into two tournaments and won $6,240.

In late December Kennett Square Golf & Country Club professional Tom Carpus was appointed vice-chairman of the PGA of America rules committee. He had been on the committee for more than 15 years but this meant that he was now in position to someday become the Co-Chairman of the committee.

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2011 - In early February the Philadelphia Section announced that it was going to begin an internet media blitz. The Section already had its website which contained information on everything that it was involved in from tournaments and junior golf to golf instruction. The Section was now launching accounts on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. The Section officers had realized that their member professionals were checking their Facebook accounts more often than their emails. The Section’s Junior Tour would also be on these accounts. Section updates would be sent directly to its members’ smart phones.

The Philadelphia Section was having its 90th birthday on December 2nd so the officers decided that it should be celebrated all twelve months of 2011. Pete Trenham, the Section’s historian, and Howard Cohen an independent director were asked to head up a committee for the celebration. At the request of the Section office Trenham put together 90 weekly historical happenings that had occurred during the 90 years. Each week one of the highlighted pieces of Section history was shown on the Section’s website. After that Trenham and a company named Telra put together a video which told the 90 year history of the Section. Telra had been in the business of creating football highlight films for major colleges. Along with that Trenham and a graphic arts company made up eight panels of photos which depicted the Section’s history. The panels showed off the Section’s presidents, national presidents, national award winners, playing legends, charitable projects, PGA Championships hosted and the winners of major championships. In the second week of February at the three-day East Coast Golf Show the Section made the first presentation of the video and the panels. The Section professionals also gave free lessons and the Section staff promoted the 2011 Philadelphia PGA Junior Tour. For the remainder of 2011 the video and panels were on display at Section meetings, pro-ams and other occasions. Also Trenham put together 52 highlights from the Section’s 90 years. The highlights were taken from the Section’s history which Trenham had compiled. The history, beginning in 1895 when the first U.S. Open was played, was on the Section’s website. Each of the 52 highlights began with something like "52 years ago this week such and such happened".


Philadelphia PGA Hall of Fame Collage 1992 - 2010


Andy Barbin
PGA of America “President’s Plaque”
2010 Honoree
2011 “Golf Professional of the Year”
Philadelphia PGA
The spring meeting of the Philadelphia Section was held at the Hershey Country Club on the fourth Monday of March. The meeting was there because the Hershey Country Club was going to be hosting the PGA Professional National Championship in late July. Due to the size of the field both the West and East courses at Hershey were going to be used for the first two rounds and 700 volunteers were needed to make the tournament a success. The 90th anniversary video was played to open the meeting and the eight panels depicting the Section’s history were on display. It was now the electronic age and for the first time all of the officer and committee reports were emailed to the Section members before the meeting. In the past you received the reports and agenda when you checked in at the meeting but now you had to print them out yourself and take them to the meeting if you wanted to have them with you. Allen Wronowski, the president of the PGA of America, was a guest speaker. As of January 31 the Section’s reserve fund contained $632,402. The officers had decided to now put $25,000 into the reserve fund each year instead of the $50,000 that it had been. The other $25,000 was going to be spent on growing the business of golf. The Section awards were presented at the meeting. Lou Guzzi, owner and operator of the Lou Guzzi Golf Academy which was at Talamore Country Club and Applecross Country Club, was the 2010 "Teacher of the Year". Andy Barbin was the Section’s 2010 " PGA Golf Professional of the Year". Barbin had spent many hours promoting the game of golf and serving on Section committees. He had been the professional and part owner of the Chesapeake Bay Golf Club for seventeen years. He had been a two-time winner of the President’s Plaque in the Philadelphia Section. Along with managing golf at Chesapeake Bay Barbin had been involved with promoting golf in other places and with charities. He and John Rogers had created the Victory Golf Pass and the Victory Golf Show several years before. The golf pass promotes golf at 212 facilities in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware and New Jersey. For the past three years Barbin had managed the three-day golf show which had attracted a total of 30,000 golfers. Through the golf show, the victory pass and Barbin’s charity the Victory Hope Foundation more than $150,000 had been contributed to charities.

The Masters Tournament was in its usual place and time. Played on the Augusta National Golf Club’s course it was once again held in the first full week of April. It will always be remembered as the tournament that Rory McIlroy had sewed up and didn’t win. With one round to play he led by four strokes but a final round of 80 (37-43) left him in tenth place and ten strokes behind the winner. Eight players held at least a share of the lead during the final round. One of those was Charl Swartzel (69-71-68-66) who birdied the last four holes to finish two strokes in front of the field at 274. Along with the green jacket he won $1,440,000. Jason Day and Adam Scott tied for second at 276. Tiger Woods (278), Geoff Ogilvy (278) and Luke Donald 278 tied for fourth. Jim Furyk tied for 24th at 286 and won $70,400. Sean O’Hair and Jason Bohn missed cut. Furyk and Bohn were in the field as winners of tournaments in the past twelve months. O’Hair was there off his position in the world ranking.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in south Jersey was held at the Hidden Creek Golf Club on the second Tuesday of May. There were four spots to qualify for at Hidden Creek. Christopher Gold, a Haddonfield, New Jersey mini-tour player, birdied the last hole to lead the field with an even par 70. Christopher Gray, who was now working in the New Jersey Section was second with a 71. Jonathon Gibbs and amateur Michael Kania won the third and fourth spots with 72s.

Applebrook Golf Club hosted local qualifying for the U.S. Open on the second Thursday of May. There were 95 players qualifying for seven spots at Applebrook. Italian professional Marcello Santi and amateur Gary Carpenter, Jr. led with four under par 67s. Eric Beringer won the third spot with a 68. Michael Tobiason, a teaching professional at the Applecross Country Club, Jonathon Rusk and North Carolina professional Chad Wilfong took the next three spots with 70s. Billy Stewart won the seventh and last spot in a three-man sudden-death playoff.

On the third Monday of May the Country Club of Harrisburg hosted the local qualifying for the U.S. Open in central Pennsylvania. The USGA had allotted three spots in Harrisburg. Two Maryland professionals, Jeffrey Williams (66) and Charles Woodward (71), won the first two places. Amateur Matthew Maurer took the third spot with a 72. Par was 71.

Huntsville Golf Club hosted the local qualifying for the U.S. Open in northeastern Pennsylvania. There were just two spots to qualify for at Huntsville. Williamsport’s Matthew Schall who was playing the mini-tours led with a three-under-par 69. Jonestown’s Tyler Brewington, who was also playing the mini-tours won the other spot with a73.

The Senior PGA Championship was played at the PGA’s Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville, Kentucky during the last week of May. Tom Watson won another major championship with rounds of 70, 70, 68 and 70. To win he had to win a sudden-death playoff over David Eger (74-68-69-67). After finishing tied at ten-under-par 278 they returned to the 18th tee for sudden death. Watson made a birdie on the par-five-hole and the playoff was over. First prize was $360,000. Kiyoshi Murota (279) finished third and Hale Irwin (280) was fourth. Stu Ingraham tied for 60th at 299 and won $3,917. Joe Daley tied for 68th at 303 and he won $3,700. Brian Kelly and George Forster missed the cut and they each received $1,000. Ingraham, Kelly and Forster had qualified at the 2010 Senior PGA Professional National Championship. Daley was there on a special invitation from the PGA of America.

On the fourth Monday of May the Philadelphia Section held a pro-am at the Aronimink Golf Club to celebrate its 90th anniversary. The Section members invited amateurs to play with them and 41 four-man teams entered. Thirteen of the teams played in the morning. In the evening there was a dinner. Section historian Pete Trenham gave a short talk on the formation and early years of the Philadelphia Section. The Section’s 90th anniversary video was played after Trenham spoke. The keynote speaker at the dinner was the Golf Channel’s analyst Rich Learner, who grew up in Allentown and had graduated from Temple University’s School of Journalism.

On the fifth Tuesday of May Twining Valley Golf Club teaching professional Hugh P. Reilly won the Haverford Trust Classic and its very large first prize. Reilly put together seven birdies and eleven pars for a 65 and a two-stroke victory. Travis Deibert, who had won this event in 2009, had a chance to catch Reilly when he put his second shot on the last hole 18-feet from the hole. He missed the putt and missed again to finish with a 67. That didn’t cost him any money as he was still four strokes ahead of the rest of the field. Squires Golf Club assistant Shawn Matthews, Linfield National Golf Club assistant Kevin Melrath and Jake Gerney who was now the teaching professional at Trump National Philadelphia tied for third with 71s. First prize was now $45,000. Deibert won $5,000. The total purse was $60,400.

On the first Monday of June Tavistock Country Club professional Rick Hughart won the two-day Burlington Classic at the Burlington Country Club. On Sunday two professionals were paired with three amateurs in a pro-am format and the professionals’ scores counted for the two-day professional purse. The golf course was set up easier the first day in order to get the large field around the course. Hughart posted a 67 the first day to trail the leader by two strokes. On Monday he was four-under-par when he teed off on his last hole. He didn’t play the hole well but he holed a downhill 30-foot putt for a par for a 69 and a 36-hole total of 136. Hughart edged out Rich Steinmetz (137) by one stroke. First prize was $2,500. John Appleget, who was now the teaching professional at the Wildwood Golf & Country Club, finished third at 138. Travis Deibert and David Quinn, who was the owner and professional at the Links Golf Club, tied for fourth with 139 totals. The purse totaled $14,780.

John Appleget won the Variety Tournament of Champions at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club in the middle of June. The first day the professionals were each paired with three amateurs in a pro-am to raise money for Variety Club charities. Appleget made four birdies on his last nine-holes to post rounds of 69 and 68 for a seven-under-par 137. That was two strokes better than Terry Hatch who finished second at 139. Bill Sautter finished third with a 140. Dave McNabb, John Pillar and David Quinn tied for fourth with 141s. First prize from the $15,950 purse was $3,000.

On the first Monday of June Michael Tobiason qualified for the U.S. Open at the Woodmont Country Club in Rockville, Maryland. There were ten spots at Woodmont and the scores were low. Kirk Triplett led with a 133. Tobiason (69-66) tied for third at 135. It took a score of 136 to qualify there. The only playoff needed was for alternates. Jim Furyk was exempt from both local and sectional qualifying off his position in the world rankings.

In April twenty-two-year-old Rory McIlroy had failed to hold what looked like a comfortable lead at the Masters Tournament but the U. S. Open was another story. The tournament was held at the Congressional Country Club in Bethesda, Maryland in the third week of June. The course measured 7,574-yards but par took a beating. McIlroy set the tone on opening day with a six-under-par 65, which put him out in front of the field by three strokes. The next day he shot a 66 to increase his lead to six strokes. A 68 on Saturday gave him a nine shot lead and a steady 69 on Sunday left the rest of the players in his wake. McIlroy’s 268 score as the lowest in U.S. Open history and at 16-under-par it was also a record for the most strokes under par. Jason Day (276) finished second as he shot a last round 68 to pick up one stroke on McIlroy. Robert Garrigus, Kevin Chappell, Lee Westwood and Y.E. Yang tied for third with 278s. Jim Furyk and Michael Tobiason missed the cut. Furyk had been fully exempt from qualifying and Tobiason had made it through both local and sectional qualifying. First prize was $1,440,000. Twenty players finished the 72 holes under par.

Qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open was held at various sites in the country but was none in the territory that comprised the Philadelphia Section PGA.

The Philadelphia Section and the Hershey Country Club hosted the PGA Professional National Championship in late June. The East and West Courses were both used for the first two rounds and the final two rounds were on the East Course. All four rounds of the tournament were televised by the Golf Channel and the tournament was played on Sunday through Wednesday so as to not interfere with the telecast of the PGA Tour’s AT&T National tournament that began on Thursday at Aronimink Golf Club. The Philadelphia Section had 15 of its members in the starting field. The Section members didn’t fare as well as hoped. Only four made the cut and no one qualified for the PGA Championship, which was one of the reasons for this event. The tournament was won by David Hutsell in a three-man sudden-death playoff. Hutsell (69-70-67-68), Faber Jamerson (68-67-69-70) and Scott Erdmann (65-68-69-72) had finished tied at eleven-under-par 274. The playoff began on the par-three 16th hole. Erdmann went out on the first hole with a bogey and Hutsell made a birdie-three on the next hole to wrap up the victory. First prize was $75,000. Danny Balin shot a 63 in the last round to finish fourth at 276. Mike Moses, who had gotten into the tournament as an alternate when a former champion withdrew, led the Philadelphia Section contingent. He finished tied for 43rd with a 288 total and won $2,695. Stu Ingraham tied for 48th at 289 and won $2,440. Bill Sautter posted a 293 and tied for 68th winning $1,787.50. Cleve Coldwater tied for 76th at 296 and won $1,587.50. Mark Sheftic, Bill Walker, Dave McNabb, Rich Steinmetz, John DiMarco, Rob Shuey, John Allen, John Appleget, Terry Hertzog, Greg Farrow and John Spina missed the cut. Ingraham, Sheftic and Steinmetz had been exempt off their finish in the tournament the year before. The others had qualified in the 2010 Philadelphia Section Championship. The host professional was Ned Graff.

The next day, which was the first Thursday of July, the AT&T National kicked off at the Aronimink Golf Club for a second straight year. The scores were pretty low and they were especially low on Saturday. Nick Watney was the winner with rounds of 70, 69, 62 and 66 for a thirteen under par 267. K.J. Choi was tied for the lead after 14 holes but a double-bogey on the 15th hole put him two strokes behind. Choi and Watney both birdied the par-five 16th hole and they both made pars on the last two holes. Choi finished second at 269. Charles Howell III, Jeff Overton and Adam Scott tied for third with 271s. First prize was $1,116,000. Sean O’Hair and Jim Furyk missed the cut. The host professional was Jeff Kiddie. The prize money totaled $6,500,000. Thirty-three players finished under par for the 72-holes.

In the second week of July the New Jersey Open was played at the Hollywood Golf Club in Deal. Kevin Foley (68-68-69) won with an eight-under-par 205. Sam King (210) was second and Brian Gaffney (211) was third. David Quinn tied for fourth with Frank Esposito and Brent Studer at 212. First prize was $15,000.

The British Open was played in the middle of July at Royal St. George’s Golf Club in Sandwich, England. Darren Clarke, who had played in many major golf championships, won his first one at the age of 42. Phil Mickelson, who had never come close to winning a British Open, put together a front nine 30 on Sunday morning. With just nine holes to play he was tied for the lead with Clarke. Clarke (68-68-69-70) held steady and Mickelson missed some short putts on the back nine. Dustin Johnson had a chance as he trailed by two shots playing the 14th hole, but a 2-iron second shot to the par-five green sailed out-of-bounds and he was finished. When it was over, Clarke’s 275 total won by three strokes as Mickelson and Johnson tied for second with 278s. Thomas Bjorn finished fourth at 279. Jim Furyk tied for 48th at 292 winning $23,552. Sean O’Hair made a double-bogey on the last hole to miss the cut by one stroke. First prize was $1,451,830 in U.S. dollars.

The Philadelphia Open was held at the Huntingdon Valley Country Club on third Wednesday of July. The winner was a member of Huntingdon Valley. Twenty-two-year-old Andrew Mason became the eighth amateur to win the tournament and he did it in style. He began his morning round on the first tee and made birdies on three of the first four holes. He finished the round with a 65. There was only one other round in the sixties all day and that was a 68 by former champion Graham Dendler, who was now the professional at the Trenton Country Club. The 65 was a competitive course record for Huntingdon Valley. In the afternoon Mason shot a steady 70 and his seven-under-par 135 was seven strokes better than Stu Ingraham (142) who finished second. Ingraham took home a check for $7,000 as the low professional. Mark Sheftic and amateur Matt Mattare tied for tied for third at 143. There were 72 players in the starting field which had been determined by pre-tournament qualifying rounds and exemptions.

One week after missing the cut at the British Open Sean O’Hair won the Canadian Open. The tournament was played in the third week of July at the Shaughnessy Golf and Country Club in Vancouver, British Columbia. At the end of regulation play O’Hair (69-73-66-68) and Kris Blanks (67-71-69-69) were deadlocked for the title at four-under-par 276. On the first playoff hole O’Hair made a bogey, but Blanks made a double-bogey and O’Hair was the Canadian Open champion. Andres Romero finished third at 277. Geoff Ogilvy and Adam Hadwin tied for fourth with 278s. First prize was $936,000.

The two-day GALV Lehigh Valley Open was played in the first week of August at the Northampton Country Club. At the end of the 36-holes Stu Ingraham (69-69) and David Quinn (68-70) were tied for the top prize with six-under-par 138 totals. The two players were sent back to the 18th tee for a sudden-death playoff. Both players were on the green in the regulation two strokes but Quinn had left himself a downhill putt. Quinn three-putted and Ingraham two-putted for the win. First prize was $2,125. Scott Hunter and Waynesborough Country Club assistant Elliott Wilson tied for third with 139 totals. The total purse came to $14,950.

The U.S. Senior Open was played on the last four days of July at the Inverness Club in Toledo, Ohio. Olin Browne was the winner and for someone who had won just three times on the PGA Tour and had not won on the PGA Senior Tour it was a great time to win. His closest competitor was Mark O’Meara but with rounds of 64, 69, 65 and 71 his fifteen-under-par 269 won by three strokes. First prize was $500,000. Rain softened the course and the scores were very low. For Sunday’s final round the USGA lengthened the course to 7,164 yards which led to higher scores. O’Meara was second alone at 272. Mark Calcavecchia finished third at 273. Hale Irwin and Joey Sindelar tied for fourth with 274s.

Mark Sheftic won his first major tournament when he was victorious in the Pennsylvania Open in the second week of August. Sheftic had experienced a great deal of success locally and in national PGA events but he didn’t have a major title. The three-day tournament was played at the Moselem Springs Golf Club. Sheftic put together rounds of 69, 65 and 71 for a five-under-par 205. It ended up being a tight finish. A 3-wood tee shot on the last hole ended up lost in the trees on the left. He had played a provisional ball from the tee and he played that ball to the par-four green. Two putts from forty-feet sewed up a one-stroke win. Pittsburgh’s Kevin Shields was second at 206. Stu Ingraham, Terry Hatch and Reading amateur Nathan Sutherland tied for third with 209s. First prize was $10,000.

