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A Chronicle of the Philadelphia Section PGA and Golf in the Philadelphia Area
by Peter C. Trenham
1970 to 1979
Contents

1970 Bert Yancey won the Crosby, finished third at the Masters and was 13th on the money list with $110,405.
1971 Art Wall won the Section Championship for the fifth time.
1972 Dick Hendrickson won the Section Championship, the Philadelphia Open and the Schmidt’s Golf Festival.
1973 Dick Hendrickson won a second straight Philadelphia Open and the Schmidt’s Golf Festival for a third time.
1974 Art Wall finished second in the PGA Seniors’ Championship and Bert Yancey was third in the U.S. Open.
1975 At the age of 51 Art Wall won on the PGA Tour at the Milwaukee Open.
1976 Andy Thompson won the Section Championship and finished second at the Pennsylvania Open.
1977 Two former Section pros won on the PGA Tour. Hubert Green won the U.S. Open and Jerry McGee won the IVB.
1978 Dick Smith, Sr. put together a 278 and a tie for 17th at the IVB Golf Classic at Whitemarsh Valley Country Club.
1979 The Philadelphia PGA defeated the Middle Atlantic PGA to take a 7 to 4 lead in the Challenge Cup matches.

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1970 - As a new decade began there were 6,641 PGA members. The touring pros were playing for $6,854,597 but the business of being a club professional was becoming more difficult. Apprentice golf professionals had to attend two business schools and pass a test. The first PGA business schools for assistants were held in the late 50s but there wasn’t a test. There were many different contract arrangements between the clubs and the pros. The head pro’s income generally came from merchandise sales, club storage, lessons, renting practice balls, golf carts and a retainer. The use of riding golf carts had increased and the clubs were taking over that concession. The assistants were making about $125 per week plus some lesson income. Most pros had a full time assistant and a full time bagroom man. The Philadelphia Section was recommending $6 per half hour for golf lessons and $25 per bag for club storage. Club cleaners were making $1.50 per hour. Many of the clubs considered the professional to be an independent contractor and didn’t offer hospitalization or retirement programs. The PGA Tour had 43 events on its schedule that offered $100,000 or more in prize money. The largest purse was $300,000 at the Dow Jones Open in Clifton, New Jersey.

The Shakespeare Golf Company introduced the graphite shaft at the PGA Merchandise Show in January. It took a few more years of minor changes to produce a shaft that the strong hitters could use but the game of golf would never be the same again. Frank W. Thomas the sales manager for the Plymouth Golf Ball Company, a division of Shakespeare located in Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania had been devoting all of his time to the development of a graphite shaft since 1966. A number of the Philadelphia professionals were the first ones to test these new shafts. The graphite shaft weighed 2.9 ounces compared to 4.5 ounces for the steel shaft. That made it possible to reduce the weight of a driver from 13.5 ounces to 12 ounces. At that time a pound of graphite cost $500 so a steel shaft driver that retailed for about $40 now was well over $100 with a graphite shaft.

Two groups of Philadelphia Section professionals announced that they were building golf courses that they would also operate. Newly retired Lu Lu Country Club professional Charles Schneider, Sr., his three golf professional sons Charles Jr., George and Herman and other businessmen were constructing the Neshaminy Valley Golf Club. Bob Hendricks, who had resigned after 17 years as the professional at the Indian Valley Country Club, was designing and constructing the Avalon Golf Club. Hendricks and a group of pros from the Section who were silent partners at that time owned the club. Hendricks would be the professional, green superintendent and general manager.


Bert Yancey
Won 1963 Pennsylvania Open
Won 7 times on the PGA Tour

Bert Yancey won the $125,000 Bing Crosby Pro-Am in the fourth week of January. There were 168 pros playing with a like number of amateur partners. Yancey was wearing a copper bracelet for a sore elbow. A 67 at the Cypress Point Club in the first round put him in a four-way tie for first and he held the lead all four days. In gale force winds on Friday he tacked on a 70 at the sheltered Spyglass Hill Golf Club to take a two-stroke lead. On Saturday he posted a par round of 72 at the Pebble Beach Golf Links and stayed in front by one stroke. Yancey put together a solid 69 on Sunday for a ten under par 278. That should have given him the title with strokes to spare except Jack Nicklaus had other ideas. Nicklaus played the front nine in 30 strokes and finished with a 65 but Yancey hung on to his lead by making pars on the last seven holes to win by one stroke. First prize was $25,000. Bobby Nichols and Howie Johnson tied for third at 283.

Sam Snead won the PGA Seniors’ Championship on the 1st of February. It was held at the PGA National Golf Club in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida for the sixth time. Snead’s four rounds of 71, 71, 72 and 76 gave him a two over par 290, which was the first over par winning score since 1952. First prize was $4,000. The weather was bad and when there was a rain delay in the second round Tommy Bolt, the defending champion, withdrew with the flu. Fred Haas, a former winner, finished second at 292. Henry Ransom, Bob Hamilton and Chandler Harper tied for third with 294s. Marty Furgol (300), the teaching pro at the Ramblewood Country Club, tied for 13th and won $587.50. The new professional at the Brookside Country Club near Allentown, Billy Gilbert (303) finished 24th and won $350. Clint Kennedy (306), the professional at the Spring Lake Driving Range tied for 30th. Bob Hendricks (311) won $100 for his 47th place showing. John Vasco, Section President and professional at the Lehigh Country Club, was the president of the national PGA Seniors organization and he also directed the PGA Merchandise Show.

At the Section’s spring meeting President, John Vasco, announced that the Section’s executive director, Bob Jones, was going to resign. Jones was leaving the PGA to go to work for the George Washington Motor Lodge, a chain of motels in the Philadelphia suburbs. The motel chain was going to sponsor an LPGA Tour tournament called the George Washington Classic at the motel’s golf course, Hidden Springs Country Club. Jones was going to be the tournament director of the event, which was scheduled for June. Jones’ secretary, Alleyn Parker, was promoted to executive secretary and managed the Section’s office. Dick Hendrickson, the Section’s tournament chairman and professional at the Little Mill Country Club, announced that there were now three more Schmidt’s Open tournaments on the schedule and C. Schmidt and Sons was also adding $5,000 to the Section Championship purse. Instead of paying out $3,500 to the Schmidt’s yearend point leaders the money had been reduced to $500 but Schmidt’s total involvement now came to $21,800 for the year. The meeting was held at the George Washington Motor Lodge in King of Prussia on the fourth Monday of March. The details for the upcoming golf show on the first Monday of April were presented to the Section members and the press. An assistants’ school was on the schedule for the next Monday and an education seminar was being held one week later.

The new slate of Section officers had eliminated the Board of Control, which had always been appointed by the Section president and the other officers. In order to give all of the professionals in the Section a voice in its affairs the officers divided the Section into six districts. Each district had one vote except the Philadelphia metropolitan area, which had two votes as it had twice as many members as any other district. South Jersey was District I and District II was the state of Delaware. District III included the southern Pennsylvania region from Lancaster County to the western boundary. The northern Pennsylvania counties from State College to the Scranton area made up District IV. District V consisted of the greater Allentown region. District VI included the counties Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, Philadelphia and Bucks-south of Route 202. A chapter was created for the professionals in the central counties of Pennsylvania. That gave those professionals an opportunity to schedule competitions and education seminars that were more convenient to them.

In early April Hubert Green joined Bill Kittleman’s staff at the Merion Golf Club. Fred Austin had retired after 24 years as the head professional and Kittleman had moved up to the top position. Green, a former two-time Southern Amateur champion from Birmingham, Alabama, had been selected for the Walker Cup team the previous year but he had withdrawn from the team in order to turn pro. When he failed to qualify for the PGA Tour he needed a place to earn some money and work on his game and Merion was the right place for him. Thirty years before that another Birmingham native, Sam Byrd, had honed his game as the assistant at Merion.

The Section’s 13th annual golf show was held at the George Washington Motor Lodge in King of Prussia on the first Monday of April. The featured guests were LPGA star Marilyn Smith and trick shot artist Tony Longo, who was a former Section member. More than 100 pros from the Section were there for the morning trade show and then they participated in the afternoon-evening free instruction for the public. For the public a highlight of the show was the video taping of their swings and being able to see it later on the TV monitors. Sixty-five pro-golf salesmen showed off their wares. The professionals had a private show in the morning and then it opened to the public from noon to 9:00 PM. A large astro-turf putting green and the fashion shows were the main attractions.

The Masters Tournament was played in the second week of April. The last six holes were televised on CBS with one hour of coverage on Saturday and one and one-half hours on Sunday. Bert Yancey was obsessed with winning the Masters Tournament and he showed everyone how important it was to him by withdrawing from the Greensboro Open after the first round so he could get to Augusta earlier. After shooting a 78 he told the Greensboro sponsor that he wasn’t injured but he wanted to leave. He and the sponsor had a misunderstanding over his release and Joe Dye, the commissioner of the PGA Tour, fined him $150. Yancey made the best of it by posting a first round 69 to trail by one stroke and added on a second round 70, which gave him a share of the lead at the halfway point. Yancey shot a par round of 72 in the third round and trailed by three. On Sunday he was tied for the lead when he teed off on #10 and he reached the 18th tee needing a birdie to tie for first but he made a bogie and finished fourth at 281. Billy Casper and Gene Littler were tied at the top with 279s and Casper won the tournament with a 69 against a 74 for Littler in Monday’s playoff. Casper’s tournament rounds were 72, 68, 68 and 71. First prize was $25,000 and the total payout exceeded $200,000. Yancey won $$10,000. Gary Player finished third with a 280. Art Wall, who represented the Pocono Manor Country Club on the PGA Tour, missed the cut by two strokes.

On the fourth Monday in May Dick Hendrickson led sixteen pros and amateurs through the local qualifying for the U.S. Open. Hendrickson (140) put together two one-under-par rounds of 70 at the Lu Lu Country Club and the Manufacturers Golf & Country Club. Bob Ross, the professional at the Philadelphia Cricket Club, finished second with a 142. Next with 143s were Tony Perla, an assistant at the Philadelphia Country Club and Willie Scholl the professional at the Gulph Mills Golf Club. Henry McQuiston, the professional at the Bala Golf Club, and Pete Trenham, the professional at the St. Davids Golf Club, tied for fifth with 145s. Skee Riegel, professional and part owner of the Bucks County Country Club, Radnor Valley Country Club’s professional Jerry Pisano, Ted McKenzie, the professional at the Waynesborough Country Club, Bill Decker, an assistant at the Merion Golf Club and reinstated amateur Bucky Erhardt tied for seventh with 146s. Tim DeBaufre, the teaching professional at the Waynesborough Country Club, finished alone in eleventh place with a 147. Dick Smith, Sr., the Director of Golf at the Hi-Point Golf Club, Bill Hackett, the assistant at the Green Hill Golf Club, Bob Thatcher, the professional at the Aronimink Golf Club, and Dennis Milne, the assistant to his father George at the Trenton Country Club, turned in 148s and survived a six-man playoff to wrap up the last four places. There were 62 professionals and 27 amateurs in the field. Bert Yancey was fully exempt off his standing on the PGA Tour and his finish at the Open the year before.

Jeff Steinberg, the assistant at the Berkshire Country Club and the professional at the Silver Spring Golf Club Charlie Gilbert, also made it through local qualifying for the U.S. Open on the fourth Monday of May. They posted three over par 147s at the rain soaked Blue Ridge Country Club as they shared co-medalist honors at the Central Pennsylvania site. Amateur Wayne Jacobs picked up the third spot with a 148 and Howard Kramer, the professional at the Host Farm Resort & Golf Club, was next at 151. Another amateur Mike Kanoff was fifth at 152, Mike Swisher, the professional at the Lebanon Country Club, finished sixth with a 154 and an amateur and future Section member, Jerry Janeski, took the seventh and last place with a 155.

On the second Tuesday in June Dick Smith, Sr. qualified for the U.S. Open on Long Island at The Seawane Club and the Woodmere Club. Smith (139) put together rounds of 69 and 70 to finish three strokes behind the medalist, Paul Harney (136). The 144 scorers had to play off for the last of the thirteen places that were up for grabs on Long Island.

Howard Kramer also passed the qualifying test for the U.S. Open on Tuesday. Kramer shot rounds of 78 and 70 to pick up one of the six spots allotted to the field at the Greencastle Country Club in Maryland. The medalist at Greencastle was Rickey Meissner with a 71 and a 70 for a three under par 141. It took a score of 148 to qualify there.

The U.S. Open was played at the highly criticized Hazeltine National Golf Club near Minneapolis in the third week of June. Tony Jacklin opened up with a windswept 71 that gave him a two-stroke lead and then he tacked on three rounds of 70. He led all the way and finished seven strokes in from of Dave Hill. Jacklin was also the reigning British Open champion and the first British golfer to win our Open since 1920 when Ted Ray won at Inverness. Bert Yancey led the Philadelphia contingent with a 297. He won $1,452 with a tie for 22nd. Dick Smith, Sr. turned in a very creditable 76 in the first round and followed it up with three more steady rounds for a total of 301, which gave him a tie for 44th and a check for $975. First prize was $30,000. All of the professionals who started in the Open and missed the cut received $500. Howard Kramer missed the cut.

Jack Nicklaus won the British Open at the St. Andrews Golf Club in the second week of July. When Doug Sanders teed off on his 72nd hole all he needed was a par to edge out Nicklaus by one stroke. He played a solid tee shot to within wedge distance of the hole. His second shot was past the pin to the back part of the green. From there he putted to within three feet of the cup but then failed to hole what would have been the winning putt. Sanders (68-71-71-73) and Nicklaus (68-69-73-73) were tied at 283. In the 18-hole playoff the next day Sanders birdied the last hole but Nicklaus followed with a birdie of his own for a 72 versus a 73 for Sanders. Lee Trevino and Harold Henning tied for third at 285. First prize was $5,250. Bert Yancey posted a 292 and tied for 13th, winning $625.