The PGA Championship was held at the Atlantic Athletic Club’s Highland Course in Jones Creek, Georgia during the second week of August. In the final round Keegan Bradley overcame a triple-bogey on the 15th hole to win the tournament. At that point he trailed Jason Dufner by five strokes. Bradley (71-64-69-68) then made birdies on the next two holes and a par on the 18th hole. When Dufner (70-65-68-69) made bogies on the last three holes they were tied at the top of the leaderboard with 272 totals. A three-hole playoff was held to determine the winner. In the playoff Dufner went par-bogey-birdie against a birdie and two pars for Bradley. Bradley was the first to win a major championship with a belly-putter and only the third player to win the first major that he had ever played in. Bradley’s father was a PGA member. Anders Hansen finished third at 273. David Toms, Scott Verplank and Robert Karlsson tied for fourth with 275s. Jim Furyk tied for 39th at 284 and won $30,250. Sean O’Hair tied for 64th at 291 and won $15,400. Furyk and O’Hair were in the field off their position on the 2010 PGA Tour money list. First prize was $1,445,000 and par was 70.

The Section Senior Championship was played at the Ace Club in the third week of August. Stu Ingraham had been on a hot streak for five weeks and he didn’t stop there. A 71 in the first round on Wednesday kept him in contention and a brilliant 65 on Thursday left the field in his wake. No one else broke 70 on Thursday. His eight-under-par 136 was three strokes better than Greg Farrow (139) who finished second. First prize from the $6,725 money pool was $1,350. Retired professional Ken Peyre-Ferry (140) finished third and Northampton Country Club professional Gary Hardin (142) was fourth. The event was also qualifying for the Senior PGA Professional National Championship. Based on the entries in this tournament the Section had been allotted eight spots in the national championship. Ingraham was exempt off finishing in the top eight at the tournament the year before so the first three spots went to Farrow, Peyre-Ferry and Hardin. Retired professionals Harvey Williams and Jimmy Booros won the fourth and fifth spots with 144s. Bill Sautter and Radley Run Country Club professional John Kellogg took the sixth and seventh places with 145s. John DiMarco (146) won a sudden-death playoff over Brian Kelly (146), George Forster (146) and Wayne Phillips (146) for the eighth spot. Peyre-Ferry didn’t go to the tournament. Kelly took his place and Forster was later added to the field.

The Penn Oaks Golf Club and its managing partner Harry Hammond hosted a new Section event, Pro-Am for Wishes, in the fourth week of August. The tournament was scheduled for a Sunday and Monday. On Sunday the professionals were paired with amateurs in a pro-am to raise money for charity. At mid day on Sunday heavy rain suspended play and no more golf was played that day. Some of the players had not even begun their rounds. On Monday only the professionals returned to the course to complete the first round and play the second round. When it was all over Scott Hunter (69-65) was the winner with an eight-under-par 134. Brian Kelly finished second at 137. Stu Ingraham (138) was third and Travis Deibert (139) was fourth. First prize was $4,500 and the prize money totaled $21,300.

It turned out to be the wettest year in Philadelphia’s history. There was thirteen inches of rain in August alone. As a result of that several tournaments weren’t played. The Whitford Classic and the Shawnee Open were canceled because the courses were not playable.


Rich Steinmetz
Section Champion for a 3rd Time

In the third week of September the White Manor Country and the St. Davids Golf Club hosted the Section Championship. Due to the size of the entry and the time of year a second course was needed for the first two rounds. It was about one month before the tournament was played that St. Davids answered a call to be a second host club. The contestants played one round on each course and then the field was cut to the low 60 and ties. St. Davids measured 6,559 yards and par was 70. White Manor measured 7,009 yards and par was 71. At the end of 36 holes Chris Krueger had a three-stroke lead with a 136 total. Stu Ingraham was in second place and three others which included the defending champion Rich Steinmetz were one stroke further back. In the final round on Thursday Krueger fell back. The tournament came down to Steinmetz and Ingraham (72-67-71—210). When Steinmetz (69-71-69—209) birdied the last two holes he was the Section champion for a third time. The total prize money came to $65,000 and Steinmetz won $7,000. Bill Sautter finished third at 211. Krueger (213) and Jake Gerney (213) tied for fourth. The tournament was also the qualifier for the PGA Professional National Championship. The Section had been allotted eleven places to qualify for. The first five places were won by Steinmetz, Ingraham, Sautter, Krueger and Gerney. John Pillar picked up the sixth spot with a 214 total and John Appleget took the seventh spot with a 215. Dave Quinn (217) and Big Swing Golf Center teaching professional Sean Driscoll (217) won the eighth and ninth places. There was a three-way tie at 218 for the last two spots between Brian Kelly, George Forster and Rob Shuey. To break the ties a sudden-death playoff was held, which began on the first hole. The playoff only lasted one hole as Kelly and Forster eliminated Shuey, who made a bogey. The host professionals were White Manor’s Mark Levine and St. Davids’ Dean Kandle.

The Section Assistant Championship was played at the Trump National Golf Club on the fourth Monday of September. Neil Maurer, an assistant at The Peninsula Golf & Country Club, was the winner with rounds of 71 and 68. His three-under-par 139 edged out the host club’s Jake Gerney (140) by one stroke. Lancaster Country Club assistant Rusty Harbold and Aronimink Golf Club assistant Brian Keiser tied for third at 142. This event was also qualifying for the PGA National Assistant Championship. There were four spots to qualify for so Maurer, Gerney, Harbold and Keiser were going to be representing the Section. First prize was $1,400 from a purse of $8,760. Travis Deibert was exempt off his second place finish in the national tournament the year before.

In early October the Senior PGA Professional National Championship was held in Virginia at the River Creek Club in Leesburg and the Creigton Farms club in Aldie. Kirk Hanefeld had a huge lead after 36 holes with rounds of 66 and 67. His last two rounds, which included a birdie on the last hole, were 74-75 and it was just enough. His six-under-par score of 282 won by one stroke. Ken Martin finished second at 283. Darrell Kestner and Craig Stevens tied for fourth with 288s. Bill Sautter tied for 24th at 296 and won $2,515. George Forster tied for 29 at 297 and he won $2,200. By finishing in the top 35 Sautter and Forster qualified for the Senior PGA Championship. Stu Ingraham wound up in a tie for 36th at 299 and won a seven-man playoff for the first alternate spot by making a birdie on the first hole of sudden-death. He won $1,875. Pete Oakley, who was in the field as a former winner, tied for 40th at 300 and won $1,650. Brian Kelly and Jimmy Booros tied for 56th with 303 totals and they each won $1,130.71. Greg Farrow tied for 63rd at 304 and won $1,065. Gary Hardin tied for 82nd at 311 and won $885. John DiMarco, Harvey Williams and John Kellogg missed the cut. Ingraham had been exempt off his finish in 2010 and other than Oakley the others had qualified at the Section Senior Championship. First prize was $20,000 from a purse of $285,000.

On the second Thursday of October the Philadelphia Section professionals played a challenge match against the Golf Association’s amateurs. There were twelve players on each team and two had to be seniors. In each four-man pairing there were two singles matches and a better-ball match. The teams of John Appleget-Rich Steinmetz and Chris Krueger-Jake Gerney along with the senior team of Bill Sautter-George Forster each won three points. The Scott Hunter-Mark Sheftic team won two points. The Stu Ingraham-Hugh P. Reilly team won ½ point. The other members of the team were David Quinn and Brian Kelly. The final score was 11-1/2 points for the Philadelphia Section and 6-1/2 points for the GAP. The record for the 21 years of these matches stood at 16 victories for the PGA against one win for the GAP and four had ended in ties.


Mark Sheftic
PGA Cup Team 2011
Pennsylvania Open Winner 2011

In the third week of October Mark Sheftic was in San Martin, California as a member of the winning PGA Cup Team. The matches were played at the CordeValle golf course. The U.S. team won with 17-1/2 points to 8-1/2 for the team from Great Britain & Ireland. The teams played two four-ball matches and two foursomes matches along with singles on the final day. Sheftic played in all five rounds of matches and won three points. He was victorious in one of each of the formats and lost in two of the partner matches.

The Section Match Play Championship was played at the Little Mill Country Club in the third week of October. The Little Mill and Devil’s Glen nines were used for the event. There were 46 entries so there were 18 byes in order to fill out the 64-man ladder. The tournament began on Monday with two rounds of matches each day. Wednesday was rained out and the final two rounds were played on Friday. The semifinalists were Travis Deibert, Greg Farrow, Dave McNabb and David Quinn. Deibert defeated Farrow by 3&2 and Quinn got past McNabb by 2&1. In the final Quinn beat Deibert 2&1. The prize money totaled $5,350 and first prize was $1,000.

Dan Haskell
Section President 2011

The fall meeting of the Philadelphia Section was held at the Blue Bell Country Club on the fourth Monday of October. It was an election year. Mark Anderson stepped down as president and Dan Haskell was elected without opposition. Haskell was the 39th president of the Philadelphia Section PGA. John Pillar moved from secretary to vice president and Ian Dalzell moved from Director of Section Affairs to secretary. Mike Moses was reelected Director of Tournaments. John Rogers was elected Director of Section Affairs. The guest speaker was Sean Foley, a Canadian professional who was coaching PGA Tour players including Tiger Woods and Hunter Mahan. Foley spoke during the meeting and then stayed after lunch to answer questions on the golf swing and teaching high profile golfers. Bob Baldassari from the PGA of America presented the PGA’s new program to grow the next generation of golfers. The Section’s "Player of the Year" was Stu Ingraham and he was also the Skee Riegel "Senior Player of the Year". It was the first time that anyone had won both awards in the same year. Ingraham also won the DeBaufre Trophy with an average of 70.2 strokes per round in the designated tournaments. It was the fifth time that Ingraham had won the DeBaufre Trophy.

Jay Weitzel
Hershey CC Professional 38-Years
One of the PGA’s Most Respected Professionals

Jay Jack Weitzel was inducted into the Philadelphia PGA Hall of Fame at the Section’s fall meeting on the fourth Monday of October. Weitzel was introduced to golf as a caddy at the Manor Country Club in Reading. While in high school he won the Pennsylvania High School championship and worked for his brother Johnny who was the professional at the Colonial Country Club. At that time Jack Grout was a neighboring professional at the Country Club of Harrisburg. When Grout became the professional at Sciota Country Club he took Jay to Ohio with him. While at Sciota he spent 21 months fighting in the Korean War and watched a young Jack Nicklaus come through their junior golf program. During that time Johnny Weitzel became the professional at the Hershey Country and in 1956 he died from injuries sustained in an automobile accident on the way home from a golf tournament. Jay was hired to replace his brother. He was the first professional at Hershey who was more interested in the members than he was in his own golf game. As a result of having worked at Sciota Jay understood what a properly managed golf program could do for a club’s membership. Jay introduced tournaments for the members, shot-gun starts, junior golf clinics and golf carts. Over the years he managed more than one golf course. There was the Hershey Park Course that was open to the public and Juvenile Course that was open just to children and their guests. When the Hershey Lodge opened in 1966 there was a golf course there as well. In the meantime Jay could see that the clubhouse, which had been Milton Hershey’s home, was too small for a busy country club. He began to sell his ideas of building a new clubhouse in a better location, the addition of a second 18-hole course and an expanded practice area. In 1969 the East Course opened and the members moved into a new clubhouse, which was located between the original (now called West Course) and the new course. Jay and Hershey Country Club hosted the Pennsylvania Open 12 times and the LPGA Lady Keystone Open 17 times. As a player he qualified for two U.S. Opens and a PGA Championship. For 38 years he was one of the most respected golf professionals in the country. As the head professional at Hershey more than a dozen assistants who worked under him went on to be head professionals. In 1981 Jay was the Section’s "Golf Professional of the Year".

The PGA Assistant Championship was hosted by the PGA Golf Club in Port St. Lucie, Florida during the first week of November. The tournament was played on the par-72 Wanamaker Course. Frank Bensel came from eight strokes back to win the tournament for a second straight year. A combination of howling winds and a 66 allowed Bensel (283) to edge out six other players by one stroke. His earlier rounds were 72, 73 and 72. Jamie Broce, Richard Terga, Tyler Hitchcock, Ryan Sikora, Aaron Clark and Scott Berliner tied for second at 284. First prize was $9,000 out of the $100,000 purse. Travis Deibert tied for 21st at 289 and won $1,008.33. Rusty Harbold (298) tied for 50th and won $600. Jake Gerney, Michael Paukovits and Brien Keiser missed the cut. Deibert was exempt off his second place finish in the tournament the year before. Harbold, Gerney and Paukovits qualified at the Section assistants’ championship and Paukovits, an assistant at Stonewall, got in as the first alternate when the Section assistant’s champion didn’t go to the tournament.

The leading money winner on the PGA Tour was Luke Donald. He won $6,683,214 in the 19 tournaments that he entered and he had two victories. He was also the "PGA Player of the Year" and he won the Vardon Trophy with a stroke average of 68.86. Along with all of that he was the leading money winner on the European PGA Tour. Some of the winnings like the U.S. Open and British Open counted on both money lists. Jim Furyk finished 53rd on the money list with winnings of $1,529,690 in 26 tournaments. Sean O’Hair won $1,483,948 in 24 events which was good for 57th place. He didn’t have a good year but he won the Canadian Open which saved it for him. Jason Bohn fell to 150th place on the money list as he won $411,943 in 22 tournaments.

Tom Lehman led the PGA Senior Tour in earnings with $2,081,526 in 21 tournaments. Joe Daley got into seven tournaments and won $69,905. Jay Sigel played in six tournaments winning $11,796. Stu Ingraham played in one event and won $3,917.

The leading money winner on the PGA Nationwide Tour was J. J. Killeen as he won $414,273 in 25 tournaments. Ted Tryba played in one event and won $1,976.


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2012 - At the beginning of the year there was a change made to the rules of golf. The new rule stated that "If it is known or virtually certain that the player did not cause his ball to move, Rule 18-2b, does not apply." Therefore if a player’s ball is moved by wind or gravity he is not penalized even though he may have taken his stance. That would be the case even if the ball was in a hazard.

The PGA of America’s 95th annual meeting was held during the fourth week of January at the Hilton Orlando in Orlando, Florida. The meeting was now being held in January every two years in conjunction with the PGA Merchandise Show. In an attempt to grow the game, which was badly needed, the PGA and other golf organizations rolled out Golf 2.0. The main idea of the plan was to make the game more enjoyable for the average golfer. A change was that as of the new fiscal year PGA members over 65 had to earn just 12 recertification points and they could earn the points by attending meetings or education seminars. Section president Dan Haskell and vice president John Pillar were the delegates representing the Philadelphia Section. Past national presidents Dick Smith, Sr. and Jack Connelly along with our district director Leo DeGisi were also in attendance. The Section was also represented by its executive director Geoff Surrette.

John Rogers
Horton Smith Award Winner 2012

Later in the week at the PGA Merchandise Show two Philadelphia Section members were honored. John Rogers was presented with the Horton Smith Award for education. For thirteen years Rogers had been the education chairman for the Philadelphia Section. He had won the award at the Section level six times. Rogers co-authored an educational manual for the physically impaired golfer. He also has partnered with Penn State University and the Salute Military Golf Association to develop a Wounded Warrior’s Program and other education programs. Rogers got his start as a golf professional in 1984 working for Howard Kramer at the Host Farm Resort & Golf Club. After that he continued his apprenticeship at the Chambersburg Country Club and the Country Club of York. He left the Section for a head professional position in Virginia. In 1993 Rogers returned to the Section as the professional at the Majestic Ridge Golf Club. He was now the Director of Section Affairs for the Philadelphia. Section. Jeff Kiddie was named merchandiser of the year for private clubs. Kiddie was the son of a former golf professional who became a pro-golf salesman who worked under the famous Ernie Sabayrac. From that he developed an interest in golf apparel. In 2008 he became the head professional at the Aronimink Golf Club. Since taking over at Aronimink he had increased the golf shop sales by 39 percent. Kiddie had won the award twice at the Section level.

Jeff Kiddie
Golf Professional of the Year
Philadelphia PGA 2012

The Section’s spring meeting was held on the first Monday of April at the Radnor Valley Country Club. There was a large turnout as 328 members and apprentices were in attendance. The Section now had 929 members with 235 being head professionals. A major topic of the meeting was "Golf 2.0" which was project of all the national golf organizations to promote golf in the United States. As usual the Section’s junior golf program was of major interest. A total of 733 juniors had played in at least one of the Section’s junior tour events in 2011, which was an increase of 50. A highlight of the 2012 season was a final event at Saucon Valley Country Club for the seasonal event winners and the leading players from each age group. Education programs for the Section members were enhanced with an announcement that the Section was now going to underwrite some of the education expenses. In previous years the education program was run at breakeven with the members in attendance paying enough to cover the costs. The featured speaker was Mike Malaska, the "PGA-Teacher-of-the-Year". The Philadelphia Section’s "Teacher-of-the-Year" was Mark Sheftic. The Section’s 2011 " PGA Golf Professional of the Year" was Jeff Kiddie who was also the PGA of America’s Merchandiser of the Year for private clubs in 2011. Kiddie’s father was a golf professional and a pro golf salesman in western New York. Jeff had been an assistant in Rochester, New York before coming to the Philadelphia Section in 1999. In 2001 he moved into his first head professional position at the Applebrook Golf Club and soon after that he became the general manager as well. In 2008 he moved to Aronimink Golf Club as the head professional. In 2010 and 2011 he hosted the PGA Tour AT&T National tournament. In his four years at Aronimink he had increased the golf shop sales by 39 percent. With all of that Kiddie had found time to serve on the Section’s board as a district director.