The Philadelphia Golf Classic, now in its eighth year, was again played at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club the week after the British Open. The host professional, Sam Penecale, had an exemption but he decided that being a host, a merchandiser and a contestant was too much and he opted out of the tournament. The prize money was $150,000 and it was the start of a run of seven weeks on the PGA Tour offering purses of that much or more. Qualifying was held on Monday with 132 players competing for 15 places in the tournament field. Henry McQuiston and Willie Scholl made it through the qualifying with 71s. John Schroeder led with a 69. On the way to winning his third tournament of the year Billy Casper (274) broke the tournament record of 276. Casper started with a 68 and a 67 to take the lead and he added on a 71 and a 68 to finish three strokes in front of Terry Wilcox (277). Frank Beard, Richard Crawford and Bunky Henry tied for third at 279. Bert Yancey led the local professionals with a 285, which gave him a tie for 25th and a check for $1,133. Art Wall (286) finished one stroke farther back in a tie for 31st and won $935. Bob Schoener, Jr. (298), the assistant at the Green Pond Golf Club, finished 71st and won the last money of $286. First prize was $30,000. Bob Ross, Al Besselink, who was playing the PGA Tour part time, McQuiston, Dick Hendrickson, Scholl and Don Stough, the professional at the Gettysburg Country Club, missed the cut. The tournament set a record as 22,000 attended on Sunday, which brought the total for the four days to 63,000, both were records. Another record might have been set as eight professionals withdrew after teeing off in the tournament, including Jack Nicklaus and Lee Trevino.

The Section held a summer meeting in mid July at the George Washington Motor Lodge in King-of-Prussia. PGA President, Leo Fraser, and the national vice president from District II, Jim Warga, were in attendance to report on the affairs of the national association. Henry McQuiston reviewed job contract guidelines. At the meeting District Directors for the Section were elected.

The 15,000 Prior Golf Festival was played in the last week on July but it didn’t end until six days later due to a playoff for the top prize. The four-day tournament kicked off at the Woodcrest Country Club on a Thursday and then moved to the Radley Run Country Club for Friday’s round. There was a day off on Saturday so the professionals could attend to their club jobs. On Sunday the tournament was at the Manufacturers Golf & Country Club. The pros played with amateurs the first three days as each pairing was made up of two pros and two amateurs. There was prize money for the pro-am event each day. On Monday the pros were paired together at the Torresdale-Frankford Country Club to battle it out for the prize money and the title. In Monday’s round Jack Kiefer, who was playing the PGA Tour, moved up from third place to finish in a tie with Dick Hendrickson at 288. Kiefer’s rounds were 72, 76, 69, 71 and Hendrickson’s had rounds of 75, 73, 68 and 72. An 18-hole playoff was held on Sunday at Torresdale-Frankford and Kiefer put together a solid par 70 round to win the $3,000 first place check by four strokes. Jerry Pisano, who led the tournament for three rounds, slipped to a 76 and finished in a tie for third with Bob Schoener, Jr. at 290.

On the first Monday in August Dick Smith, Sr. won the Philadelphia Open at the Philmont Country Club. Philmont’s North and South courses were both used. In the morning round Smith posted a three-over-par 73 on the North Course and he came back with a two-under-par 68 on the shorter South course in the afternoon. His 141 nipped Northampton Country Club’s professional Bob Hutnik (142) by one stroke. There was a four-way tie for third at 143 between the host professional Buzz Garvin, Jerry Pisano, Bob Schoener, Jr. and Philmont amateur Art Blank. Smith’s winning check was for $580 and Hutnik won $470.

The Pennsylvania Open was played at the Sewickley Heights Golf Club on Monday and Tuesday, the same week the PGA Championship was being played. The tournament ended in a tie as amateur Jim Masserio (74-73) from the Duquesne Country Club and the Duquesne professional Eli Marovich (71-76) shot three over par 147s. A sudden death playoff was held and Masserio won it with a par on the first extra hole when Marovich missed a five-foot par putt. Masserio turned pro later and became a long time member of the Philadelphia Section. Hubert Green and Willie Beljan tied for third at 148. Dick Smith, Sr. and Charlie Gilbert tied for fifth with 149s. The field was cut to the low 60 and ties after the first round and all of the scores under 80 made it.

The PGA Championship was played in mid August at the Southern Hills Country Club in Tulsa. The purse had been increased by $25,000 to $200,000. It was Dave Stockton’s week. Stockton began with a pair of 70s and a third round 66 put him in front by three strokes. With a third round 73 he hung on to pick up his only major title with a one under par 279. Stockton finished two strokes in front of Arnold Palmer (281) and Bob Murphy (281). Gene Littler and Larry Hinson tied for fourth with 282s. First prize was $40,000. Bert Yancey tied for 22nd at 290 and won $1,825. Dick Hendrickson and Al Besselink missed the cut. Yancey was exempt off his position on the previous year’s money list. Hendrickson had qualified through the PGA Club Professional Championship and Besselink, was in the field as 1969 Philadelphia Section champion.

Qualifying for the PGA Club Professional Championship was at the Merion Golf Club’s West Course on the third Monday in September. The Section had been allotted five spots plus the new Section champion would be exempt. The medalist was the Cedarbrook Hill Country Club professional John Carson (141) who turned in a 74 in the morning and came back with a three under par 67 in the afternoon. The second spot went to Dick Smith, Sr., who finished one shot behind the medalist with a 142. Lancaster Country Club assistant Dave Collingwood qualified with a 144 and Pete Trenham avoided a playoff with a 146. There was a tie for the last spot at 147 between Lancaster Country Club professional John Abernethy and Mays Landing Golf Club’s Stan Dudas. When Dudas failed to appear for a playoff the spot was awarded to Abernethy. Trenham chose not to play in the tournament and Dudas replaced him in the field. The second alternate Howard Kramer who had qualified with a 149 was added to the starting field when the Section champion, Marty Furgol, didn’t enter the championship. Kramer withdrew before the tournament started so Brookside Country Club professional Pete Dever, who had been the third alternate with a 150 score made the trip to California for the tournament.


Marty Furgol
1970 Section Champion
Won 5 times on the PGA Tour

The Section Championship was held at the Radley Run Country Club on the last three days of September. There were 89 entries. The defending champion, Al Besselink, could not defend his title as he was now working in New York and not a Section member. The host pro was Chet Munson. With the help of $5,000 from C. Schmidt and Sons brewery and a program book the pros were playing for $7,700. Par was 72 and no one broke 70 during the tournament. Marty Furgol, a PGA Tour veteran, played steady golf and emerged with the victory. Furgol posted a 72 on Monday, which gave him a tie for the lead and he tacked on a 73 on Tuesday. That left him in second place two strokes behind Philadelphia Country Club assistant Willie Maples. That year Maples was putting one-handed with his right hand and having great success. On Wednesday Furgol and Maples came to the last green all even. Furgol holed a 12-foot downhill putt for a par and a 72. Maples’ five-foot par putt hit the back of the hole and stayed out. Furgol posted a 217 winning $1,200 and possession of the Bulletin Cup for one year. At age 54 Furgol was by far the oldest winner of the Section Championship. Maples ended up in a tie for second with Dick Hendrickson at 218 and they each took away $725. Howard Kramer finished fourth at 219 one stroke ahead of Tim DeBaufre (220) and Dick Smith, Sr. (220).

After failing to earn his PGA Tour playing privileges the year before Hubert Green picked up his tour card at the Q-School in the first week of November. Green posted a four round 284 total at the Tucson Country Club, which gave him a tie for fifth place. A future Section member, Bob Bourne (283) finished one stroke ahead of Green in a tie for second. The medalist was Bob Barbarossa with a score of 279. In order to reach the final qualifying stage in Tucson the players had to get through one of nine pre-qualifying 54-hole tournaments that would trim the field of 182 entrants to a manageable number for the final stage.

The Section’s Schmidt’s Challenge Cup team defeated the Middle Atlantic Section at the Radley Run Country Club and evened the record at two wins for each Section. The matches had been scheduled for two days in late October at the Shawnee Country Club (PA) but after two days of rain and no golf the matches were moved to the Radley Run Country Club on the first Tuesday of November. The match was reduced to one day. Each pairing was made up of two pros from each team. Each group of four players played for three points, a better-ball match and two singles. In the number one group Dick Hendrickson & Dick Smith, Sr. won the better-ball match even though they both lost their singles matches. In the second group Willie Scholl & Dave Collingwood won their better-ball match and Scholl won his singles match. In the third pairing Willie Maples won his singles match and in the fourth group Jerry Pisano & Dennis Milne halved their better-ball, Pisano won his singles match and Milne halved his match. With four pairings finished the points stood 6 to 6 so it all came down to the last match on the course. Bob Schoener, Jr. won his match, Bob Ross halved his match and the better-ball finished even giving Philadelphia the edge 8 to 7. Non-playing captain Skee Riegel was awarded the Marty Lyons trophy as the team’s most valuable member. The other team member was Marty Furgol.

The Section held a fall golf show at the Ivystone Inn in Pennsauken, New Jersey on the first Wednesday of November. The Section had hosted many outstanding golf shows and this was one of the best except that the attendance was very low. There was a daylong downpour and the weather was of such magnitude that it included tornado like winds and water spouts off the Jersey Shore. The public and most of the golf pros just stayed home. The show’s guest celebrities were Tom Weiskopf and Carol Mann who each put on two clinics during the day. There were fashion shows, 55 pro golf salesmen displayed their wares and the professionals offered free instruction in the driving nets. The show chairmen were Dick Hendrickson and John Vasco. Bob Thatcher arraigned the fashion shows and Pete Dever was in charge of the instruction.

The national meeting was in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida in the last week of October. The Section’s delegates were John Vasco and Jerry Pisano. New officers were elected. President Leo Fraser stepped down and Warren Orlick moved up to take his place. Bill Clark moved from treasurer to secretary and former Section member Henry Poe won a three-man race for treasurer. The PGA officers had great news for the PGA members. The officers and the PGA lawyers had worked out a pension plan for the PGA members with the Internal Revenue Service. A club could put $50 a month into the pension plan for each PGA member employed at the facility. The payments were tax deductible for the club and no taxes were assessed to the money or the earnings until he began drawing funds at retirement. The delegates directed the PGA staff to pursue the Department of Labor to try to overturn its decision to combine the golf shop operation with the total income of the club when applying the minimum wage rules. The PGA had created a Master PGA Member classification. There were several resolutions presented to eliminate the Master PGA category but they were all defeated. The PGA announced that there would be no one inducted into the Hall of Fame. The members of the Hall of Fame committee were unwilling to make a selection. The Hall of Fame was started in 1940 when two professionals and two amateurs were chosen. From 1953 through 1969 at least one person had been added each year.


Wally Paul
"Golf Professional of the Year"
1970

On the second Monday of November Bob Ross was elected president of the Section at its annual meeting. The meeting was held at the George Washington Motor Lodge in King of Prussia. For the second straight year the new president was nominated from the floor. Ninety-eight votes were cast with Ross winning the election over the incumbent John Vasco in what was called a close vote. Bob Thatcher was elected first vice president and Henry McQuiston was reelected second vice president. Dick Hendrickson, who had been the first vice president," was elected secretary and the new treasurer was Charlie Gilbert. The Section’s new Chapter in the central counties elected officers and their first president was John Abernethy. The Section’s "Golf Professional of the Year" award went to Wally Paul, a PGA member of 26 years and now the professional at the Fairways Golf Club. He was selected for his development of many junior golfers, his work at the assistant’s schools and for his many hours spent as the starter and scorer at the Section’s tournaments. Paul was signed on as the official scorer for the next year’s U.S. Open at Merion Golf Club. Hendrickson was the "Player of the Year", won the DeBaufre Trophy with a scoring average of 71.56 and he led the Schmidt’s point competition. It was reported that the Section had raised $6,456 for National Golf Day, which put them in fifth place among the 37 PGA Sections. The Section also donated $1,000 to the J. Wood Platt Caddy Scholarship Fund.

A future Section member, Rex Baxter, won the PGA Club Professional Championship in mid November. Baxter put together a 285 to nip Bob Duden (286) and Ernie George (286) by one stroke. The tournament was held at the Sunol Valley Country Club in northern California. The purse was $50,000. Dick Smith, Sr. had a chance to win as rounds of 74, 71 and 70 placed him only two strokes back of the leader entering the final round. At one point early in the last round Smith was tied for the lead but a four-putt green ended his chance to win. He finished with a 73 that left him in a six-way tie for fourth, three strokes off the winning pace. Smith’s tie for fourth qualified him for the 1971 PGA Championship. Baxter’s (285) four rounds were 71, 68, 75 and 71. Smith (288) picked up a check for $1,758. Stan Dudas (297) tied for 57th and John Carson (310) tied for 106th. They each won the last money of $71.43. John Abernethy, Dave Collingwood and Pete Dever missed the cut.

Billy Casper was selected PGA "Player of the Year" by the executive committee of the PGA of America. He also won the award in 1966 and he probably would have won it in 1968 but there was no award due to the player controversy. The leading money winner was Lee Trevino with $157,037 and he also won the Vardon Trophy with a stroke average of 70.64. Bert Yancey finished thirteenth on the money list with $110,405 and he averaged 71.74 strokes per round in the 31 tournaments he entered. Art Wall won $18,940.06 in 22 tournaments. Wall was one of four players on the PGA Tour Policy Board.

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1971 - The Section champion Marty Furgol, started the year right by finishing eighth with a score of 296 at the PGA Seniors’ Championship. The tournament was played in late January at the PGA National Golf Club. Julius Boros won by three strokes over Tommy Bolt (288) with rounds of 73, 69, 71 and 72 for a three under par 285. Sam Snead was next with a 289 and Chandler Harper finished fourth at 290. First prize was $4,000 and Furgol won $850. Henry Williams, Jr. (307), the professional at the Berkleigh Country Club, tied for 28th and won $222. Skee Riegel (311) tied for 39th and won $110. Bob Hendricks (313) won the last money of $83.33 for a tie for 46th.