The Masters Tournament was played at the Augusta National Golf Club in its usual timeslot, the first full week of April. As it almost always does the tournament had an exciting finish. The fireworks started at the 2nd hole on Sunday when Louis Oosthuizen holed out a four-iron shot from 253-yards for a double-eagle two. That put him in the lead by two strokes and he played even par golf from there to the finish. He never relinquished the lead but four straight birdies on holes 13 through 16 allowed Bubba Watson (69-71-70-68) to finish tied for the title with Oosthuizen (68-72-69-69) at 278. The two players were sent back to the 18th tee for a sudden-death playoff. Watson had missed a makeable birdie putt on the 72nd hole and in the playoff he missed another makeable putt for a birdie and the victory. The hole was halved with par fours. Next they played the 10th hole. The left-handed Watson pulled his drive into the pine trees. Oosthuizen hit a fairway club from the tee and his next shot was short of the green. From 148 yards Watson hit a sweeping hook with a wedge from the pine straw to within ten feet of the pin. Oosthuizen failed to get down in two and Watson two putted for a par and the title. Phil Mickelson, Lee Westwood, Matt Kuchar and Peter Hanson tied for third with 280 totals. Jim Furyk finished 11th at 285 and won $200,000. Sean O’Hair tied for 32nd at 291 and won $45,280. First prize was $1,444,000.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in southern New Jersey was held at the Trump National-Philadelphia golf club on the second Thursday of May. There were six spots to qualify for. Lancaster’s Jarred Texter, who was playing the mini-tours, won the medal with a wind-swept two under par 69. David Quinn posted a 70 to take the second spot. Christopher Gray who was now working in the New Jersey Section and Michael Tobiason picked up the next two places with 71s. Mt. Laurel’s David Sanders, who was playing the mini-tours, and amateur Max Marsico posted 72s and won out in a four-man sudden-death playoff for the last two spots.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Delaware was held at the Back Creek Country Club on the second Monday of May. There were two spots to qualify for at Back Creek. Michigan’s Steven Cuzzort who was starting work at Back Creek the next day led with a four under par 67. Amateur Greg Matthias, who was the son of Jim Matthias, turned in an even par 71 and won a two hole sudden-death playoff for the other spot.

Toftrees Golf Club hosted the local qualifying for the U.S. Open in central Pennsylvania on the second Monday of May. There was just one spot to qualify for there. Amateur Eric Williams shot a two over par 74 and won a sudden-death playoff .

On the third Wednesday of May Colonial Country Club hosted local qualifying for the U.S. Open. There were three spots available at Colonial which had been the Colonial Country Club. Manheim’s Andrew Turner led with a one under par 70. Blaine Peffley and Colonial Golf & Tennis Club assistant Steve Swartz picked up the other two spots with 71s. Turner and Peffley were competing on the mini-tours.

In the fourth week of May the Senior PGA Championship was held at the Golf Club at Harbor Shores in Benton Harbor, Michigan. A 53-year-old British professional who had never won many tournaments found his game at the right time as he led the tournament from start to finish. He began with a 68 to lead by one stroke and tacked on a 67 in the second round. He was then tied for first with John Cook. A third round 64 gave him a five stroke lead with one round to play. Some very low rounds were shot on Sunday but not by the leaders. No one was able to give Chapman much of a challenge and even though he made bogies on three of the last five holes he won by two strokes. Chapman’s final round 72 gave him a total of 273 and margin of two strokes over John Cook (273). Chapman’s 54-hole total of 199 tied a tournament record made by Sam Snead. Hale Irwin finished third at 274. Joe Daley, David Frost, Bernard Langer, Sandy Lyle and Peter Senior tied for fourth. First prize was $378,000 and Daley won $74,400. George Forster, Stu Ingraham, Bill Sautter and Pete Oakley missed the cut and each received $1,000. Forster, Ingraham and Sautter had qualified at the Senior PGA Professional National Championship. Ingraham had been the first alternate. Daley was in the field off his position on the 2011 Champions Tour money list and Oakley had a special invitation from the PGA of America.

On the fifth Tuesday of May the Haverford Trust Classic was again held at the Sunnybrook Golf Club. The sponsor, George Connell, had added another $5,000 to the first prize. That made it $50,000 which was the largest first prize of any PGA Section event in the country. Scott Reilly, who was the new head professional at the Philadelphia Country Club and had never played the Sunnybrook course before, won the tournament by five strokes. Reilly made five birdies along with holing out a wedge shot for an eagle two on the sixth hole as he posted a six under par 66. John DiMarco was the only other player that finished under par as he posted a 71 to pick up a check for $5,000. Rob Shuey, Sunnybrook assistant Jeff Fraim, Eric Kennedy and Baywood Greens Golf Club assistant Michael Rushin tied for third with even par 72s. The total purse came to $67,950. There were 129 professionals and 15 amateurs in the starting field.

Jason Bohn qualified for the U.S. Open in Suwanee, Georgia on the first Monday of June. Bohn led the qualifying for three available spots at the River Club with rounds of 65 and 70. His seven under par 135 was one shot better than Casey Wittenberg (136). Bohn had been exempt from local qualifying.

Travis Deibert won the Burlington Classic on the first Monday of June at the Burlington Country Club. The two-day event began on Sunday with a pro-am. Two pros were paired with three Burlington members or guests and the pro scores counted in the final standings for the individual championship. On Sunday Terry Hatch put together a seven under par 63 which led the field by three strokes. On Monday Hatch slipped to a 72 and Deibert (66-68) was able to edge him out with his 134 total. Hatch (135) finished alone in second place. John Pillar and Rick Hughart tied for third at 136. First prize was $2,500 and the total purse came to $15,400.

The Variety Club’s Tournament of Champions was played at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club in the second week of June. On the first day of the two day event each professional was paired with three amateurs in a pro-am format to raise money for the Variety Club charities. The first day Terry Hatch was tied for the lead with a four under par 68. The second day there were blustery winds and the golf course was set up more difficult. None of the 44 professionals were able to break 70 and there were just two who turned in 70s. Hatch shot what he thought was an average round of 74 but his 142 total was good enough as he won by one stroke. Chris Krueger put together one of the 70s and finished tied for second at 143 with Rich Steinmetz. Stu Ingraham 144) and Jake Gerney (144) tied for fourth. First prize was $3,100 from a total purse of $15,950.

Joe Daley qualified for the U.S. Senior Open on the second Thursday of June at the Edina Country Club in Edina, Minnesota. There were five spots to qualify for at Edina as the PGA Senior Tour had been competing nearby the week before. Jim Rutledge was the medalist with a four under par 68. Daley tied for the fourth and fifth spots with a 71.

In the third week of June the Olympic Club hosted the U.S. Open for a fifth time. With 36 holes to play four players were tied for the lead at one under par. One of those was Jim Furyk. At the end of 54 holes Furyk still held a share of the lead which he maintained for most of the last round. On the par 5 16th hole he teed off with a fairway metalwood, hooked it into the trees and made a six. Another bogey on the 18th hole gave him a 283 total which put him in a five-way tie for fourth. Webb Simpson (72-73-68-68) was not on anyone’s mind as he trailed by six strokes with two rounds to play. A 68 on Saturday left him three shots back and another 68 on Sunday put him in the clubhouse at one over par 281. When everyone either faltered or failed to make a move Simpson won the championship. Graeme McDowell and Michael Thompson tied for second with 282 totals. Furyk, David Toms, Jason Dufner, Padraig Harrington and John Peterson tied for fourth at 283. For the ninth straight playing of major championships the winner was a first-time winner of a major. Furyk won $276,841. Jason Bohn (301) finished 71st and won $16,833. The total purse was $8,000,000 and first prize was $1,440,000. Furyk was in the field off his world ranking and Bohn got there through sectional qualifying.

Bob Lennon qualified for the U.S. Senior Open at the Laurel Creek Country Club on the third Tuesday of June. There were three spots to qualify for at Laurel Creek. The first two spots went to Maryland amateurs Peter Detemple and David Nocar as they posted three under par 68s. Lennon, the teaching professional at the Wilmington Country Club, picked up the third and last spot with a 69. The players that shot 70 played off for alternate spots. There were 88 pros and amateurs entered there.

The PGA Professional National Championship was played in Seaside, California in the fourth week of June. The tournament was hosted by the Fort Ord Golf Club at its Bayonet and Black Horse courses. As it had been for many years the tournament was qualifying for the PGA Championship. Matt Dobyns (68-68-69-70) won going away as he put together a thirteen under par 275 and won by eight strokes. The eight stroke margin of victory broke the old record of five strokes that had been set by Sam Snead in 1971. Kelly Mitchum and Rod Perry tied for second at 283. Mike Small finished fourth alone at 284. The professionals from the Philadelphia Section didn’t fare well. Only David Quinn made the cut as he tied for 50th at 296 and won $2,300. John Appleget missed the cut by one stroke at 149. Rich Steinmetz, Chris Krueger, Bill Sautter, George Forster, Stu Ingraham, John Pillar, Rob Shuey, Jake Gerney, Brian Kelly and Sean Driscoll also missed the cut. They had all qualified at the 2011 Philadelphia Section Championship and Shuey had been the first alternate. First prize in the tournament was $75,000 and the total purse was $550,000.

Joe Daley
Won a major on the Senior Tour

On the first of July Whitemarsh Township’s Joe Daley won the Senior Players Championship which was a major tournament on the PGA Champions Tour. The tournament was played at the Fox Chapel Golf Club near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Daley who had won twice on the PGA’s second tour but had never won on the PGA Tour was in the tournament off his fourth place finish at the Senior PGA Championship in May. Daley opened up with a 66 and a 64 but he still trailed the leader Fred Couples by one stroke. A third round 68 put him in a tie for the lead with Mark Calcavecchia. Daley stood on the last tee with a one stroke lead. After a solid tee shot and a good second shot he was on the front edge of the par five hole in two and needed just three putts to win. His first putt rolled twenty feet past the cup but he holed the next one coming back to win by two strokes. His last round 68 gave him a fourteen under par total of 266. Tom Lehman who had put some pressure on Daley with a birdie on the last hole finished second at 268. Olin Browne was next at 269. Couples (270) and Calcavecchia (270) tied for fourth. Daley’s first place check was $405,000 which was by far the largest check he had ever won. Daley was now exempt on the Champions Tour for 12 calendar months.

The U.S. Senior Open was held in the middle of July at the Indianwood Golf & Country Club in Lake Orion, Michigan. The golf course was designed in 1928 by Wilfrid Reid, who was a founding member of the Philadelphia Section, in 1921. In what was somewhat of an amazing turn of events it was the Englishman Roger Chapman who won. After 25 years on the European PGA Tour and only one victory he had won a senior major championship for the second time in six weeks. In May Chapman had won the Senior PGA Championship which was also played in Michigan. After opening with rounds of 68, 68 and 68 on the par 70 Old Course at Indianwood he trailed the leader Bernhard Langer by four strokes. A final round of 66 vaulted him past Langer who faltered a bit. Chapman’s total of 270 won by two strokes. Langer, Corey Pavin, Fred Funk and Tom Lehman tied for second at 272. First prize was $500,000. Bob Lennon, Pete Oakley and Joe Daley missed the cut. Lennon and Daley were there through sectional qualifying. Oakley was there on a special invitation from the USGA.

On the fourth Monday of July Pine Valley Golf Club hosted the Philadelphia Open for a fourth time. The defender, amateur Andrew Mason (70-74), put together a four over par 144 to hang on to the title for another year. There were 41 amateurs and 31 professionals in the field. A two-tee start was used for both rounds with the players beginning one round from the first tee and one round from the ninth tee. Mason birdied the 475-yard par four 18th hole in the morning for an even par 70, which was two better than the rest of the field. In the afternoon round he made a bogey on his last hole, the 326-yard eighth hole, but he was still two strokes in front of everyone else. The last player to defend his title was Frank Dobbs in 1991. Travis Deibert and amateur James Kania, Jr. tied for second at 146. Dave McNabb and Chris Krueger tied for fourth at 148. Only eight players broke 150 for the 36 holes and no one broke par in either round. As the low professional, Deibert won $10,000 from the $50,000 purse. Tickets to the event were available at $10 with all proceeds going to the J. Wood Platt Caddie Scholarship Fund. 1,417 people purchased tickets.

Ernie Els won his fourth major championship at the British Open on the fourth Sunday of July. He had now won two U.S. Opens and two British Opens. The venue was the Royal Lytham & St. Acnes golf club at Lytham St. Annes, England. Late in the day on Sunday it appeared that Adam Scott would be the winner. He began the final round with a four stroke lead. With four holes to play Scott still lead by four strokes, but he finished with four straight bogeys. While Scott was making bogeys Els was making pars. At the 72nd hole Els holed an 18-foot putt for a birdie and when Scott who was playing in the pairing behind Els bogeyed Els was the Open champion again. Els (67-70-68-68) had picked up seven strokes on the last nine with a 32 and finished at 273 which was one better than Scott (274). Brandt Snedeker and Tiger Woods tied for third at 277. Par was 280 and Els won $1,405,890 in U.S. dollars. Jim Furyk tied for 34th at 284 and won $40,615. Els used a belly-putter and Scott used a long-putter.

Stu Ingraham won the Lehigh Valley Open for a second straight year on the last two days of July. The tournament was sponsored by the Lehigh Valley Golf Association and held at the Northampton Country Club. After posting a one over par 73 on Monday it seemed doubtful if Ingraham would be able to defend his title but Tuesday was a new and different day. Ingraham changed putters on Tuesday and set the course on fire. Ingraham had been using a long putter for several years and he was changing to a different model. He made five birdies on the front nine and four more on the back nine for a 63. David Quinn who led the first day with a 67 played well as he tacked on a 70 for 137 but Ingraham’s 136 total edged him out by one stroke. Quinn had finished second in the tournament in 2011, losing to Ingraham in a sudden death playoff. Jake Gerney and Tony R. Perla, who was an assistant at the Radnor Valley Country Club, tied for third at 138. The total purse was $15,600 and first place paid $2,225.

The Section Assistants Championship was played at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club on the first Monday of August. This was also the qualifying event for the PGA Assistant Championship and based on the 78 entries the Section had been allotted five places. Southmoore Golf Club assistant Nathan Fry was the winner with rounds of 72 and 67, but he had to win a sudden death playoff over Steve Swartz who had posted rounds of 68 and 71. Their five under par 139 totals edged out Barry Dear (140) who was now the teaching professional at the Links Golf Club and Shawn Matthews (140) by one stroke. Richie Krebs picked up the fifth spot with a 141. The total purse was $9,060 and first prize was $1,250.

Stu Ingraham won the Section Senior Championship in the second week of August at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club. On Tuesday Ingraham shot a 69, which left him one stroke out of the lead, and on Wednesday he was around in 66 strokes. His seven under par total of 135 was three strokes better than the rest of the field. First prize was $1,325. This was also the qualifying event for the Senior PGA Professional National Championship. Based on the number of entries the Section had been allotted nine spots. Cleve Coldwater finished second at 138 and Don Allan was third with a 1139. Rob Shuey, Don DeAngelis, who was now the teaching professional at the Center Square Golf Club, and Jim Masserio, the teaching professional at the Applebrook Golf Club, tied for fourth with 140s. George Forster (141) picked up the seventh spot and Brian Kelly (142) grabbed the eighth spot. The nine spot went to Bill Sautter (143). Greg Farrow finished alone at 144 and was the first alternate. When Masserio didn’t go to the tournament Farrow took his place. The total purse was $7,550 and there were 48 entries.

In the second week of August Rory McIlroy won the PGA Championship by eight strokes which was exactly how many strokes he had won the U.S. Open by the year before. The tournament was played at Kiawah Island, South Carolina on the Kiawah Island Golf Resort’s Ocean Course. At 7,676 yards it was the longest course in the history of the PGA Championship. As usual the PGA Championship had the strongest field of the year. The scoring was quite good as the golf course had been eased up since the Ryder Cup was held there in 1991. Also the players only faced one windy day, which came on Friday. The average score for Friday’s round was the highest in a PGA Championship since the second round at Llanerch Country Club in 1958. A score of 150 made the cut for the weekend. McIlroy began with a 67 and he survived Friday with a 75. A rain interrupted third round of 67 put him three shots in front of the field. Play on Saturday had been curtailed with all of the leaders still on the golf course. McIlroy had nine holes left to play on Sunday and some had more. In the final round McIlroy blew away the field with a bogey-free 66 for a thirteen under par 275. His eight-stroke margin of victory was a record for the PGA Championship. On Sunday only Ina Poulter made a run at McIlroy as he birdied six of his first seven holes, but he was still three back. 38-year old Englishman David Lynn who was playing in his first U.S. major finished second at 283. The defender Keegan Bradley, Justin Rose, Carl Peterson and Poulter tied for third with 284 totals. First prize was $1,445,000. Jim Furyk tied for 42nd at 292 and won $25,750. Sean O’Hair missed the cut.

The Pennsylvania Open was held at the Nemacolin Woodlands Resort near Farmington in the middle of AuAugust. The 54-hole tournament was played on its 7,550 yard Mystic Rock Course. Clayton Rotz, a native of Chambersburg who was playing the mini-tours, won by three strokes with an 11 under par 205. His rounds were 66, 66 and 73. Mike Van Sickle and Kevin Shields tied for second at 208. John Popeck was fourth at 210. The low professional from the Philadelphia Section was Stu Ingraham who tied for 11th at 215.

In the third week of August Dave McNabb won the Pro-Am for Wishes Tournament at the Penn Oaks Golf Club. The scores were very low on what was usually a difficult golf course. The first day the professionals were paired with amateurs in a pro-am format. In Sunday’s first round McNabb shot a six under par 65 which gave him a tie for the lead. On Monday the pros were paired together to compete for the $2,875 first prize. McNabb tacked on a 67 to finish at 132 and win by two strokes. John Appleget was second with a 134 total. Tony R. Perla shot a 65 on Monday which was the low round of the day and ended up alone in third place at 136. Alex Knoll, the assistant at the Bethlehem Golf Club, and Brian Bergstol, the assistant at the Shawnee Inn & Country Club, tied for fourth with 138 totals.