The PGA Championship was held in the early part of the year for first time since it began in 1916. The tournament was played at the PGA National Golf Club at the end of February. Philadelphia Section pros Bert Yancey, Marty Furgol and Dick Smith, Sr. were in the field. Yancey was exempt off the PGA Tour money list, Furgol had an exemption as the Section champion and Smith got in through his finish at the PGA Club Professional Championship. Jack Nicklaus began with two 69s and added a 70 and a 73 to lead from wire to wire. Nicklaus (281) finished two strokes in front of Billy Casper (283) and three ahead of Tommy Bolt (284). Miller Barber and Gary Player tied for fourth with 285s. Nicklaus had now won each of the four majors at least twice. The purse was $202,440 and first prize was $40,000. Yancey (291) tied for 22nd and won $2,088. Furgol and Smith missed the cut.

Ninety-seven Section members and apprentices attended the Section’s spring meeting at the Westover Golf Club on the first Monday in April. Atlantic City Country owner and the honorary president of the PGA Leo Fraser reported on the affairs of the PGA of America. The Section members were given the details concerning the newly created pension plan. The tournament chairman, Dick Hendrickson, presented the tournament schedule for the year. Hendrickson announced that LeChateau Inn & Country Club would be hosting the Section Championship and adding $2,500 to the purse. Again C. Schmidt and Sons was the major sponsor of the Section’s tournaments. Seven events sponsored by Schmidt Beer were on the schedule with a total of $21,500. There was a new tournament also sponsored by Schmidt called the Maiden Race. It was for professionals who did not win a total of $300 in the Section Championship, Prior Festival and Philadelphia Open. The Section was still a co-sponsor to the J. Wood Platt Caddy Scholarship Fund. A pro-am was on the schedule for May that was expected to raise $4,000 for the scholarship fund.

Art Wall and Bert Yancey were in the Masters Tournament field at the Augusta National Golf Club in the second week of April. Charles Coody (279) opened up with a 66 in the first round and tacked on three steady rounds of 73, 70 and 70 to win the green jacket by two strokes. Jack Nicklaus and Johnny Miller tied for second at 281. Don January and Gene Littler tied for fourth with 283s. Wall and Yancey started with 71s but Yancey missed the cut and Wall wasn’t in contention. Wall (293) finished tied for 27th and won $1,750. First prize was $25,000.

The Section’s annual spring golf show was at the Marriott Motor Hotel in Bala Cynwyd on the last Tuesday of April. Admission was $1.50. The guest celebrities were Art Wall, the LPGA’s Peggy Kirk Bell and trick shot artist Paul Bumann from the Georgia PGA Section. The golfing public had their swings analyzed and photographed by the golf professionals. The golf show was followed by an awards dinner. Past president of the PGA of America Leo Fraser and Helen Wilson were honored for their contributions to golf. Wilson had won numerous Philadelphia championships and she owned a restaurant, which had hosted several of the Section’s meetings in the 1940s. Former Philadelphia Eagles star and TV sports commentator Tom Brookshier was the toastmaster for the dinner. Tickets to the dinner were $20.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Central Pennsylvania was at the Hershey Country Club on the last Monday of May. Amateur Ed Anewalt (143) led 83 pros and amateurs with rounds of 67 and 76. Jeff Steinberg opened with a 75 but he came back with seven birdies in the afternoon to post a four under par 69. That put him in the second spot with a 144. John Abernethy opened up with a 70 in the morning round and finished third with a 147 total. Mike Swisher, Phillip Aldrige, an assistant at the Carlisle Country Club, amateur Art Brunn and non-PGA pro Andy Stofko tied for fourth with 148s. Charlie Gilbert and a future Section member, amateur Bobby Huber, tied for eighth at 150. Don Stough, Frank Kiraly, from the Tri-State PGA Section, and amateur Ned Walker were next with 151s. Jimmy Johnson, the professional at the Range End Golf Club finished alone in the thirteenth place with a 152. Clark George, the professional at the Centre Hills Country Club, won the last spot in a two-hole playoff after tying for fourteenth with a 153.

Art Wall also passed a local qualifying test for the U.S. Open on the last Monday of May. Wall led the qualifying in Dallas, Texas at the Northwood Club and Las Colinas Country Club with a 69 and a 71. His 140 total was two under par. The Dallas Open had just finished up there on Sunday so a large number of touring pros were qualifying at that site.

The next day U.S. Open local qualifying for the Philadelphia area was at the Rolling Green Golf Club and The Springhaven Club. The U.S. Open was being played at the Merion Golf Club, which generated a larger entry than usual and the USGA had granted Philadelphia more qualifying spots. There were 155 pros and amateurs entered and 26 of them would earn the right to move on to the sectional qualifying in early June. John Kennedy came home from the PGA Tour to qualify and he put together two solid rounds in swirling winds of 71 and 70 for a 141 that led by four strokes. Wilmington amateur Bill Harmon who was runner-up in the 1968 USGA Junior Amateur Championship finished second with a 145. Bob Ross, Pete Trenham and Dick Smith, Sr. earned the right to move on with 146s. Willie Scholl finished alone in sixth place at 147. The next two spots went to amateurs Jay Sigel and Ted Mandes with 148s. Mike Reynolds, a professional and future Section member who grew up at Springhaven was alone at 149 and Buzz Garvin was next at 151. Jerry Pisano, now the teaching professional at the Edgmont Country Club, George Griffin III, the assistant to his father George at the Green Valley Country Club, Butch Sweigart, now the head professional at the Ingleside Manor Golf Club, Willie Maples, out of state pro Frank Boyd and amateur Robert McMahon tied for eleventh with 152s. There was an eleven-man playoff for the last ten spots at 153. The survivors were Bill Bishop, the professional at the Freeway Golf Club, Jack Connelly, the assistant at the Montgomeryville Golf Club, Ted McKenzie, Henry McQuiston, Bill Hackett, now the professional at the Delcastle Golf Club, Tony Perla, an assistant at the Merion Golf Club, Bob Schoener, Jr., Rolling Green amateur and future Section member Bob Toner along with two other amateurs Terry Sawyer and Harry Heffer. It took fourteen hours to complete the two rounds and the eleven-man playoff. Bert Yancey was fully exempt for having been one of the top 15 players on the PGA Tour the previous year and Mike Souchak was exempt from local qualifying.

On the first Monday of June Art Wall qualified for the U.S. Open in Atlanta with rounds of 71 and 70 for a 141. Wall tied for 12th. There were 39 spots there because the PGA Tour had been there the week before for the Atlanta Classic. Don Bies was the medalist with a 135 at the Atlanta Country Club a score of 145 passed the test.

Mike Souchak also qualified for the U.S. Open on the first Monday of June. Souchak earned his spot at Royal Oak, Michigan with a 72-71 for a 143. There were four spots there and Mike Hill was low with a 142. A score of 146 qualified.