Stu Ingraham
Section Champion
Section Senior Champion
2012

For the second straight year the Philadelphia Section Championship was scheduled to be held at White Manor Country Club and St. Davids Golf Club in the third week of September but rain and wet grounds forced some changes. On Tuesday the first round was rained out and when St. Davids could not guarantee that golf carts would be available on Wednesday all rounds were moved to White Manor. The plan then was to have a double shotgun start on

Wednesday and Thursday with the final round moved to Friday. On Wednesday morning White Manor was not ready for play until later in the morning, which brought about a new plan. Half of the field played on Wednesday and the other half played its first round on Thursday. So after one full round of play the field was cut to the low 60 and the tournament was shortened to 36 holes. At the completion of 36 holes on Friday afternoon two of the oldest players in the field were tied at the top of the leader board. 52 year old Stu Ingraham (70-68) made a bogey on the last hole and wound up in a tie with 61 year old Greg Farrow (68-70) at four under par 138. A sudden death playoff began on the first hole. The first extra hole was halved with bogey fives when Farrow took three strokes from behind the green and Ingraham missed a two-foot putt. The next hole was halved with two putt par fours. The par three third hole was played from 200 yards. Farrow missed a long birdie putt and then Ingraham holed a birdie putt from 25 feet to win the Section championship for a second time. Both Ingraham and Farrow putted with long putters. Ingraham was second only to Marty Furgol as the oldest winner of the Section Championship. When Furgol won in 1970 he was 54. Rich Steinmetz, Eric Kennedy and Jake Gerney tied for third at 139. The Section Championship was also the qualifying for the 2013 PGA Professional National Championship. The Section had been allotted twelve spots. The first five spots went to Ingraham, Farrow, Steinmetz, Kennedy and Gerney. Barry Dear, Travis Deibert and Aronimink Golf Club assistant John Bierkan took the next three spots with 141 totals. Terry Hatch and Brian Kelly won the ninth and tenth places with 142s. The last two spots went to Dave McNabb and Rick Hughart who posted 143s. Ingraham took home a check for $7,500 and a watch. The total purse was $70,955. There were 192 entries but some had to withdraw when the tournament was extended another day.

The Ryder Cup matches were played on the Medinah Country Club’s number 3 course in Medinah, Illinois at the end of September. Jim Furyk was on the team for the eighth time. At the end of the first day the USA led by 5 to 3 and at the finish of Saturday’s play the USA led 10 to 6. It seemed like the home team was on the way to an easy victory but on Sunday things were different in the twelve single matches. Furyk, in the eighth pairing, lost to Sergio Garcia one-down and that was the way it went for the USA. Furyk had won the two other matches he was involved in. The USA only won three singles matches and halved one. When it was all over the European PGA was on top by the count of 14-1/2 to 13-1/5.

On the second Thursday of October the Applebrook Golf Club hosted the challenge match between the Philadelphia PGA and the Golf Association of Philadelphia. The match was closely contested but the golf professionals edged out the amateurs by one point, 9-1/2 to 8-1/2. Some of the Section’s top players were not available as they were in Virginia playing in the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship. There were 12 professionals and 12 amateurs on each team and at least two had to be seniors. There were 12 singles matches and six better-ball matches. The team of Travis Deibert-Dave McNabb won their three matches and the 3 points. The Mike Moses-Jeff Fraim team won 2-1/2 points. The Tony R. Perla-Eric Kennedy team won 2 points and the Jim Masserio-Rick Flesher team won 1 point. The Barry Dear-Bill Walker and Mark Sheftic-Jake Gerney teams each won 1/2 point. Walker was now the teaching professional at the Bucks Club. This was the 22nd year of the matches and the record now stood at 17 victories for the PGA, one win for the GAP and four ties.

The Senior PGA Professional National Championship was held in Aldie, Virginia during the second week of October. The tournament was hosted by the Creighton Farms club in Aldie and the River Creek Club in Leesburg. Jim Woodward (78, 70, 66, 73) eagled the par five last hole to win by one stroke with a one under par 287 . Mike Miles finished second at 288. Bob Gaus and Sonny Skinner tied for third with 290s. George Forster tied for 53rd at 305 and won $1,197.50. It took a score of 151 to make the cut. Greg Farrow, Stu Ingraham, Bill Sautter, Cleve Coldwater, Don Allan, Don DeAngelis and Rob Shuey missed the cut. Brian Kelly was entered but did not play in the tournament. Farrow was the first alternate and he got in when Jim Masserio didn’t play. First prize was $20,000 from a purse of $285,000.

The Philadelphia PGA and the New Jersey PGA renewed a challenge match series that had been played for four years from 1995 to 1998. The match was hosted by the Huntingdon Valley Country Club on the third Wednesday of October. There were twelve players on each team and two had to be seniors. They played 18 holes and competed for 18 points. There were 12 singles matches and six better-ball matches. The team of Travis Deibert-Stu Ingraham won 3 points. The teams of Tony R. Perla-Jake Gerney and Terry Hatch-Steve Swartz each won 2-1/2 points. The team of George Forster-Brian Kelly won 2 points. The teams of Joe Kogelman-Eric Kennedy and David Quinn-Barry Dear each won 1 point. Kogelman was and assistant professional at the Indian Valley Country Club and had won the William Hyndman Open at Huntingdon Valley Country Club in 2012. The final result was 12 points for the Philadelphia PGA and 6 points for the New Jersey PGA. This renewal of the matches was called the Turnpike Cup.

The Section Match Play Championship was played at the Little Mill Country Club in the fourth week of October. There were 60 entries so the defending champion and the top three point winners for the 2012 season were given byes to fill out a 64-man match play ladder. The winners played two 18 hole matches each day. There were a number of upsets in the second round of which one was the defending champion, David Quinn. Two senior members of the Section met in one of the semifinal matches as George Forster defeated Brian Kelly by 2&1. In the other semifinal match Terry Hatch prevailed over Dave McNabb on the first extra hole. In the finals Hatch was one up after nine holes. Forster holed a 70 foot uphill birdie putt on the tenth hole to even the match. Forster went 1-up on the 12th hole and when Hatch called a penalty on himself for moving a loose impediment in a greenside bunker on the next hole Forster was two up. Hatch then proceeded to win the 15th and 17th holes to even the match. When Forster won the last hole with a par he was the winner of the Match Play Championship for a second time. First prize was $1,200 from a purse of $6,000.

The PGA Assistant Championship was held at the PGA Golf Club’s Wanamaker Course in the first week of November. It was won by Jake Scott (69-65-67-70) with a 17 under par 271. He finished seven strokes in front of Ryan Vermeer (278). Scott Frost (279) and Scooter Buhrman (279) tied for third. First prize was $9,000. Shawn Matthews tied for 42nd at 296 and won $665. Richie Krebs tied for 53rd at 298 and won $540. Steve Swartz finished in 60th place at 299 and won $500. Nathan Fry and Barry Dear missed the cut. The total purse was $100,000.

In the second week of November the PGA’s national meeting was held in Baltimore at the Hyatt Regency hotel. It was an election year and Ted Bishop was elected president. Derek Sprague moved up from secretary to vice president. Paul Levy defeated six other candidates for secretary on the fourth ballot. Peter Bevacqua was introduced as the new executive director and CEO of the PGA. He was replacing Joe Steranka who had retired. A resolution passed to allow an apprentice up to 12 months to find a new PGA employer after losing their supervising PGA employer. Section president Dan Haskell and vice president John Pillar were the delegates representing the Philadelphia Section. Past national presidents Dick Smith, Sr. and Jack Connelly along with our district director Leo DeGisi were also in attendance. The Section was also represented by its executive director Geoff Surrette.

The Wilmington Country Club hosted the Section’s fall meeting on the third Monday of November. The meeting had been scheduled for the fifth Monday of October but a hurricane named Sandy arrived in the Northeast that day so the meeting was postponed. There were more than 250 members and guests in attendance. Section President Dan Haskell presided over the meeting. The national director, Leo DeGisi, representing District II was in attendance and reported on national affairs. He spoke about the resolutions that passed, failed or were withdrawn at the recent national meeting. He also informed the members on the hiring of a new CEO that would be running the PGA of America. DeGisi mentioned that the PGA of America now had 175 employees. The Section’s Executive Director Geoff Surrette reported on various topics. For 2013 $10,000 had been budgeted for education. The Philadelphia Section is a 501c6 not-for-profit corporation. He stated that there was $711,000 in the Section’s restricted fund. Surrette mentioned that the Section’s lease on its office was nearing the end and that the officers were considering new home sites. During the past golf season the Section had run 60 Junior Tour events with 715 boys and girls having played in at least one event. During the meeting a video on the life of Philadelphia’s Johnny McDermott, a two-time winner of the U.S. Open was played. The video was created by Section historian Pete Trenham and TelRa, a local company. The famous sportscaster Jack Whitaker did the voiceover. The playing awards were also given out for 2013. Stu Ingraham, who was now 52-years-old, swept the honors. He was the Section’s "Player of the Year", the Skee Riegel "Senior Player of the Year" and he won the DeBaufre Trophy with a scoring average of 70.41. He was the "Player of the Year" for a record eighth time and his DeBaufre win was the sixth time. Ronnie Ward was recognized at the meeting by his peers for his more than 60-plus years as a golf professional in the Philadelphia Section. Trenham made the introduction and read from a plaque that was presented to Ward.

At the fall meeting on November 19th two more Section members, George E. McNamara and Edward Matthew Dougherty were inducted into the Philadelphia PGA Hall of Fame.

George McNamara
Section President and
All Around PGA Professional

George McNamara had been a golf professional in the Philadelphia Section for 46 years. He turned pro in 1966 and worked at several clubs in the Section as an assistant. In 1974 he became the head professional at the Downingtown Inn & Country Club. While at Downingtown he hosted the Section’s first four Philadelphia PGA Junior Golf Academys. In 1985 McNamara left the Downingtown course, which didn’t have a practice field, and opened a driving range and miniature golf course for the public across the street. He named it Mac’s Driving Range. He then moved across the state line to Delaware as the professional at the Brandywine Country Club where he stayed for more than 25 years but he continued to operate the driving range in Downingtown for 14 years. On two occasions McNamara and his teaching professional Mike Thompson put on a 24-hour golf instruction marathon to raise money for the Variety Club’s charities. His first involvement with Section politics was as a member of the membership committee. Over a two decade period he held almost every Section office, which included being president for two years in 1998 and 1999. He was a delegate to the national meeting three times. As the treasurer in 1996 he instituted a reserve fund for the Section, which required the Section to put $50,000 into a restricted fund each year for future opportunities. McNamara was always on the cutting edge of the future in golf. He was one of the first golf professionals in the Philadelphia Section to use a computer. In 1988 the Section formed a computer committee and made him the chairman. The committee advised the Section officers and members on the purchase and use of hardware and software. He hosted numerous Section meetings and tournaments, as he was always willing and ready to support the Section’s activities. Along with assisting the Section he was active in raising funds for various charities through golf. He was the Section’s "Merchandiser of the Year" three times. In 1988 McNamara became just the second Section member to become a "Master Professional". The subject of his thesis was "How to Build, Own and Operate a Golf Practice Range and Miniature Golf Course". The next year McNamara was honored as the Philadelphia Section PGA "Professional of the Year.

Ed Dougherty
Won on the PGA Tour
Won on the Senior PGA Tour

Ed Dougherty was a baseball player in his youth but when he returned to Ft. Lewis, Washington after duty on the front lines of the Vietnam War he began playing golf on the facility’s golf course. While fighting the war in Vietnam Dougherty received the Purple Heart and earned two Bronze Stars for valor. After completing his tour of duty in 1969 he returned to his home near Philadelphia. A friend took him to Edgmont Country Club for a round of golf. Tiny Pedone, the golf professional and part owner of Edgmont watched Dougherty hit a few shots and offered him a job picking the range. He worked at Edgmont in the summers and landed a job in the U.S. Virgin Islands for the winters. This allowed him to work on his game 12 months a year. In the Virgin Islands he worked under Mike Reynolds, a pro with Philadelphia connections who had grown up playing at The Springhaven Club. Reynolds taught him some of the finer points of the game. It wasn’t long before Dougherty began winning tournaments in the Philadelphia Section. He won the Section’s assistants’ championship in 1972. Dougherty became a PGA member in the summer of 1974 and began playing the PGA Tour as a Monday qualifier. Because he had just begun to play the PGA Tour he was still eligible for the PGA Club Professional Championship that year. He finished 12th and earned a place in the 1975 PGA Championship where he was third with one round to go and finished 22nd. Later that year he won the Section Championship. For eight years Dougherty played the PGA Tour with some success. When not on the PGA Tour he worked at Edgmont except for one year when he was the head professional at the Cobb’s Creek Golf Club. During the early 1980s he won the Section Championship two more times, a Philadelphia Open and the 1985 PGA Club Professional Championship. In 1985 he was the "PGA Club Professional Player of the Year". Dougherty also won the PGA’s winter program’s match play in 1984 and the stroke play in 1986, which made him the only one to win those two tournaments and the Club Professional Championship. Late in 1986 Dougherty won the Wilson Club Professional Classic which included all of the Section champions and the PGA Cup Team members. In 1983 the PGA Tour devised a "profit sharing plan", which was based on the total number of cuts (top 70 and ties after 36 holes) that a player had made. Realizing that he wasn’t far from having made enough cuts to become vested Dougherty decided to try the PGA Tour again. In the fall of 1986 he regained his PGA Tour card at the Q-School. For ten of the next eleven years he stayed exempt on the PGA Tour. Twice he finished tied for first in tour events only to lose out in a sudden-death playoff. In 1995 he had lost his exemption but he got into the Deposit Guaranty Golf Classic on his past performance and won the tournament. That kept him exempt until he was old enough to play on the Senior PGA Tour. Dougherty played eleven years on the Senior Tour where he won twice. Dougherty played in seven PGA Championships, five U.S. Opens and one Masters Tournament. His best showing in a major came in 1999 when he finished second in the U.S. Senior Open.

Rory McIlroy led the PGA Tour in all phases. He was the PGA Player of the Year, winner of the Vardon Trophy and led the money winnings list. He won the Vardon Trophy with a scoring average of 68.87 while winning $8,047,952 in 17 tournaments. McIlroy won the PGA Championship plus three other events. Jim Furyk finished 18th on the money list with winnings of $3,623,805 in 25 starts. Sean O’Hair was 73rd with earnings of $1,290,981 in 26 tournaments. Jason Bohn played in 28 tournaments winning $795,594, which put him in 117th place and allowed him to have a full exemption on the PGA Tour for another year.

Bernard Langer led the Senior PGA Tour in money won with $2,140,296 in 20 events. Joe Daley got into 15 tournaments and Casey Wittenberg was the leading money winner on the PGA’s second tour with winnings of $433,453 in 24 events.

In late November the USGA and the R&A announced changes to the rules of golf that prohibited anchoring the club to a person’s body for any golf stroke. This mainly concerned those who used long-putters and belly-putters. The rule, which would not go into effect until January 1, 1916, prohibited strokes made with the club or a hand gripping the club held directly against the player’s body, or with a forearm held against the body. Long putters could still be used as long as they were not anchored. Long putters had been around for nearly 30 years but now major championships had been won by players using these putters. In the 2012 Philadelphia Section Championship the top two players, Stu Ingraham and Greg Farrow, used long putters and had been for quite a few years. Three major championships had been won with belly-putters or long-putters in the past two years.

Qualifying for the PGA Tour which was held at PGA West in La Quinta, California concluded on the first Monday of December. The par 72 PGA Stadium and Nicklaus Tournament courses were used for the qualifying. A 25 under par score of 407 for the six rounds led the qualifying. The players with scores of 415 or better qualified as five players tied for 22nd at that number. Vince Covello, who grew up playing golf under the tutelage of Ben Lesniak at the Llanerch Country Club missed by one stroke. Lesniak was now one of the professionals at the Bala Golf Club. Covello posted rounds of 69, 70, 67, 73, 67 and 70 for a 416 total. Even though he had missed securing a place on the PGA Tour he had a full exemption for 2013 on the PGA Tour’s second tour which was now called the Web.com Tour.

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Harry Hammond
Winner of Two
National PGA Awards
2013 - Harry Hammond was the national recipient of the Bill Strausbaugh Award. The ceremony took place in late January during the PGA of America’s Merchandise Show in Orlando. The award was for leadership and service to a PGA Section. The promotion of junior golf had been Hammond’s mission for many years. Four times he had been the Section’s junior golf leader and in 1999 he had been the PGA of America’s “Junior Golf Leader”. During his 50 plus years in the golf business he had cut down thousands of clubs for new junior golfers. He was always available for junior clinics and junior golf tournaments. For 40 years Hammond had run a two-day tournament for the Section. He had won the Bill Strausbaugh Award in the Philadelphia Section in 2009 and he was the Section’s “Golf Professional of the Year” in 1991. 

In late January at the PGA Merchandise Show national President Ted Bishop announced that the PGA of America was officially against the USGA’s recent proposal to ban anchoring of the putter. The PGA  had polled its members and 4,200 of its 27,000 members and apprentices had responded. About 67%  voted in favor of anchoring. In November when the USGA and the R&A had issued the proposal they had said that they would welcome input on the subject from other entities and that the comment period would end on February 28, 2013.

Scott Nye
"Golf Professional of the Year"
Philadelphia PGA 2013

The Philadelphia Section’s spring meeting was held at the Green Valley Country Club on the first Monday of April. The biggest news was that the Section was purchasing an office. It had been leasing office space and the lease was finished at the end of the year. The Section’s “Golf Professional of the Year” was Merion Golf Club professional Scott Nye and he was also merchandiser of the year for private clubs. As the professional at Merion Nye had hosted the 2005 U.S. Amateur, the 2009 Walker Cup and the 1999 U.S. Junior Amateur Championship. He was now in the midst of hosting the U.S. Open. He had been in the Section since 1990, with nine years as the professional at the Country Club of York and fourteen years at Merion. He was the Section’s Horton Smith Award winner in 1996 and 1997. As the professional at Merion he had traveled numerous miles to speak to various golf organizations promoting golf and Merion. There could not be a better ambassador for golf and Merion than Scott Nye. Mark Anderson was the Section’s “Teacher of the Year”. Anderson had been a head professional at three clubs in the Philadelphia Section and was now devoting his full attention to teaching golf at the Philadelphia Cricket Club. At the Cricket Club he came up with an innovative idea called the Breakfast Club where he provided golf instruction from 6:30 a.m. to 8 a.m. He was also the coach of the University of Pennsylvania women’s golf team. Before Anderson began coaching the team they had never won a  tournament. The team was now very competitive and had won the 2010 Ivy League championship along with other tournaments.