The next day three professionals from the Philadelphia Section qualified for the U.S. Open at the Montclair Golf Club in New Jersey. Ted McKenzie shot the second lowest score at the site, a 74-69 for 143. Bob Ross and John Kennedy passed the test with 144s. Ross, Kennedy and McKenzie had qualified locally in Philadelphia. Keith Davidson led with a 141and it took a 145 to qualify.

The U.S. Open was back in the Philadelphia Section for the first time in 21 years in mid June. The Merion Golf Club was hosting America’s most important golf tournament for the third time. The other two at Merion had been played in 1934 and 1950. The host professional was Bill Kittleman. Merchandising at tournaments, especially the majors, was becoming a big business and Kittleman had a profitable week selling U.S. Open merchandise from tented booths on the golf course. There were only two players in the field that had been at Merion in 1950, Dutch Harrison and Julius Boros. Everyone, including the players, thought that Merion was too short at 6,544 yards for the professional game of the 1970s but they soon found out differently. At the end of the regulation 72 holes Lee Trevino (70-72-69-69) and Jack Nicklaus (69-72-68-71) were tied at the top with even par 280s. In an 18-hole playoff on Monday Trevino established himself as one of the great players of his time by winning our Open for a second time. Trevino took the lead on the third hole and kept it the rest of the way shooting a 68 to Nicklaus’ 71. First prize was $30,000 from a total purse of $193,200. One member of the gallery on Monday was Johnny McDermott who had come within one stroke of winning three straight U.S. Opens from 1910 to 1912. McDermott was out on the course even through a rainstorm that passed over during the front nine. Bob Rosburg and Jim Colbert tied for third at 282. Bert Yancey, who lived only a few blocks from Merion, was the low pro from the Philadelphia region. He tied for 9th at 285 and won $3,325. The entry fee was $25. John Kennedy, Ted McKenzie, Bob Ross, Art Wall and Mike Souchak missed the cut.

The British Open was played in early July at the Royal Birkdale Golf Club. Lee Trevino (278) won with rounds of 69, 70, 69 and 70. Trevino became only the fourth golfer to hold both Open titles in the same year. Bert Yancey finished ninth with a 285.

The fifth annual Prior Golf Festival was played in the fourth week of July. Play was over four different courses teaming up two pros with two amateurs at the first three courses. The purse was $18,100 with the largest part going to the pros for their individual scores. Dick Smith, Sr. began on Thursday with a 70 at the Brookside Country Club in Pottstown, which put him in a three-way tie for first. In the second round at the North Hills Country Club he tacked on a 71 for a two-stroke lead. Saturday was a day off. On Sunday Smith played the Little Mill Country Club in a two over par 73 but he picked up strokes on most of the field to finish the day with a six-stroke lead. On Monday Smith posted a 71 at his home course, the Hi-Point Country Club, to win by eight strokes with a total of 285. His 71 was the only sub-par round of the day. First prize was $3,000. Bob Ross finished second at 293 and won $1,700. Dick Hendrickson, Bob Schoener, Jr. and the defending champion Jack Kiefer, now the teaching pro at the Meadia Heights Golf Club, tied for third with 295.

The Philadelphia Section’s greatest golfer, Johnny McDermott, was at Hi-Point to witness the final round on fourth Monday of July and on Saturday he died peacefully in his sleep. His two sisters who drove him to the golf courses told the press that you might say that he died with his spikes on.

Ted McKenzie won the Philadelphia Open in a playoff with Henry McQuiston. The tournament was played in early August at the Aronimink Golf Club where McKenzie had been an assistant from 1962 to 1966. McKenzie (140) put together two rounds of even par 70 and McQuiston (140) led the first day with a 69 and then posted a 71. In the playoff McKenzie began with a double bogey on the first hole, but he played solid golf after that to win by six strokes as he posted another 70. Amateurs Jay Sigel, a future Section member, and Bucky Erhardt, a former Section member, tied for third with 142s. Jack Kiefer and Don Stough tied for fifth at 143.


Jack Kiefer
Won the 1971 Pennsylvania Open
Won New Jersey Open three times

On the second Tuesday of August Jack Kiefer won the Pennsylvania Open in a sudden-death playoff over Willie Maples. The tournament was played at the Hershey Country Club. Kiefer (72-74) and Maples (72-74) had finished tied with even par 146 scores when Maples bogied the last hole. A new clubhouse had been built on a different site at Hershey so the last hole was no longer a par 3 and the first hole was now a 434-yard dogleg to the right. The playoff started on the first hole and when Maples’ tee shot ended up under a tree Kiefer’s par wrapped up the title. First prize was $1,000 and second was $750. There was a three-way tie for third place at 147 among Dick Smith, Sr., Harold Sweigart and amateur Bobby Huber.

Sam Penecale and the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club hosted the IVB Golf Classic again in the third week of August. On Monday 106 golfers qualified for 35 spots in the tournament. None of the Section’s pros qualified but there were nine Section members in the starting field. Some were exempt players on the PGA Tour and the others had sponsor’s exemptions, which had been granted to the Section. The tournament boiled down to a battle between Tom Weiskopf and Dave Hill as Weiskopf led by three strokes entering the final round. Hill, who putted with his caddy crouching behind him on the line, made a charge in the last round with some early birdies. When Hill eagled the 17th hole he had caught Weiskopf but Weiskopf eagled the hole right behind him. Weiskopf bogied the last hole and edged out Hill by one stroke, tying the tournament record of 274. Weiskopf’s rounds were 67, 71, 66 and 70. Even though he missed a four-foot birdie putt on the last hole, Jack Nicklaus ended up third alone at 276, one stroke in front of George Knudson (277). Art Wall led the Section pros with his best finish at Whitemarsh. He finished with a 284, which earned him a tie for 16th and $2,325. Dick Smith, Sr. (285) holed out a bunker shot on the 72nd hole for his seventh birdie of the day. That gave him a 68 as he finished one stroke behind Wall in a tie for 18th and picked up a check for $1,533. Bert Yancey (290) tied for 44th, winning $423 and John Kennedy (292) won $214 for a 54th place tie. Marty Furgol, Henry McQuiston, Bob Schoener, Jr., Jack Kiefer and Dick Mullen, who was back in the Section as the professional at the Torresdale-Frankford Country Club, missed the cut. Attendance at the tournament was down sharply due to the U.S. Open having been at Merion in June, August dates and the economy. The PGA had offered the IVB the option of sitting out that year due to the U.S. Open being in Philadelphia but the tournament sponsors declined the offer.

On the fourth Monday of August the Section members qualified for the PGA Club Professional Championship at the Berkleigh Country Club. There were 33 players competing for seven places in the championship. George Griffin, Jr., the professional at the Green Valley Country Club, led with a score of 144. Dick Smith, Sr. finished second, two shots back at 146. Dave Collingwood, now the professional at the Oak Terrace Country Club and Stan Dudas tied for third with 147s. There was a four-way tie for the last three spots at 148 among John Abernethy, Bob Thatcher, Bob Schoener, Jr. and Willie Scholl. Scholl lost the playoff but he got into the tournament as an alternate when the Section champion Art Wall wasn’t eligible. Wall was ineligible because he had entered more than twelve tournaments on the PGA Tour in the past twelve months.