The Masters Tournament which had been held at the Augusta National Golf Club during the first full week of April for many years changed its dates to the second full week of April. A tournament which should have been all about the golf and who won will be remembered as the one where Tiger Woods took an illegal  drop and was not disqualified. In the second round Wood’s third shot hit the flagstick on par five 15th hole. The golf ball caromed back into the water hazard. Woods elected to play his next stroke from where he had played the previous shot. That was fine except he played from two steps behind that spot. A spectator put in a telephone call to Augusta National to report the incorrect drop. After the round the Masters’ officials interviewed Woods and allowed him to sign his scorecard without a penalty. They must not have asked the right question as later that evening Woods mentioned in a TV interview that he had dropped a couple of steps behind where he had played his previous shot. On Saturday morning the Masters officials interviewed Woods again. Even though the rules called for disqualification for signing for an incorrect score the Masters officials decided to just penalize him two strokes. After all of that Augusta provided another exciting back nine and a very memorable ending. Adam Scott (69-72-69-69) holed a 25-foot birdie putt on the last hole for a back nine 33 and a clubhouse leading total of 279. Angel Cabrera (71-69-69-70), playing right behind Scott, put his second shot two feet from the hole for a birdie-par-birdie finish and a total of 279. A sudden death playoff was then held on the 18th hole. They halved that hole with pars and then moved on to the 10th hole. Scott proceeded  to hole a 12-foot putt with his long-putter and became the third in the last four major tournaments to win with an anchored long-putter. Jason Day finished third at 281. Tiger Woods and Marc Leishman tied for fourth with 283s. First prize was $1,440,000. Jim Furyk tied for 25th at 290 and won $56,040. The purse totaled $8,000,000. 

New Philadelphia PGA Section Office
Owned by the Section-April 2013
1009 Penllyn Pike, Lower Gwynedd, PA

In the third week of April the Philadelphia Section moved to a new office which it had purchased. It was now an owner instead of a renter. The building had three floors and was large enough for the various offices needed and storage of equipment for the management of its tournaments. The building was 4,100 square feet with 900 square feet of that in the basement for storage. The purchase price was $680,000. $300,000 was taken from the Section’s Reserve Fund and the rest was financed by the Valley Green Bank. The lease at their previous home had been $40,000 a year and the building was deteriorating. The new address was 1009 Penllyn Pike, Lower Gwynedd, PA, 19002. The 215-886-7742 telephone number was still the same as before. The 7742 was also PPGA on the telephone dial.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at the Chambersburg Country Club on the second Thursday of May. Par for the course was usually 73 but the USGA made it a par 72 for the qualifying round. There were three spots to qualify for there and three players ended up tied for the medal at 74. David Hilgers, a mini-tour player from Hershey along with two Maryland amateurs Gary Carpenter, Jr. and David Bosdosh took the three spots.

Waynesborough Country Club hosted local qualifying for the U.S. Open on the second Thursday of May. There were 122 golfers competing for seven spots at Waynesborough. Amateur Oliver White and Texas professional Mikel Martinson tied for low at even par 71. Travis Howe who was playing the mini-tours out of Osceola, Pennsylvania along with amateurs Jeffrey Osberg and Braden Shattuck took the next three places with 72s. Philadelphia Country Club Mark Summerville won the sixth spot with a 73. West Chester mini-tour player Chris Gallagher earned the seventh spot in a seven-man playoff by making a birdie three on the 10th hole, which was the first playoff hole.

On the second Monday of May Whitford Country Club hosted local qualifying for the U.S. Open. There were five spots at Whitford. Reinstated amateur and former Philadelphia Open winner Michael Brown was low with an even par 72. Baltimore amateur Christopher Baloga was next at 73. Reinstated amateur David West and John Ladow, a mini-tour player out of Pottstown, took the third and fourth places with 74s. Connecticut amateur Blake Morris won the last place with a 76.

Applebrook Golf Club hosted the local qualifying for the U.S. Open on the third Thursday of May. There were eight places to qualify for at Applebrook. John Lynch, the teaching professional at the Peninsula Golf & Country Club led the qualifying with a one under par 70. Michael Tobiason,  David Sanders (Mt. Laurel, NJ) and  Brandon Knaub (York) took the next three places with 71s. Joey Bonargo (Mechanicsville, PA) and Zak Drescher (Landisville, PA) along with amateur Cory Siegfried and North Carolina amateur Chad Wilfong won the last four spots in a six-man playoff. Sanders, Knaub, Bonargo and Drescher were playing the professional golf mini-tours. 

The PGA Senior Championship was held at the Bellerive Country Club in St. Louis, Missouri. None of the Philadelphia Section’s club professionals had been able to qualify at the Senior PGA Professional National Championship in October. For the second straight year a real dark-horse won the tournament. Japan’s Kohki Idoki in his first trip to the United States put together rounds of 71, 69, 68 and 65 to come from well behind. His eleven under par 273 total won by two strokes over Kenny Perry (275) and Jay Haas (275). Mark O’Meara finished fourth at 276. Joe Daley, who was fully exempt on he PGA Senior Tour missed the cut and received $1,000. First prize was $378,000.

The two-day Burlington Classic was held at the Burlington Country Club in the first week of June. On Sunday two professionals were paired with three amateurs in a pro-am format. The professionals’ scores counted toward a two-day total. Play on both days was challenged by rain storms. On Monday the start was delayed by 30 minutes. When the 36 holes was finally completed Mark Sheftic (68-68) and Tommy Ellison (68-68) an assistant at the Brandywine Country Club were tied for the top prize with four under par 136s. A sudden death playoff was held on the 18th hole. The two players halved the hole with pars and then played the hole for a second time. They halved with pars again. The third time they played the hole Sheftic holed a birdie putt from the fringe of the green to win. George Forster, Sr. and Billy Stewart, an assistant at Golf Galaxy-Devon, tied for third at 138. First prize was $2,500 from a total purse of $16,800.

Sectional qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at eleven locations around the USA on the first Monday of June. There had also been sectional qualifying in Japan and England at earlier dates. No one from the Philadelphia Section qualified. Jim Furyk was exempt off several categories. One of those was a ten year exemption for winning the tournament in 2003.

The Variety Club Tournament of Champions was scheduled for the second week of June but rain interfered. The tournament was being hosted by the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club. Heavy rain on Friday and more rain on Monday closed a course that in spite of several renovations had always had flooding problems. The pro-am portion of the event on Tuesday was postponed until later in the year and the individual competition was reduced to one round and played on Wednesday. For most of the day a host of players held the lead with one under par 71s. Late in the day Rich Steinmetz came in with a 69 and soon after that John Pillar posted a 70. Stu Ingraham, Dave McNabb, David Quinn, Joe Kogelman,  George Forster, Sr., Barry Dear, Don DeAngelis and Michael Rushin tied for third with 71s. Kogelman was now the teaching professional at the Waynesborough Country Club. First prize was $3,500.

In the second week of June the U.S. Open returned to the Merion Golf Club’s East Course for a fifth time. There were 9,660 entries which was a record. The entries came from 74 different countries. In spite of being lengthened by almost 500 yards to nearly 7,000, Merion’s golf course was thought to be too short and outdated for the current golf technology. The only hope was to have a fast and firm golf course which would send the golf balls bounding off the fairways and greens. That didn’t come about. Before play even began it poured rain on Friday and Monday. When the tournament got under way on Thursday birdies were plentiful but before anyone could finish even nine holes another storm arrived and play was stopped for more than three hours. Later in the day rain and the threat of lightening held up play for another hour. In spite of the soft conditions only two sub-par rounds were posted that day. There were birdies but there were also double bogies and worse. When darkness fell there were 78 players still on the golf course. When the first round was finally completed on Friday morning Phil Mickelson held the lead with a three under par 67. Somehow Merion’s course was holding its own. There were a total of five rounds of under par golf. On day two the first round was completed. Then it was Billy Horschel who stepped to the front with a 67 in the second round. Horschel hit all 18 greens in regulation. Not everyone finished on Friday either as 68 players had to complete their rounds on Saturday morning. At the end of 36 holes Horschel and Mickelson were tied for the lead at 139. The third round began with a two tee start at 12:28. There had been a two tee start for the first two rounds and due to the location of the tenth tee the players who began their rounds on the back nine started on the eleventh hole. Also because of a lack of space the players warmed up on Merion’s East Course. Scoring in the third round was much like the first two. The low round was 67 and six players broke par. Mickelson turned in a 70 to take a one stroke lead into the final round. At 209 he was the only player under par. On Sunday everyone went off the first tee in twos. Once again 67 was the low round and the leaders struggled. Mickelson made two double bogies along with two unlikely bogies on #13 and #15. When it was all over the winner was Justin Rose who put together rounds of 71, 69, 71 and 70 for a one over par 281. Mickelson and Jason Day tied for second at 283. It was the sixth time that Mickelson had finished second in the U.S. Open. Ernie Els, Jason Dufner, Hunter Mahan and Horschel tied for fourth at 285. Jim Furyk missed the cut. First prize was $1,440,000 form a purse of $8,000,000.

Holding another U.S. Open at Merion Golf Club was a logistical nightmare. Without the assistance of Haverford College, the homeowners on Golfhouse Road and Haverford Township it never would have taken place. For the seven days of the tournament Haverford Avenue, Ardmore Avenue, Golfhouse Road and other neighboring streets were closed. The driving range at the East course was used by the USGA for a large merchandise tent, media center, food concessions and other USGA tents. The  players practiced on the West Course. The approach to the first green was flattened for a tee and the players drove balls down the 9th and 10th fairways. The 1st and 18th greens were used for practice pitching. The practice putting green was made five times larger. Tents were put up behind the practice tee on private property for lockers rooms and dining for the players, their families and the caddies. The players and their caddies were then transported to the East Course through back roads. Hospitality tents were erected on the front lawns of the residences on Golfhouse Road. The owners were well paid for this inconvenience and the lawns were all resodded after the tournament. The members were not allowed in the clubhouse for the week but a tent with a deck which overlooked the 13th green and the 1st fairway was provided for them. The members had to park on one of the holes at the West Course and then walk some distance to the shuttle buses. People like USGA staff, USGA officials and the press parked at Villanova University and were bused in. The public and volunteers were provided with parking several miles away at Rose Tree Park near Media and the soccer stadium in Chester. Some businesses provided shuttles. As usual one could take the P&W train to Ardmore Avenue which is right at the golf course. Others could take SEPTA trains to the Rosemont Station and shuttle buses then took you to a gate on Haverford. A short walk from there took them to a bridge that had been constructed over the railroad tracks just for the tournament. That put you in the club’s parking lot near the 18th hole. Without the cooperation of many entities the tournament could never been held. The USGA paid for all of these temporary structures.  

George Forster, Sr. qualified for the U.S. Senior Open in Maryland on the third Wednesday of June. Qualifying was hosted by the 6,825 yard Musket Ridge Country Club in Myersville. Virginia amateur Michael Sughrue led with six under par 66. Western Pennsylvania amateur Sean Knapp was next at 69. Forster posted a 70 and went on to win the third and last spot in a three-way sudden death playoff that took seven holes to decide. On the seventh extra hole Forster holed an eight-foot putt for a birdie to put an end to the playoff. One of the other participants in the playoff was Rob Shuey.

The PGA Professional National Championship was held at the Crosswater Club in Sunriver, Oregon during the fourth week of June. This was also the qualifying event for the PGA Championship. There were thirteen players in the field from the Philadelphia Section. Rod Perry, a left-handed player from the North Florida Section, was the winner by three strokes. Perry posted rounds of 63, 72, 73 and 69 for an eleven under par 277. Ryan Polzin finished second at 280 and Jeff Sorenson was third at 282. Mark Sheftic, Mike Small, Chip Sullivan and J.C. Anderson tied for fourth with 283 totals. Sheftic won $22,237.50. Dave McNabb also made the cut and finished in a tie for 9th at 286 winning $12,100. By finishing in the top 20 Sheftic and McNabb qualified for the PGA Championship. Stu Ingraham missed the cut by one stroke with a 146. Also missing the cut were  Rich Steinmetz, John Bierkan, Jake Gerney, Eric Kennedy, Travis Deibert, Matthew McKeon, Rob Shuey, Terry Hatch, Rich Hughart, Alex Knoll and Barry Dear. Brian Kelly and Greg Farrow chose not to play and the Section was also awarded one extra spot. Out of that Knoll and Sheftic took their places and when Cleve Coldwater the third alternate could not play Shuey got into the starting field. Deibert was now the head professional at the Commonwealth National Golf Club.  McKeon, who was the new professional at the Great Bear Golf & Country Club, had qualified in the New Jersey Section. Two golf courses at Crosswater were used for the tournament and one was quite a bit easier than the other. Par at both courses was 72. The championship course which was used for three rounds measured 7,489 yards. First prize was $75,000.

In early July the PGA of America and the PGA Tour agreed to accept the USGA’s ban on what it referred to as “Attached Putting”. The rule would take affect on January 1, 2016.

The U.S. Senior Open was held at the Omaha  Country Club in Omaha, Nebraska during the second week of July. Kenny Perry posted rounds of 64 and 63 on the weekend to win the tournament by five strokes after trailing by ten shots at the halfway point. Perry had begun with a 67 and a 73 in the first two rounds. His 267 total was thirteen under par. Fred Funk finished second at 272. Rocky Mediate and Corey Pavin tied for third with 273 totals. First prize was $500,000. Joe Daley who was fully exempt on the PGA Senior Tour tied for 20th at 281 and won $33,779. George Forster, Sr. also made the cut and tied for 50th. He put together a 288 and won $8,156.

On the third Wednesday of July Waynesborough Country Club hosted the Philadelphia Open. There were 78 players, 32 professionals and 46 amateurs, in the starting field. Some had been exempt and others were there through qualifying events. Once again it was one day and 36 holes of walking with caddies. It was hot and humid with temperatures in the low 90s. The course measured just under 7,000 yards. At the end of 27 holes Brandon Matthews led the field  at four under par but he proceeded to make a few bogies and came to the last hole needing a birdie to tie  Billy Stewart (69-71). Having begun his final round on the back nine he was finishing on the 446-yard ninth hole. Matthews (70-70) played a 128-yard sand wedge to the green and holed a ten-foot putt to tie Stewart at 140. A four hole playoff was held on holes  six through nine. Matthews played the four holes in one under par to win by two strokes. He one-putted all four holes for a total score of 15 against 17 for Stewart.  The Philadelphia Open had now been won by amateurs for a fourth straight year. Amateurs Michael McDermott and Chip Lutz tied for third at 141. Rich Steinmetz and Mark Summerville tied for fifth with 142s. First prize was $7,000 from a purse of $35,000. Seventeen professionals won money.

The British Open was played during the third week of July at the Muirfield golf club in Gullane, Scotland. Phil Mickelson teed off in the final round trailing the leader by five strokes. Four birdies in the last six holes gave him a 66 and his first British Open victory. Mickelson (69-74-72-66) was the only player to finish under par for the tournament as he finished at three under par 281. Henrik Stenson was second at 284. Ian Poulter, Adam Scott and Lee Westwood tied for third with 285 totals. Jim Furyk missed the cut. First prize was $1,442,826 in United States dollars.

Don Allan who was now the teaching professional at the Burlington Country Club won the GALV Lehigh Valley Open on the fifth Tuesday of July. The two-day tournament was hosted by the Northampton Country Club which measured 6,600 yards. Allan, who had won this tournament in 2010, finished his second round with three straight birdies to win by two strokes. He put together rounds of 69 and 67 for an eight under par 136. Stu Ingraham and Rolling Green Golf Club assistant Michael Little tied for second at 138. Mike Moses, Greg Farrow and Terry Hertzog tied for fourth with 140s. First prize was $2,250.

The 36-hole Philadelphia PGA Assistant Championship was played at the Cedarbrook Country Club on the first Monday of August. This was the qualifying event for the PGA of America Assistant Championship. Alex Knoll  put together rounds of 68 and 70 for a six under par 138 which was just what he needed to win. Tony R. Perla and Aronimink Golf Club assistant Carson Solien tied for second at 139. Merion Golf Club assistant William Ciccotti and Mark Summerville tied for fourth at 140. There were five spots to qualify for in the national championship so those five were going to be representing the Philadelphia Section. First prize was $1,350. Steve Swartz was alone in sixth place with a 141 and that made him the first alternate. When Knoll could not play in the tournament Swartz got into the national championship. 

In the second week of August Stu Ingraham won the Philadelphia Section Senior Championship for a third straight year. The two-day tournament was hosted by the Saucon Valley Country Club on its Weyhill Course in the first week of August. Ingraham (140) posted a pair of two under par 70 rounds to win by two strokes. First prize was $1,200. The tournament was also qualifying for the PGA’s national senior championship for club professionals. Based on the number of entries from the Section Philadelphia had been awarded nine spots. Bill Sautter, Brian Kelly and George Forster, Sr. tied for second with 142s. Rob Shuey (143) and Greg Farrow (143) picked up the fifth and sixth spots. Don Allan (144) was seventh and Manufacturers Golf & Country Club professional Bob Fritz (146) was eighth. Philmont Country Club professional Mickey Sokalski (147) won a sudden death playoff over three others for the ninth and last place.