On the second Tuesday of September Gene Klein, the new professional at the Indian Spring Golf Club in Lancaster, put on a very successful tournament called the Dutch Open. Dean Beman, one of eight PGA Tour professionals in the field, took the first prize of $2,500 with a three under par 67. Don Stough and Charlie Sifford tied for second with 68s. The total purse was $13,000. Dan Sikes and Rafe Botts tied for fourth at 69. Doug Sanders would have finished high in the money but he didn’t putt out on the 18th green so that some of the local pros could get a larger piece of the prize money. He already had a guarantee from the tournament sponsor. Pete Trenham, Charlie Gilbert, Manufacturers Golf & Country Club assistant Steve Probst, Bob Batdorff, the professional at the Green Hills Golf Club and Steve Melnyk tied for sixth with 70s.

Marty Furgol tied for second at the U.S. National Senior Open at Las Vegas in late September. He finished tied with Pete Cooper and amateur Harvey Breaux at 284, five strokes behind the winner Tommy Bolt. It was Bolt’s fourth straight victory in that tournament. First prize was $7,500 and Furgol won $3,750. There were 139 professionals and 299 amateurs entered and the tournament was played over three courses. Furgol had to make a long journey home that night as he was defending his Section Championship title the next day at the Le Chateau Inn & Country Club in the Poconos. He also lost two hours off the clock crossing the country from west to east.


Art Wall
1971 Section Champion

The 50th annual championship of the Section was held at the Le Chateau Inn & Country Club at the end of September. The host professional was Stu Sirbaugh. The winner was Art Wall but it took an 18-hole playoff for him to pick up the Section title, his fifth. Wall trailed by two strokes after Monday’s round of 73 but a three under par 69 in the second round put him in front by one. In the third round former Section Champion Bob Schoener, Jr. turned in a 71 against a 72 for Wall and they were tied at 214. In the playoff on Thursday Schoener led after thirteen holes but Wall played the last four holes in three under par and finished with a 70 versus a 74 for Schoener. Wall’s check was for $1,500 and Schoener won 1,000 from the $8,800 purse. Le Chateau had added $2,500 to the purse. Wall’s 69 was the only round under 70 in the tournament. It was Wall’s first win of any kind in five years. Bob Ross put together a last round 70 to tie Don Stough for third at 216. After two days of cold, fog and mist the third day was sunny and the scoring was much better. Three strokes farther back Jerry Pisano, Dick Smith, Sr., Dick Mullen and Bob Hutnik tied for fifth with 219s. The defending champion Marty Furgol was never in contention after a first round of 74. He finished eleven strokes off the winning pace. The tournament committee had put him in the last pairing for the first round in order to give him a chance to get some rest from his all night trip across the country after finishing second in the U.S. National Senior Open.

PGA Tour qualifying was held at the PGA National Golf Club, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida in October. Twenty-three players earned cards. A future Section member, Billy Ziobro posted rounds of 76, 72, 75, 74, 72, and 74 for 443 to earn his playing privileges. Bob Zender led the qualifying with a score of 425.

In mid October the PGA Club Professional Championship was held at the Pinehurst Country Club. The #1 and #2 Courses were used for the first two rounds and the final 36 holes were played on the #2 Course. 59-year-old Sam Snead (67-65-74-69) posted a thirteen under par 275 and won by five strokes. Ron Letellier and Jerry Steelsmith tied for second at 280. Babe Lichardus, Stan Thirsk and Charles Volpone tied for fourth with 282s. Stan Dudas tied for 40th with a 293 and won $510. Bob Schoener, Jr. (296) tied for 61st and Bob Thatcher (299) tied for 77th. They each won the last money of $191.50. Dick Smith, Sr., Dave Collingwod, Willie Scholl, John Abernethy and George Griffin, Jr. missed the cut. First prize was $15,000 and the total prize money had been doubled to $100,000.


1971 Schmidt’s Challenge Cup Team
First winning visiting team gave Philadelphia a 3 to 2 lead
Back Row L-R—Perla, Ross, Smith, Hendrickson, Kiefer, McKenzie
Front Row L-R—McQuiston, Thatcher, Riegel, Schoener, Stough

In late October the ten-man Philadelphia Section team won the Schmidt’s Challenge Cup at the Hunt Valley Golf Club near Baltimore. It was the fifth year for the matches and for the first time the visiting team came away victorious. The first day made the difference as the teams of Henry McQuiston-Bob Thatcher, Tony Perla-Jack Kiefer and Bob Ross-Bob Schoener, Jr. won their better-ball matches and the Ted McKenzie-Don Stough team got a half. That put the Philadelphia team in front 3 ½ points to 1½ points. The second day Dick Smith, Sr., McKenzie, Perla and Stough won their singles matches and McQuiston and Ross got halves. The final tally was Philadelphia 8 ½ points to 6 ½ points for the Middle Atlantic Section. The other member of the team was Dick Hendrickson. Philadelphia now had three wins versus two losses in the challenge matches and led for the first time.


Dick Hendrickson
1971 "Golf Professional of the Year"
1972 Section Champion

Bob Ross was reelected president of the Section on the first Monday in November. The annual meeting was at the Atlantic City Country Club. Dick Hendrickson, who had been the secretary, was elected first vice president and Bob Thatcher moved from first vice president to secretary. Buzz Garvin was elected second vice president and Charlie Gilbert was reelected treasurer. Dick Smith, Sr. picked up the Johnny McDermott trophy as the "Player of the Year" in the Section and he won the DeBaufre Trophy with an average of 72.10 strokes per round. Dick Hendrickson was selected as the "Golf Professional of the Year". He was honored for the many hours he spent improving the tournament schedule and the effort he made in creating the first office for the Section. Bob Schoener, Jr. led the Schmidt’s points race.

The national PGA meeting was at Palm Beach Shores, Florida in the third week of November. The officers, President Warren Orlick, Secretary Bill Clarke and Treasurer Henry Poe were unanimously reelected. Negotiations to renew the lease with John D. MacArthur at PGA National were still going on. A price on green fees and carts had been settled but the major stumbling block was MacArthur’s desire to have the PGA Championship back at his course. A thirteenth district composed of the Florida and Georgia Sections was added. Philadelphia’s delegates to the meeting were Bob Ross and Charlie Gilbert.

Lee Trevino was the PGA "Player of the Year" and he won the Vardon Trophy with an average of 70.28 strokes per round. The leading money winner was Jack Nicklaus with $244,490. Bert Yancey finished 22nd with $80,364 and he was 15th in stroke average with an average of 71.41. Art Wall played in 24 tournaments and won $51,282. Tom Lynch played in five events and won $437.