The PGA Championship was played in second week of August. at the Oak Hill Country Club’s East Course near Rochester, New York. Since the hosting of the Ryder Cup in 1995 the course had been lengthened a little and now measured 7,163 yards. The first two days it rained enough to soften the course and birdies were plentiful. Philadelphia Section members Dave McNabb and Mark Sheftic were in the field having qualified at the PGA Professional National Championship in June. Jim Furyk played well for four days but Jason Duffner played even better as he put together rounds of 68, 63, 71 and 68. Furyk led the field with one round to play and Duffer trailed by one stroke. The two of them were paired together for the last round and they battled it out. Both players made bogey fives on the final two holes which measured a total of 1,000 yards. When it was over Duffner’s ten under par 270 was two strokes less than Furyk’s 272. Henrik Stenson finished third at 273 and Jonas Blixt was fourth at 274. There were some low scores on the last day but no one really challenged Duffner and Furyk. McNabb and Sheftic along with the other 18 club professionals missed the cut. First prize was $1,445,000 from a purse of $8,000,000. Duffner’s 63 on Friday tied the lowest score ever shot in a major championship.

Andrew Mason, a member at Huntingdon Valley Country and now a professional playing mini-tours won the Pennsylvania Open in the second week of August. The three-day tournament was hosted by the 7,084-yard Commonwealth National Golf Club. On Tuesday the second day of play was rained out and the field was cut to the low 40 and ties from round one. The players that made the cut played 36 holes on Wednesday. Mason put together rounds of 68, 72 and 72 for a one under par 212 total. He led by four strokes with nine holes to play but a few bogies on the last nine left him needing a par on his last hole to win, which was #9. He missed the green but chipped to within two-feet and holed the putt for the victory. As an amateur Mason had won both the Philadelphia Open and the Pennsylvania Amateur Championship in 2011 and 2012. Western Pennsylvania’s John Popeck finished second at 213. Travis Howe was third with a 214 total. George Forster, Sr., Gordon Vietmeier, Daniel Obremski and amateur Greg Podufal tied for fourth with 216 totals. First prize was $8,000.

In the third week of August the two-day Pro-Am for Wishes was played at the Penn Oaks Golf Club. David Quinn came to the par four 18th hole needing a birdie to have any chance of winning. His tee shot was off to the right in trees and his second shot was well over the green . From there Quinn played a flop shot with a lob-wedge that landed on the collar of the green and trickled into the cup. That put him in the clubhouse at four under par 138. When the first round leaders faltered Quinn  (69-69) was the winner by one stroke. Mark Sheftic and Billy Stewart tied for second with 139 totals. John Appleget, Eric Kennedy and Mark Summerville tied for fourth at 141. Quinn took home a check for $2,700. For Sunday’s first round each professional was paired with two amateurs in a pro-am format to raise money for charity and the professional’s score counted toward a two-day score for individual prize money.

On the first Tuesday of September the Drexel Morgan & Co. Classic (formerly the Haverford Trust Classic) was played at the 6,900-yard Sunnybrook Golf Club. The tournament with a first prize of $75,000 was again sponsored by George Connell. The tournament had been scheduled on its usual date, the Tuesday after Memorial Day, but heavy rain brought about a postponement to the day after Labor Day. The field was composed of 129 professionals and 12 invited amateurs. Some of the professionals were exempt and the others had qualified earlier. At the end of the day four professionals; Billy Stewart, Stu Ingraham, Bill Sautter and Pottstown’s Brookside Country Club professional Ryan Breidegam, were tied for the top spot with four under par 68s. At one point in the round Sautter was seven under par. A sudden-death playoff was held on the  par four 18th hole. Briedegam was the only one that wasn’t on the green in regulation. He proceeded to almost hole out his chip shot as it caught the lip of the cup and stopped within inches of the hole. Ingraham and Sautter then putted for birdies and both failed to reach the hole. It then came down to Stewart who holed his 12-foot putt for the largest first place prize in the Section. Ingraham, Sautter and Briedegam each won $2,733.33 as the next three money prizes were divided among them. The prize money was top-heavy as second prize had been $5,000.

On Friday September 13th Jim Furyk shot a 12-under-par 59 during the BMW Championship at the Conway Farms Golf Club in Lake Forest, Illinois. He was the sixth player to post a 59 on the PGA Tour. Furyk didn’t win the tournament but he did finish solo third. He played the back nine first, putting together an eight-under-par 28 which was helped by a nine-iron shot that he holed out for an eagle 2 on the 334-yard 15th hole. Furyk then played the front nine in 31. A birdie three on the last hole put the finishing touch on a historic round. The round was marred slightly by a three-putt bogey on the fifth hole. The course was playing difficult with a north wind of 20 miles and hour. The next best score that day was a 65.

David Quinn
2013 Section Champion
William B. Packer Trophy

The $70,000 Philadelphia Section Championship took place for the 92nd time in the third week of September. The first two rounds of the tournament were hosted by the White Manor Country Club and the Radnor Valley Country Club. On Tuesday half of the field was playing on each course and on Wednesday they swapped courses. At the end of 36 holes the field was cut to the low 60 and ties. All scores of 155 and under made the cut. David Quinn, Section champion in 2006, got off to a good start with a two under par 69 at White Manor which put him in a tie for the lead. A one over par 71 at Radnor Valley on Wednesday left him three shots in front of the field at 140. On Thursday Quinn put together a steady 73. His one over par 213 won the championship and a $7,500 check by two strokes. Quinn had putted with a long-putter for more than 15 years but he won putting with a regular length putter. Quinn’s name was added to the William B. Packer trophy which had been resurrected. The trophy had been donated in the 1980s by Mr. Packer a member of several clubs and a benefactor to the Philadelphia Section for many years. In the last round Riverton Country Club teaching professional Bill Walker and John Bierkan made a run at Quinn. Walker shot a 67, which was the lowest round of the tournament at White Manor. Bierkan had a chance but made a bogie on the last hole. Walker and Bierkan ended up tied for second at 215. Terry Hertzog, who was now the teaching professional at the Country Club of York had to call a one-stroke penalty on himself in the last round when his ball moved slightly in the heavy rough just off the 10th green. Hertzog finished fourth at 218. The tournament was also the qualifying event for the PGA Professional National Championship. Mark Sheftic and Dave McNabb were exempt off their finish in the national championship held in June. Sheftic was in England playing in the PGA Cup Matches and McNabb (220) tied for seventh in the Section Championship. The first four qualifying spots went to Quinn, Walker, Bierkan and Hertzog. The fifth and sixth spots went to John Appleget (219) and Alex Knoll (219) who posted 219s. The next two spots were won by George Forster, Sr. (220) and Radley Run assistant professional Shawn Hall (220). The ninth, tenth and eleventh spots went to John Lynch (221), Aronimink Golf Club assistant Patrick Clark (221) and Stonewall head professional Ryan Lagergren. (221). The host professionals were White Manor’s Mark Levine and Radnor Valley’s George Forster, Sr.

Mark Sheftic wasn’t entered in the Philadelphia Section Championship because he was playing in the Cup matches against the Great Britain & Ireland PGA just one day after the Section Championship ended. The venue was the Hunting Course at Staley Hall in Northumberland, England. Sheftic, who was participating in the matches for a third time, was one of ten club professionals representing the PGA of America. On Friday and Saturday there were four foursome matches (alternate strokes) in the morning and four four-ball matches in the afternoon. On Sunday all ten players took part in the singles matches. After two days of partners matches the United States led by 10-1/2 points to 5-1/2 points. On Sunday the GB&I team stormed back winning 7-1/2 points. The competition ended in a tie with 13 points for each team. It was not what the U.S. team had gone to England for but they did get to keep the cup due to having won the previous match in 2011. Sheftic won 2 points and lost 2 points

On the second Wednesday of October the challenge match between the Philadelphia PGA and the GAP was played at the Applebrook Golf Club. For just the second time in the 23 history of the matches the Philadelphia Section came out on the short end of the result. One reason may be that several of the Section’s best players were in Virginia playing in the Senior Professional National Championship. There were 12 players on each team and two of the players had to be seniors. The players played 18 holes and were paired in fours. In each pairing there were two singles matches and a four-ball match. The Eric Kennedy-Dave McNabb team won all three points and the Michael Little-Mark Summerville team won two points. The Terry Hertzog-John Bierkan team and the senior team of Mike Moses-John Allen each won one point. The Bill Walker-Barry Dear team and the Rich Steinmetz-John Appleget team each won one-half point. The final tally was 10 points for the GAP team and 8 points for the PGA. The standings for the matches now stood at 17 wins for the PGA against two loses and four ties.

The Senior Professional National Championship was scheduled for the second week of October in Aldie, Virginia but rain changed everything. After two days of trying to outwait the weather the tournament was postponed until April 2014 and moved to the PGA Golf Club in Port St. Lucie, Florida. A few holes were played by some of the contestants but no rounds were completed. There were ten players in the starting field from the Philadelphia Section.

The Philadelphia PGA defeated the New Jersey PGA in a challenge match on the third Thursday of October. The match, called the Turnpike Cup, was in its second year.  It was hosted by the Plainfield Country Club in Edison, New Jersey. There were twelve players on each team and two had to be seniors. The players were paired in fours with two members of each team playing a four-ball match against the other team. In each pairing their were two singles matches being played at the same time. There were three points being contested in each pairing. The senior team of Stu Ingraham-Greg Farrow won all 3 of their possible points. The Mark Summerville/John Bierkan team won 2-1/2 points. The Graham Dendler/Michael Little team won 2 points. The John Appleget/Billy Stewart team won 1-1/2 points. The John Pillar/Mark Sheftic team won 1 point and the Bill Walker/Joe Kogelman team won 1/2 point. The final tally was 10-1/2 points for the Philadelphia team against 7-1/2 points for the New Jersey team. The Philadelphia team had now won for the second straight year in what was a renewal of an earlier series of matches between the two PGA Sections.

Terry Hatch won the Philadelphia Section Match Play Championship at the Little Mill Country Club in the fourth week of October. The Little Mill and Devil’s Glen nines were used at Little Mill. Hatch had lost in the final match the year before to George Forster, Sr. and Forster was his opponent again. This time Hatch was victorious by the count of 3&2. Twice in the final match on Wednesday afternoon Hatch was two-up and both times Forster evened the match. On the back nine Hatch won three straight holes to go three-up and then lost a  hole, but when Hatch birdied the par five 16th hole he was the winner. First prize was $1,200. In the semifinal round on On Wednesday morning Hatch had defeated Dave McNabb 3&2 while Forster was eliminating Billy Stewart by 2&1. There were 64 in the starting field on Monday morning. In order to reach the finals a player had to win five matches and play as much as 36 holes or more each day.

John Pillar
Section President 2013

The annual meeting of the Philadelphia Section PGA was held at the Valley Forge Resort and Casino on the fourth Monday of October. It was an election year. Dan Haskell moved to honorary president after holding office for eight years, the last two as president. After seven years of serving the Section by holding three different offices John Pillar was elected president. Ian Dalzell moved up from secretary to vice president and John Rogers was elected to the office of secretary. After serving as the director of tournaments for seven years during two separate periods Mike Moses stepped down. Dave McNabb was elected director of tournaments and elected to the office of director of section affairs. Leo DeGisi, who was in his sixth year as the Section’s national vice president reported on the affairs of the national association. The financial status of the Section remained strong. Even after the purchase of an office building in April there was still $449,126 in the Restricted Fund. $200,000 was in CDs at the Valley Green Bank which allowed the Section to have a five year fixed mortgage rate of 5.24%. The Section’s Junior Tour had held 62 events which was more than any other year and 810 juniors registered for the program which was 102 more than 2012. The Section started an Elite Junior Tour of fourteen 36-hole events that offered national rankings. The college division had 50 members. David Quinn was the Section’s “Player of the Year” for a second time and he won the DeBaufre trophy for the third time with a 70.0 scoring average. Stu Ingraham finished the season as the Skee Riegel “Senior Player of the Year” for the seventh time.

Clarence W. Hackney
Philadelphia PGA Hall of Fame
2013

Clarence W. Hackney was inducted into the Philadelphia PGA Hall of Fame at the Section’s fall meeting on the fourth Monday of October. Hackney was born in Carnoustie, Scotland in 1894 and learned to play golf there as a caddy. He immigrated to the United States and was an assistant to Johnny McDermott at the Atlantic City Country Club in 1914 when McDermott suffered a mental breakdown. Hackney was promoted to head professional and held the position until his death in 1941. He won the Canadian Open in 1923 and finished second in the Western Open in 1920. In 1921 Hackney was a member of a pre Ryder Cup Team that was defeated by a British team the week before the British Open was played. Hackney won two Philadelphia Section Championships, the Philadelphia Open three times and the New Jersey Open three consecutive years. In 1923 one week before winning the Canadian Open he won the Philadelphia Open at Pine Valley Golf Club by 13 strokes with a score of 298. These victories were rated as PGA Tour victories based on the caliber of the players in the field. Hackney played in 14 U.S. Opens and 11 PGA Championships. He also served the Section as first vice president and tournament chairman for two years and the second vice president for one year. Five times Hackney was a delegate to the PGA of America’s annual meeting from the Philadelphia Section.

The PGA Assistant National Championship was held during the first week of November at the PGA Golf Club in Port St Lucie, Florida. The tournament was played on the Wanamaker Course. There were five assistants from the Philadelphia Section in the starting field. For a third time Frank Bensel won the tournament and this time he won going away with rounds of 69, 74, 66 and 69 for a ten under par 278. Charles Frost finished second at 284. Jeff Seavey and Ray Franz, Jr. tied for third with 286s. First prize was $9,000. Carson Solien finished in 50th place at 301 and won $600. Mark Summerville posted a 308 to finish 66th and won $440. William Ciccotti, Tony R. Perla and Steve Swartz missed the cut. Swartz was in the field as an alternate for Alex Knoll who had qualified as the Section’s assistant champion.

For the first time the PGA Tour ended its season in September right after the Tour Championship. Tiger Woods led the PGA Tour with earnings of $8,703,439 in the 18 tournaments he entered. Woods was also the PGA of America “Player of the Year” for the eleventh time and he won the Vardon Trophy for the ninth time. He captured the Vardon Trophy with a scoring average of 68.98. Jim Furyk finished 15th on the money list with $3,204,779 in 22 events. Jason Bohn played in 23 events and won $739,030 which was good for 111th place. Sean O’Hair had a down year with earnings of $268,614 in 22 tournaments. That left him in 185th place and off the exempt list for 2013.

As a result of having finished outside the top 125 on the PGA Tour money list Sean O’Hair had to play in the PGA Tour qualifying which consisted of four tournaments. Players on the PGA Tour from  number 126 to 200 could enter along with the top 75 from what was now the Web.com, or Developmental Tour. The top 25 from the Web.com Tour had already earned PGA Tour cards for 2014 but they could enter in order to improve their positions. The top 25 money winners in these four events that had not earned cards on the Web.com Tour would also earn PGA Tour cards. O’Hair then proceeded to win $59,333 in those events to retain his PGA Tour exemption and 14th place outside the 125 fully exempt players. This made him eligible for most of the tournaments on the PGA Tour but not all.

       Bernhard Langer led the PGA Senior Tour money list with $2,448,428 in 24 tournaments. Joe Daley ended up in 50th place with $310,774 in 25 events which meant that he had lost his exemption for 2014. Jay Sigel played in two tournaments and won $9,025.

       Chesson Hadley led the PGA Tour’s Developmental Tour which was now called the Web.com tour money list with $535,432 in 22 starts. Sean O’Hair won $59,333 in four events. Those were the four post-season tournaments that allowed O’Hair to retain his PGA Tour privileges. Vince Covello won $21,143 in 18 tournaments which put him in 170th place on the money list.

       The PGA national meeting was held in San Diego, California during the fourth week of November at the Sheraton San Diego Hotel and Marino. Due to not being an election year it was a quiet session. The keynote speakers were Lee Trevino and former New York mayor Rudy Giuliani. Trevino was honored with the 2013 PGA Distinguished Service Award. One resolution was passed and one failed. The one that passed made it possible for PGA Apprentices in all levels to earn credits as a teaching professional at a PGA Recognized Indoor Facility in all levels of apprenticeship while working under a Class A-14 PGA professional. Before that only Level 2 and 3 apprentices could earn credits in that way. Leo DeGisi stepped down as a national director after serving a second three-year term. DeGisi topped Huntingdon Valley Country Club’s Jack Hobens who served as a national vice president for four years (1920-1923). What was then called national vice president was later changed to national director. Section president John Pillar and vice president Ian Dalzell were the delegates representing the Philadelphia Section. Past national presidents Dick Smith, Sr. and Jack Connelly along with our executive director Geoff Surrette were also in attendance. 

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Lou Guzzi
PGA of America
2013 Teacher of the Year
2014 - In late January at the PGA Merchandise Show two Philadelphia Section members were honored with national awards for 2013. Lou Guzzi was the "PGA Teacher of the Year" and Rick Kline was the "PGA Merchandiser of the Year" for public facilities.

Lou Guzzi came to the game of golf as a professional a little later than most. He took a couple of lessons from Jerry Pisano who was leasing Flourtown Country Club and had been one of the Section’s leading players in the 1960s. Not long after that he won the Flourtown club championship. At age 29 he turned pro and became the head professional at Flourtown. In 2001, after ten years at Flourtown he opened a teaching facility in Ft. Washington where he began honing his teaching skills. Guzzi became the director of instruction at Talamore Country Club in 2005 . He and the owner designed a state-of-the-art year-round teaching facility for the practice area. It contained a fireplace, cappuccino bar and office along with the usual driving bays. Along with being a great instructor Guzzi had the ability to make golf fun and interesting for his students. He had been the Philadelphia Section’s "Teacher of the Year" twice.

Rick Kline began his golf career during his college days in 1983 cleaning golf carts and clubs at Seaview Country Club. From that he worked his way up to golf shop manager and then head professional. In 1993 he got an opportunity

Rick Kline
Merchandiser of the Year
Public Facilities-2013
to purchase Sittler Golf Center in Kutztown, which was near his hometown. The facility had no golf shop and was only open from Memorial Day to Labor Day. Soon after taking over the facility Kline made it the place for golfers to get fitted with the right golf equipment. Over time he acquired nearly every golf company’s fitting system. He built a 2,500 square-foot golf shop, a 1,500 square-foot indoor coaching/fitting lab and a snack bar. His driving range was named to the top 50 golf ranges in America by Golf Range Magazine and Golf Digest listed him as one of America’s 100 Best Club Fitters.

The Masters Tournament was held at the Augusta National Golf Club in the second week of April. For the second time in three years the winner was Bubba Watson. A 69 on Thursday was good for second place and on Friday he made five straight birdies on the back nine for a 68. His 137 total led by three shots. On Saturday he posted a 74 and let the contenders back into the chase. Jonas Blixt and Jordan Spieth were tied with him for the lead. On Sunday the usual back nine fireworks did not happen. Watson trailed Spieth by two strokes on the eighth tee but bogies on the next two holes by Spieth and birdies by Watson put the winner in front by two strokes. None of the other contestants were able to made a move on the back nine while Watson was posting a 69. His eight under par 280 was three strokes better than Blixt (283) and Spieth (283). Fifty year old Miguel Angel Jimenez finished fourth 284. First prize was $1,620,000. Jim Furyk tied for 14th at 289 and won $148,500.

The Section held its spring meeting on the second Monday of April at the DuPont Country Club. Section president John Pillar presided over the meeting. Clark Luis opened the meeting by singing the National Anthem. The keynote speaker was Sandy Jones, the CEO and Executive Director of the Great Britain and Ireland PGA. The Section’s Executive Director announced that the ADP funding from the PGA of America was being increased from $90.000 a year to $150,000. The funding would also be increasing by five percent a year through 2019. The PGA of America’s new TV contract had made this possible. There was now $476,859in the Section’s Reserve Fund. The Section’s recent national award winners, Lou Guzzi and Rick Kline were

Dave McNabb
Golf Professional of the Year
Philadelphia Section-2014
recognized. The Section’s "Golf Professional of the Year" was Dave McNabb and the "Teacher of the Year" was Ted Sheftic. McNabb was an excellent example of a well rounded golf professional. He began his career as an assistant at the Cavaliers Country Club in 1993 and became the head professional in 1997. In 2010 he moved north to take over the head professional position at the Applebrook Country Club. McNabb had served the Section on the Junior Golf Committee, Tournament Committee and the Special Awards Committee. He had been a District Director for six years and he was now Director of Tournaments. He was an outstanding player having won more than 20 tournaments in the Philadelphia Section. In 2013 he qualified for the PGA Championship at Oak Hill Country Club in Rochester. Sheftic was the Section’s "Teacher of the Year" for a fourth time had been one of the regions leading instructors for 40 years. He began his professional career as the head professional at the Red Lion Country Club in 1964 and moved to the Hanover Country Club in 1970. In 1999 he relinquished his head pro duties to become a full time instructor. In the last 15 years he had turned out some outstanding players. Many were young women. He was recognized on a national level as a top 100 teacher and a finalist for the PGA of America "Teacher of the Year" award for 2014. His golf school was now located at the Bridges Golf Club.

In the third week of April the 2013 Senior PGA Professional National Championship was held at the PGA Golf Club in Port St. Lucie, Florida. The tournament was scheduled for the second week of October 2013 but after several days of rain it was postponed for six months and moved to one of the PGA’s golf courses in Florida. This was also qualifying for the PGA Senior Championship. Gene Fieger, a former Philadelphia Section member and Section champion won with ease. He put together four rounds in the 60s (68, 69, 69, 69) for a 13 under par score of 275 on the Wanamaker Course. First prize was $20,000. Don Berry finished six strokes back in second place at 282. Jeff Coston, Steve Parker and Frank Esposito tied for second with 283 totals. George Forster tied for 36th at 292, one stroke out of qualifying for the PGA Senior Championship. He was in a five-way playoff for an alternate spot and ended up winning the third one. Forster won $1,850. Stu Ingraham tied for 41st at 293 and won $1,575. Rob Shuey who was now the teaching professional at the Colonial Country Club finished tied for 47th with a 293 and won $1,301.66. Bill Sautter finished in a tie for 53rd at 295 and won $1,190. Don Allan tied for 58th at 296 and won $1,093.33. Mickey Sokalski, Brian Kelly, Don DeAngelis and Bob Fritz missed the cut. The total purse was $285,000.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held on the first Monday of May at the Hidden Creek Golf Club. There were six places to qualify for there. Five of the spots were won by amateurs. Columbian professional Jose Garrido and amateur Alexander Hicks from Cape May Court House tied for the medal with one under par 70s. Michael Johnson was third at 71. James Braunsberg, Michael Kania and Matthew Bassler posted 73s and earned the last three spots. They had to win a five-man playoff.

On the second Thursday of May local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at the Huntsville Golf Club. There were four spots to qualify for at Huntsville. Canadian professional David Sherman was the medalist with an even par 72. Huntingdon Valley’s Andrew Mason took the second spot with a 73. Sean Szerencsits, an assistant at the Southmoore Golf Club and amateur Zachary Herr posted 74s and won the last two spots in a three-man playoff.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at the Laurel Creek Country Club on the second Tuesday of May. There were six spots to qualify for at Laurel Creek. Llanerch’s Vince Covello, who was back playing the professional golf minitours won the medal with a two under par 69. Amateur Mark Hill took the second spot with a 70. Trenton Country Club assistant Brian Hollins, mini-tour professionals Michael Tobiason and Avondale’s Justin Martinson along with north Jersey professional Rex Riley all turned in 71s and took the last four places without the need of a playoff.

Blue Ridge Country Club hosted local qualifying for the U.S. Open on the second Wednesday of May. There were four spots to qualify for. Canadian professional Sean Bozuk was low with a six under par 66. Virginia amateur Justin Young was next with a 69. Pennsylvania amateurs Thomas Timby, Jr. and J.D. Daniels posted 71s and won the last two spots without the need of a playoff.

In the fourth week of May the Senior PGA Championship was held at the Golf Club at Harbor Shores in Benton Harbor, Michigan. The winner was not a surprise but long over due. Colin Montgomerie opened up with a pair 69s which put him in a tie for the lead. A third round 68 put him one stroke in front of the field. In the last round on Sunday Tom Watson made a run with a 65 but Montgomerie wasn’t to be denied as he also posted a 65. His thirteen under par 271 won by four shots. Tom Watson finished second at 275. Bernard Langer and Jay Haas tied for third at 277. Joe Daley tied for 39th at 288 and won $7,666.66. George Forster, Sr. was the third alternate from the 2013 Senior PGA Professional National Championship. He received a call late Sunday night that he was in the tournament. He missed the cut and received $1,000. The total purse was $2,000,000 and Montgomerie won $378,000.

The Haverford Trust Classic was played at the Sunnybrook Golf Club on the fourth Tuesday of May. First prize was again $75,000 for the one day event. There were 144 entries. Rusty Harbold played early and posted a five under par 67 which no one was able to equal. He made seven birdies and two bogies. The field went off in two front nine-back nine waves. Brian Kelly played in the morning as well and posted a 68 which held up for a second place finish and a $5,000 check. Late in the day a thunder storm put an end to golf for that day with 29 players still on the course. The only one of those that had any remote chance to win was Terry Hertzog, who was one under par with three holes to play. Hertzog and the others that had a chance to finish in the money returned to the course the next morning and completed their rounds. Hertzog (69) played his last two holes in two under par and finished in a tie with Dave McNabb (69) for third. Stu Ingraham, John Lynch and Steve Swartz tied for fourth with 70s. Swartz was now the teaching professional at the Conestoga Country Club.

On the first Monday of June sectional qualifying was held for the U.S. Open. No one from the Philadelphia Section made it to the U.S. Open.

John Appleget won the Burlington Classic at the Burlington Country Club on the first Monday of June. The two-day tournament was a pro-am on Sunday which featured five-man teams composed of two professionals and three amateurs. The professionals’ scores counted toward a two-day total. Billy Stewart, who was now an assistant at the Ace Club led the first day with a five under par 65. The second day the tees were moved back and the scores were much higher. There were two 69s and the rest were higher. One of the 69s was posted by Appleget which along with his opening round 67 put him in the clubhouse at 136. Stewart had fallen back a bit but he holed a long birdie putt on the 18th hole to tie Appleget at 136. The two players returned to the 18th tee for a sudden death playoff. Stewart missed the green with his second shot and made a bogie while Appleget was making a routine two-putt par. Barry Dear, Stu Ingraham, George Forster, Sr. and John Allen tied for third with 138 totals. Dear was now the teaching professional at the Twisted Dune Golf Club and Allen was now working for the Taylor Made Golf Company. First prize was $2,500 from a total purse of $20,000.

Martin Kaymer won the U.S. Open in mid June as he went wire-to-wire and won by eight strokes. Kaymer posted rounds of 65, 65, 72 and 69 for a nine under par 271. The tournament was held in Pinehurst, North Carolina on Pinehurst Country Club’s No. 2 course. The course was hosting the U.S. Open for a third time but this was a totally different No. 2 course. Forty acres of Bermuda rough had been removed and replaced with sand and native vegetation. Several hundred sprinkler heads had been removed with only a single center row on each fairway remaining. There may have been more brown grass than green. Erik Compton and Ricky Fowler tied for second at 279. Keegan Bradley, Jason Day, Justin Johnson, Henrik Stenson and Brooks Koepka tied for fourth with 281 totals. Jim Furyk tied for 12th at 283 and won $156,679. First prize was $1,622,000.

On the third Thursday of June qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open was held at the Back Creek Golf Club. There were two spots available. New York’s Jerry Courville and Virginia amateur Roger Newsom qualified by making it through a four-man playoff. The four players had posted one under par 70s. John DiMarco was also in the playoff and ended up as the first alternate. DiMarco later make it into the starting field.

The PGA Professional National Championship was played in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina in the fourth week of June. The tournament was hosted by The Dunes Golf & Beach Club and The Resort Club at Grande Dunes. The first two rounds were played on both courses and then the field was cut to the low 90 and ties. The field was cut again to the low 70 after the third round. The tournament was won by Michael Block (73-69-72-72) with a two under par 286. Block had tied with Jamie Broce (286) and won with a birdie three on the second hole of a sudden death playoff. First prize was $75,000. Stuart Deane finished third at 287 and Frank Esposito was fourth at 288. Dave McNabb holed a 20-foot putt for a birdie three on the 72nd hole and tied for 12th at 292. McNabb qualified for the PGA Championship by being in the top 20. The players with 293 totals played off for the last spots. David Quinn tied for 61st at 300 and won $1,975. Alex Knoll posted a 304 total and finished 75th, winning $1,662.50. Mark Sheftic and George Forster, Sr. made the 90-man cut and missed the third round cut. John Appleget, Brendon Post, Bill Walker, Patrick Clark, John Bierkan, Terry Hertzog, Robby Bruns, John Lynch, Ryan Lagergren and Shawn Hall missed the 36-hole cut. Post and Bruns were new to the Philadelphia Section and had qualified for the tournament in the PGA Sections where they had been employed in 2013. Post was the teaching professional at the Chesapeake Bay Golf Club and Bruns was an assistant at Merion Golf Club.

The U.S. Senior Open was held at the Oak Tree National Golf Club in Edmonds, Oklahoma in the second week of July. Scotland’s Colin Montgomerie, who was one of the best golfers to never win a major championship won and for the second time in two months he had won a senior major. He posted rounds of 65, 71, 74 and 69 for a five under par 279. That put him in a tie with Gene Sauers (69-69-68-73—279). A three hole combined score playoff was held which Montgomerie won by one stroke with a one over par total. Woody Austin and David Frost tied for fourth with 283 totals. First prize from a purse of $3,500,000 was $630,000. Joe Daley and John DiMarco missed the cut. Daley was in the tournament off the Senior PGA Tour money list and DiMarco made it as an alternate from sectional qualifying.

Rory McIlroy won the British Open at the Royal Liverpool Golf Club at Hoylake, England in the third week of July. McIlroy opened with a pair of six under par 66s and never looked back. He took a six stroke lead into the weekend. A 68 on Saturday kept him six in from of the field. On Sunday he put together an up and down 71 for a 271. McIlroy finished two strokes in front of Rickie Fowler and Sergio Garcia who tied for second at 273. Jim Furyk shot a 65 in the last round and finished alone in fourth place at 275. Furyk won $478,380 in U.S. dollars. McIlroy won $1,665,788. McIlroy had now won three major championships before the age of 26. Only Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods had achieved that.

The Philadelphia Open was held at the Applebrook Golf Club on the fourth Wednesday of July. For a fourth straight year a member of the Temple University golf team won the tournament. Matt Teesdale, a member at Commonwealth National Golf Club, put together rounds of 68 and 68 for a six under par 136. The field had a two-tee start of the one-day 36 hole event. Teesdale came to his last hole of the day, the 148 yard par three ninth, with a three stroke lead. He proceeded to pull his tee shot. He then played a lob-wedge to the collar of the green, stubbed a putt from there and then putted past the hole. From there he holed a four foot putt for the win. Amateur Michael McDermott finished second at 137. Rich Steinmetz posted a 140 and picked up a check for $7,000 as the low professional. Amateur Alexander Hicks finished fourth at 141. Mark Sheftic, Billy Stewart and Gulph Mills Golf Club assistant professional Josh Rackley tied for fifth with 142 totals.

The two-day Lehigh Valley Open was hosted by the Northampton Country Club in late July. The first day leaders were Greg Farrow and Mike Paukovits who had posted four under par 68s. When they teed off on the 36th hole Paukovits, the teaching professional at St. Davids Golf Club, was still in the lead but tied with Rich Steinmetz and Jake Gerney who were in the clubhouse with 139 totals. Farrow was one stroke back. Paukovits and Farrow both hit good shots to the green. Farrow was away and he holed his ten foot putt to put himself in a three-way tie for the top prize at 138.. Paukovits then proceeded to hole his downhill putt from eight feet for a birdie and the victory. His rounds were 68 and 69. First prize was $2,250.

Billy Stewart won the Philadelphia PGA Assistant Championship on the first Monday of August at the Concord Country Club. Stewart posted a pair of 67s for an eight under par 134 which was four strokes lower than the rest of the field. Rusty Harbold finished second at 138. Josh Rackley and Kevin Nicholson tied for third with 139s. First prize was $1,800. This was also qualifying for the PGA of America Assistant Championship and the Philadelphia Section had been allotted five spots, which was based on the number of entries in this event. The first four spots went to Stewart, Harbold, Rackley and Nicholson. The fifth spot was won by Tony R. Perla in a sudden death playoff with Bill Walker after they had finished tied at 140.

Cleve Coldwater won the Philadelphia PGA Senior Championship on the second Tuesday of August. The two-day tournament was held at the Burlington Country Club. After a first round 72 Coldwater (138) came back with a five under par 66 to win by one stroke. Brian Kelly and Stu Ingraham tied for second at 139. John DiMarco and Terry Hertzog posted 140s and tied for fourth. First prize was $1,300. This was also qualifying for the Senior PGA Professional National Championship and the Section had been allotted seven spots. This was based on the number of entries in the Section event. Don Allan (141) and George Forster, Sr. (141) earned the last two spots in a sudden death playoff with Bill Sautter (141). Sautter became the first alternate.

In the second week of August Rory McIlroy won another major golf tournament, the PGA Championship. It was his fourth and he was still just 25 years old. The tournament was held at the Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville, Kentucky. It rained every day so the greens were soft and the scoring low. McIlroy didn’t hold the lead after every round but he very close with four solid rounds. His first three rounds were 66, 67 and 67 which put him in the lead with one round to play, but only by one stroke. On Sunday morning after play had begun heavy rain flooded the course and play was delayed for almost two hours. When play resumed the remaining starting times were squeezed some in an attempt to complete the tournament that day. After a one over par front nine by McIlroy many who were scoring much better were now in contention. McIlroy then proceeded to make and eagle three on the tenth hole and followed that with two more birdies on #13 and #17. With one hole to play McIlroy now had a two stroke lead. Playing right ahead of Rory was Phil Mickelson and Rickie Fowler who were both two strokes off Rory’s lead. It was getting very dark and in any ordinary tournament play would have been stopped. Then something took place that had probably never happed before. It was becoming quite dark and difficult to see. After Mickelson and Fowler had driven on the par five 18th hole they invited McIlroy and his fellow competitor to tee off while they were walking to their tee shots. McIlroy’s tee shot was to the right and near a water hazard but safe.

Mickelson and Fowler then played their second shots. When they arrived at the green they were then asked by the PGA rules official to step aside again for the McIlroy pairing to play. The play of the tee shots was idea of the players but stepping aside at the green was not. McIlroy then hit his second shot into a front left greenside bunker. Then Mickelson then almost holed a long chip shot but had to settle for a birdie and a total of 269. Fowler three putted for a par and finished at 270. After that McIlroy played his bunker shot to the middle of the green and two putted from thirty feet for a par and the win. McIlroy’s closing 68 gave him a sixteen under par 268. Henrik Stenson tied Fowler for third at 270. First prize from a purse of $10,000,000 was #1,800,000. Jim Furyk played well all week and finished tied for fifth at 272, winning $367,500. Jason Bohn tied for 41st at 282 and won $32,000. Dave McNabb missed the cut. Furyk was in the tournament off several categories and Bohn was there off his position on the 2013 PGA Tour money list. McNabb had qualified at the PGA Professional National Championship in June.

John Pillar
PA Open Champion 2014

John Pillar won the Pennsylvania Open at the Country Club of York in the second week of August. During all three of the tournament rounds Pillar was in contention but never in the lead. After rounds of 67 and 70 Pillar trailed by one stroke as he began the final round. With four holes to play 2010 winner Robert Rohanna led by three strokes but a bogey and a double-bogey put him in the clubhouse with a total of 208. That left him in a tie with Mike Van Sickle (208) who had posted the low round of the tournament, a 65. Soon after that Pillar finished with a one over par 71 and a total of 208 which made it a three-way tie. A sudden death playoff was held on the 18th hole. All three players hit good tee shots. Rohanna’s second shot stopped ten feet to the left of the hole. Pillar was next to play and he played his wedge shot to within two feet of the hole. Van Sickle’s wedge shot landed near the hole but spun back off the green. Van Sickle failed to hole his chip shot and Rohanna’s putt came up short. Now it was up to Pillar and he calmly holed the putt for the title. First prize was $8,000.

The two-day Pro-Am for Wishes tournament was played at the Penn Oaks Golf Club in the third week of August. The first day included a pro-am to raise money for the tournament’s charity. On the second day Billy Stewart came from three strokes behind to win. He put together rounds of 70 and 67 for a five under par 137. Stu Ingraham finished second at 138. Patrick Clark (139) and Mark Parson (140) who was the teaching professional at the Stone Harbor Golf Club finished third and fourth. First prize was $2,700.

George Forster, Sr.
Section Champion 1999 & 2014
With the Check and Trophies

The Philadelphia Section Championship was played at the Llanerch Country Club and the Concord Country Club in the third week of September. On Tuesday and Wednesday the field of 176 players was divided between the two courses with one half at Llanerch and the other at Concord. Par at both courses was 71. After 36 holes there was a cut with the low 60 and ties surviving to play the final round at Llanerch. Teeing off on the 54th hole Stu Ingraham held a one stroke lead over Rusty Harbold, who he was paired with. Most of the players were teeing off with middle irons on what was sometimes a drivable par-four in order to have a full wedge shot to the sloping green. The cup was in the front of the green which made the hole even more difficult. Harbold hit his tee shot into the creek. He dropped out, taking a penalty stroke, and then with no opening to the green chipped out to the fairway. He put his fourth shot on the green and two putted for a double bogey six. Ingraham’s tee shot was in the fairway but in a divot. His second shot came up short of the green, his third finished near the back of the green and he three putted for a six. Ingraham (70-72-72) was tied for the top position with George Forster (71-73-70) who had finished earlier at 214. Forster and Ingraham were sent back to the 18th tee for a sudden death playoff. Twice they played that hole halving it with pars as Ingraham was missing eight foot putts to win. On their third attempt at that same hole Ingraham missed from ten feet to win and Forster holed from eight feet for a birdie to win the Section Championship. At the age of 58 Forster was the oldest winner of the Section Championship eclipsing Marty Furgol who won in 1970 at age 54. First prize from the $71,000 purse was $8,000. Harbold and John Pillar tied for third at 215. This was also the qualifying event for the PGA Professional National Championship. Based on the size of the field in the Section Championship Philadelphia had been allotted twelve spots. Dave McNabb (216) was exempt off his finish in the PGA Professional National Championship in June. The first four places went to Forster, Ingraham, Harbold and Pillar. The fifth and sixth spots went to Patrick Clark (216) and Josh Rackley (216). Robby Bruns, David Quinn, Don Allan and Mike Moses picked up the next four spots with 217 totals. There was a three-way playoff for the last two places which John Lynch (218) and Mark Sheftic (218) captured in a sudden death playoff over Mark Summerville (218). The host professionals were Chris Wilkinson (Llanerch Country Club) and Mike Moses (Concord Country Club). Moses led after the first round with a 65 at his home course.

The Ryder Cup was held at the Gleneagles Hotel in Auchterarder, Scotland during the fourth week of September. The competition took place on the PGA Centenary Course. Each team from the United States PGA and European PGA were composed of 12 professionals. On Friday and Saturday four-ball (better ball) matches were held in the morning and foursome (alternate strokes) matches were played in the afternoon. Each match was worth one point and ties were not played off. On Sunday there were 12 singles matches. The U.S. team lost for the third straight time and had now lost seven of the last eight matches. The final tally was not close as the European team won for the third straight time 16-1/2 to 9-1/2. The U.S. team lost seven of the eight foursome points. Jim Furyk was a member of the team for the ninth time, having been a member of every team since 1997. Furyk won one point and lost three in these matches. Tom Carpus was on the Ryder Cup rules committee at the matches.

On the second Wednesday of October the Philadelphia PGA opposed the Golf Association of Philadelphia amateurs in a team match at the Applebrook Golf Club on a blustery afternoon. There were 12 on each team competing in 12 singles matches and 6 four-ball (better ball) matches. Two of the players had to be seniors. The players were paired in fours with two professionals and two amateurs in each pairing. In each pairing a four-ball match was being played along with two singles matches. Eighteen points were being contested. The David Quinn-Billy Stewart team won 2-1/2 points. The John Pillar-Steve Swartz and Bob Hennefer-Rich Steinmetz teams each won two points. The Josh Rackley-Michael Meisenzahl team won 1-1/2 points. The John Lynch-Neil Maurer team and the senior team of Don Allan-Brian Kelly each won one point. Meisenzahl was an assistant at the Shore Gate Country Club. The final score was 10 points for the PGA and 8 for the GAP team. The standings for the matches now stood at 18 wins for the PGA against two loses and four ties.

 

The state of Pennsylvania erected a historical marker for John J. "Johnny" McDermott on the second Thursday of October. The marker was placed at 1201 South 51st Street in front of the Kingsessing Library. This is the neighborhood where McDermott grew up and learned to play golf at the Aronimink Golf Club, which was then located near there. When McDermott won the United States Open at the Chicago Golf Club in 1911 he was the first American born to win the tournament and he is still the youngest at age 19 to win it. In 1912 he successfully defended his title at the Country Club of Buffalo, by winning the tournament again There were quite a few people in attendance, one of them being the historian for the Chicago Golf Club.

The Philadelphia PGA and the New Jersey PGA met in a team match which had been named the Turnpike Cup. The Aronimink Golf Club hosted the match on the third Wednesday of October. It was a cold day for October. There were twelve players on each team paired up in six two-man combination. Each team had to have two seniors on the team. There were four seniors on the Philadelphia team. There were twelve singles and 6 four-ball matches being contested over 18 holes. The team of Billy Stewart-Rusty Harbold won 3 points. The teams of Dave Quinn-Mark Sheftic and Rich Steinmetz-Patrick Clark each won 2 points. The team of Stu Ingraham-George Forster won 1-1/2 points. The team of Josh Rackley-Steve Swartz won 1 point. The other Philadelphia team was Don Allan-John Allen. When it was all over the Philadelphia PGA had eked out a 9-1/2 to 8-1/2 victory. The Philadelphia team had now won for the third straight year in what was a renewal of an earlier series of matches between the two PGA Sections. The standings for the series now stood at 3 wins for the Philadelphia PGA against none for the New Jersey PGA.

In the third week of October Corey McAlarney won the Section Match Play Championship at the Riverton Country Club. McAlarney defeated Billy Stewart in the final 2&1. Even though McAlarney had to play twice as many holes in his morning match than Stewart, he still had enough golf left get the win. In the morning’s semifinal matches McAlarney had to play six extra holes to get by Rich Steinmetz and Stewart eliminated Rob Shuey 7&6. There were 43 entries so 21 players received byes in order to create a ladder of 64. McAlarney, the professional at the Scott Greens Golf Club, was the 26th seed. First prize was $1,000.

On the fourth Friday of October, Ted Bishop, the president of the PGA of America was impeached. This all came about due to some remarks he made through social media. Soon after the Ryder Cup matches Ian Poulter, a member of the winning European team, came out with a book that disparaged the U.S. captain Tom Watson and Nick Faldo who had been the captain the last time Europe had lost. Watson had been Bishop’s choice as Ryder Cup captain. Also it just happened that Bishop was at the Greenbriar Resort with Faldo when the book came out. Bishop posted something to the effect that Poulter was acting like a school girl crying on the playground. Many in the world of golf came down on Bishop. The PGA held a meeting via a telephone conference call. Bishop had a chance to state his case and apologize which he did. He was given a chance to resign but he declined to do so. Bishop was then impeached. Along with that he would not be the honorary president as immediate past presidents are and could never attend any PGA tournaments or affairs in an official capacity.

The Philadelphia Section held its fall meeting at the Wilmington Country Club on the fourth Monday of October. As they have done many times Clark Luis opened the meeting by singing our national anthem and John Carpineta gave the invocation. Carpineta was the teaching professional at the Bensalem Township Country Club and a late comer to the PGA having attained membership at the age of 59. Pete Bevacqua, the PGA of America’s CEO was the featured speaker. He began his speech by addressing the impeachment of our national president Ted Bishop. After that he covered various national topics from the Ryder Cup to the PGA Golf Club at Port St. Lucie, Florida. One item of importance was the announcement that the Philadelphia Cricket club would be hosting the PGA Professional National Championship in 2015. The Section’s junior golf program had another good year with 888 juniors registered. The Section held 72 junior tour events, which was ten more than the previous year. The Section’s finances were on budget and being enhanced with an additional $30,000 in ADP money coming from the PGA of America in the next fiscal year. Even with the purchase of a building for the Section office there was $497,370 in the Reserve Fund as of the end of August. David Quinn was the Section’s "Player of the Year" for a third time and the second year in a row. The DeBaufre trophy for scoring average was won for a seventh time by Stu Ingraham with an average of 70.40. Ingraham also was the Skee Riegel "Senior Player of the Year" for the eighth time.

Leo DeGisi
2 Term PGA of America Director
Philadelphia PGA Hall of Fame 2014

Three Philadelphia Section professionals; Elio A. "Leo" DeGisi, Charles Edward "Mike" Swisher and Harry "Jake" Obitz, Jr. were inducted into the Section’s Hall of Fame at the Section’s fall meeting.

Leo .DeGisi immigrated to the United States with his family from Italy at the age of six. When he was twelve he followed his brother Tony to the Gulph Mills Golf Club for work as a caddy. Soon he was working for the professional Al Keeping in the golf shop. At age 16 he was made caddy master and he continued in that position while attending Temple University, graduating with an MBA in accounting. After that he worked under Henry McQuiston at the Bala Golf Club before becoming the head professional at the Medford Village Country Club in 1979. He became involved with the Section as a member of the junior golf committee, serving for eleven years and chairing the committee for three years. He was elected district director for 1987 and 1988. The next year he was elected to Section office as the 2nd vice president. After one year in that office he was the treasurer for two years and then president in 1992 and 1993. With his degree in accounting he brought a new level of expertise to the Section’s board of directors. In 2002 he began a three-year term as a PGA of America director representing District II which was comprised of the Metropolitan, New Jersey and Philadelphia PGA Sections. In 2011 he was elected to that office again. His six years in that office was more than any Philadelphia Section member had ever held. He attended 22 national PGA meetings as a delegate or alternate delegate. In 2004 he became the general manager at Medford village as well and was still holding both professional and manager at the time of his induction into the Section’s Hall of Fame. DeGisi was the Section’s "Junior Golf Leader" in 1987 and the "Golf Professional of the Year" in 1996.

Mike Swisher
Philadelphia PGA
Golf Professional of the Year-1990
Hall of Fame 2014

Mike Swisher was introduced to golf as a caddy at the Fairview Golf & Country Club. It wasn't long before he was working for the professional, Harlan Will. When he graduated from high school he turned pro and began his professional career at Fairview. Except for one year as an assistant at Coatesville Country Club and a year under Jay Weitzel at Hershey Country Club he spent his entire professional career in Lebanon where he was born. He spent three years as the assistant at Lebanon Country Club and 42 years as the head professional. When he became the head professional at Lebanon he told the board of directors that he was going to have the best ladies and junior golf programs in the state and he spent the next 42 years doing that. He turned out some of the best young golfers in Pennsylvania. Stu Ingraham, Greg Lesher, Blaine Peffley and Jennifer Johnson won numerous professional tournaments. There was a waiting list to work for Swisher, even in the bag storage room. He founded the Lebanon County Junior Golf Program which grew to a yearly turnout of 250 boys and girls. For 40 years he was a force behind the Central Counties Chapter of the Philadelphia PGA. He was president for three years, "Golf Professional of the Year" in 1990 and won the Chapter’s championship in 1973. Swisher was inducted into the Central Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame in 1994 and he was the Harrisburg District Golf Association "Man of the Year" twice. He was always ready to host events for the Section, the Chapter and various charities. Swisher was the Philadelphia Section "Junior Golf Leader" in 1999 and the Section’s "Golf Professional of the Year" in 1985.

Harry Obitz
Philadelphia PGA
Golf Professional of the Year-1955
Hall of Fame-2014

Harry Obitz grew up in California and began his golf career there. In 1941 he arrived in the Philadelphia Section as an assistant to Joe Kirkwood, Sr. at the Huntingdon Valley Country Club. After two years at Huntingdon Valley he served three years in the United States Navy for the duration of World War II. In 1946 he became the professional at the Shawnee Inn & Country Club. At Shawnee he created a golf show which he named "The Swing is the Thing". Every weekend he and his assistants put on that show for the guests at Shawnee. The show was such a hit Obitz and his assistants were invited to perform at veteran’s hospitals all over the United States. Later the show went around the world. They were invited to President Eisenhower’s 50th birthday party which was in Hershey and they performed at the Section’s Spring Golf Show several times, never taking a fee. Obitz hosted the Philadelphia Section Championship seven straight years. He may have been the father of the shotgun start as he found a way to get the golfing guests out on the golf course at almost the same time on Sunday mornings so they could then have lunch, attend his golf show and be on their way home. He instructed celebrities like Eisenhower, Jackie Gleason, Perry Como and Bob Hope. Obitz authored instruction books on golf and for 36 years he wrote instruction articles for Golf Magazine. He created the Bermuda Good Will Tournament, which is still being played and he designed several golf courses in Nebraska. A large number of assistants who worked for him became successful head professionals. In 1955 the PGA of America instituted the "Golf Professional of the Year" award and Obitz was the Philadelphia Section’s first recipient.

The PGA Assistant Championship was played on the PGA Golf Club’s Wanamaker Course in Port St. Lucie, Florida. The tournament began on the last Thursday of October and ended on the first Monday of November. Grant Sturgeon, from the Metropolitan Section, won with a thirteen under par 275 (71-69-70-65). Kenny Pigman finished second at 282. Brian Norman (283) was third and Scott Berliner (286) was fourth. First prize from a purse of $100,000 was $9,000. Billy Stewart tied for 18th at 292 and won $1,075. Rusty Harbold tied for 22nd at 293 and won $950. Tony R. Perla finished tied for 43rd with a 298 total and won $645. Josh Rackley posted a 300 total and won $555 for a 53rd place tie. Kevin Nicholson missed the cut. In the first round Perla posted a seven under par 65, which was tied for the lead. No one posted a lower round during the tournament.

The Senior PGA Professional National Championship was held at the PGA Golf Club in Port St. Lucie, Florida in the middle of November. It was played on the Wanamaker and Ryder Courses. The New Jersey Section’s Frank Esposito (64-70-67-71) won by four strokes with a sixteen under par 272. Steve Schneiter, Rick Schuller and James Mason tied for second at 276. First prize was $20,000 from a purse of $285,000. The tournament was also qualifying for the Senior PGA Championship. Stu Ingraham finished ninth at 281 and won $5,600. George Forster (287) tied for 32nd winning $2,000. Ingraham picked up one of the 35 spots in the Senior PGA Championship. Forster ended up in a sudden death playoff for one of the last four spots which he failed to win. He became the third alternate. John DiMarco, Brian Kelly, Cleve Coldwater, Terry Hertzog and Don Allan missed the cut. They had all qualified for the tournament at the Philadelphia Section Senior Championship.

The PGA of America’s national meeting was held in the third week of November in Indianapolis, Indiana at the JW Marriot Hotel. It was an election year. Derek Sprague who had been the vice president for two years was elected president without opposition and Paul Levy moved from secretary to vice president without opposition. History was made when a female, Suzy Whaley, was elected secretary. It was the first time that a female had held a national office in the PGA of America. She was elected on the first ballot when she received 52.63 percent of the votes. The national awards were presented at an awards dinner. Scott Nye was honored as the PGA Merchandiser of the Year for private facilities. The Section’s two living national presidents, Dick Smith, Sr. and Jack Connelly were in attendance. The Section was represented by John Pillar and Ian Dalzell along with alternate delegates and its executive directory Geoff Surrette.

Scott Nye
PGA of America
Merchandiser of the Year
2014
Scott Nye grew up in golf. His father was a golf professional and the coach of the College of Wooster (Ohio) golf team. His brother Greg was the golf coach at Penn State University and another brother was a PGA member as well. Nye graduated from the College of Wooster while playing on his father’s golf team. As an assistant he worked at Canoe Brook Golf Club and Caves Valley Golf Club. His first head professional position brought him to the Philadelphia Section as the professional at the Country Club of York in 1989. After eleven years at York he moved to Merion Golf Club as the head professional in 2000. At Merion he managed a 30-person staff and a 950-square foot golf shop. In 2013 Nye and Merion hosted the United States Open. He was the Section’s “Golf Professional of the Year” and the Merchandiser of the Year for private facilities in 2012.

The PGA Tour was now ending its season in September and beginning a new season wraparound season. The leading money winner was Rory McIlroy with $8,280,096 in 17 events. Jim Furyk had another great year as he was third on the money list with earnings of $5,987,395. He entered 21 tournaments and made the cut in all 21. Jason Bohn finished 65th on the money list with winnings of $1,585,189 in 15 tournaments. Sean O’Hair had a second consecutive down year. He won $408,793 in 25 tournaments. That left him in 159th place and needing to play the final four tournaments of the Web.com Tour in order to hang onto his PGA Tour exemption. A tie for third at Las Vegas which earned O’Hair a check for $58,000 kept him on the PGA Tour for another year. He was again one of those players with status outside the all-exempt top 125. His position was 156.. McIlroy was the PGA "Player of the Year" and the winner of the Vardon Trophy for scoring average. He averaged 68.82 strokes a round for his 66 rounds on the PGA Tour.

Bernhard Langer led the PGA Senior Tour money list with $3,074,189 in 21 tournaments. Joe Daley won $300,903 in 20 events. That left him in 54th place on the money list and meant that he had to return to qualifying school in order to regain his playing privileges.

Adam Hadwin was the leading money winner on the PGA Tour’s Developmental Tour which was now called the Web.com tour. He won $529,792 in 21 tournaments. Vince Covello played in one tournament and won $1,620.

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