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1972 - For the third straight year Marty Furgol played well in the PGA Seniors’ Championship finishing in a tie for fifth. He put together a four over par 292 at the PGA National Golf Club and won $1,137.50. Sam Snead (69-73-73-71) picked up his fifth PGA Seniors title with a 286 one stroke ahead of Tommy Bolt (287) and Julius Boros (287). Pete Cooper finished fourth at 291. First prize was $4,000 and the purse was $40,000. Skee Riegel tied for 25th at 304 and won $281. Billy Gilbert (308) finished in a tie for 34th and won $150. Overbrook Country Club professional Harlan Will (309) and Henry Williams, Jr. (309) tied for 39th, winning $106 each. Bob Hendricks (310) was next in a tie for 44th and he won $100.

The Section’s spring meeting was held at the Westover Country Club on the fourth Monday of March. The most ambitious tournament schedule in the history of the Section was presented to the professionals. First vice president and tournament chairman, Dick Hendrickson, had joined the PGA Tour. Section President Bob Ross announced that he had appointed Bill Kittleman to head up the tournament committee. Kittleman presented a schedule of 43 events of which 14 were open tournaments. In addition to that there was qualifying for the U.S. Open and the IVB Golf Classic. Ross reported that the Section had 425 members of which 265 were head professionals.

The Masters Tournament was played in the first full week of April as usual. In the first round Jack Nicklaus played six holes from #11 through #16 in six under par. He finished with a 68 and was never headed as he won his fourth Masters to put him even with Arnold Palmer. He played the last three rounds in 71, 73 and 74 for a 286 to win by three strokes. First prize was $25,000. Tom Weiskopf, Bruce Crampton and Bobby Mitchell tied for second with 289s. Gusty winds and slick greens were responsible for the high scoring. Bert Yancey tied for 12th at 292 and won $3,100. Art Wall missed the cut. Two professionals who had been working as assistants in the Section not long before were beginning to make a name for themselves in professional golf. Jerry McGee who had been at the Frosty Valley Country Club in the mid 1960s tied for fifth at 290 and Hubert Green, an assistant at the Merion Golf Club in 1970, tied for 22nd.

At the Masters Tournament the Golf Writers Association presented Leo Fraser with the Richardson Award. Fraser was cited for his many years of devotion to golf but especially for his initiative in resolving the split between the tournament players and the PGA.

On the Monday after the Masters the Philadelphia Section held its annual spring golf show at the Cherry Hill Inn. The show kicked off at noon with the pro-golf salesmen showing their wares, the professionals gave free instruction and Paul Bumann put on trick shot demonstrations. At 8:00 PM there was a dinner, which was attended by 350 Section members and their guests honoring George Fazio and past USGA President Phil Strubing. In the past decade Fazio had retired from competition and become one of the leading golf course architects in the country. Admission to the show was $1.50 and the price of both the show and the dinner was $20. More than 350 people attended the dinner.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Central Pennsylvania was at the West Shore Country Club on the fourth Monday in May. Mac Sartin, an assistant at the Hershey Country Club, was the medalist with rounds of 75 and 73 for a four over par 148. Charlie Gilbert and Jeff Steinberg tied for the second spot with 150s. Next in line were Hanover Country Club professional Ted Sheftic and Jack Kiefer, the teaching pro at the Airport Driving Range, with 151s. Howard Kramer and John Yoder, the professional at the Shade Mountain Golf Course, also qualified as they posted 152s. The eighth and last place went to Frank Kiraly in a three-man playoff that lasted two holes.

The next day local qualifying for the U.S. Open was held in the Philadelphia area. The players were competing for 16 places in the sectional qualifying rounds. There was a large field and play was over the St. Davids Golf Club and the Philadelphia Country Club. Ted McKenzie shot one of the low rounds, a one under par 70 at St. Davids in the morning. That along with an afternoon 74 at the Philadelphia Country Club sent him on the way to a tie for the medalist honors with Puerto Rico’s Manny Camacho at two over par 144. Skee Riegel (146) finished third and Willie Maples (147) finished fourth. There was a six-way tie for fifth as Alan Shankin, the assistant at the Ashbourne Country Club, Andy Thompson, the assistant at the Spring-Ford Country Club, Steve Probst, the professional at the Northampton Valley Country Club, Willie Scholl, John Toepel, an assistant at the Philadelphia Country Club, and amateur Buddy Marucci tied with 148s. Dennis Milne and Dick Hendrickson tied for tenth at 149. The next two spots went to Bill Kittleman and Bobby Mayes, who played out of the Tioga-Quaker City Club which was not attached to a golf course, with 150s. Ed Dougherty (151), an assistant at the Edgmont Country Club and Ken Peyre-Ferry (151), the assistant at the Indian Spring Country Club won the 14th and 15th spots in a five-man sudden death playoff. On one broke 70 in any round. Bert Yancey was exempt from both local and sectional qualifying off his finish in the U.S. Open the previous year.

Qualifying for the IVB Golf Classis was held on the first Monday of June at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club. There were 55 spots in the starting field to shoot for, which was the most in the ten-year history of the tournament. The large number of openings was due to the U.S. Open being in California the next week. A score of 75 made the grade and ten professionals from the Section passed the test. Jack Ewing led the qualifying with a 66. Jack Kiefer led the Section qualifiers with a 72 one stroke in front of Jack Connelly, who was now playing the PGA Tour and Marty Furgol who posted 73s. Willie Maples and Bob Hutnik were at 74. John Kennedy, Willie Scholl, Harold Sweigart, Dick Hendrickson and Tom Lynch, the assistant at the Philmont Country Club, got under the wire with 75s after being in a 17-man playoff for the last 16 spots. Dave Collingwood, who was now playing the PGA Tour, was the loser in the playoff but he got in as an alternate. Ted McKenzie, John Toepel, Henry Williams, Jr. and Bob Batdorff had qualified on the third Monday of May at North Hills in the Schmidt Summer Open. McKenzie had won the tournament.

The next day, a Tuesday, North Hills Country Club and the Philadelphia Cricket Club hosted the sectional U.S. Open qualifying. The qualifying was in Philadelphia because the PGA Tour was in town for the IVB Golf Classic. The sectional rounds were usually held in northern New Jersey. Jim Hardy and Dwight Nevil tied for the medal with 140s and each received a check for $200. The only one who passed the test from the Section was Dick Hendrickson who posted a 144. Hendrickson, who was now playing the PGA Tour, had qualified locally in Philadelphia. There were 21 spots and the players with 145s played off. The lone survivor of the sudden death playoff was future Section member Billy Ziobro, who won an eight-man playoff.

Whitemarsh Valley Country Club and their professional Sam Penecale hosted the IVB Golf Classic again. On Thursday 19 members of the Section teed off in the tournament. Along with the ten who had qualified on Monday there were nine more who were either exempt through the Section’s standings, sponsor’s exemptions or the PGA Tour’s exempt list. The highest score in the ten-year history of the tournament, a 282, took the top prize of $30,000. J.C. Snead (282), who was Sam Snead’s nephew, finished on top one stroke ahead of Chi Chi Rodriguez (283) with four steady rounds of 70, 71, 69 and 72. J.C. had worked for Chi Chi in Puerto Rico as his assistant during the winter six years before. Art Wall tied for ninth at even par 288 and won $3,900. Four shots farther back Bert Yancey (292) tied for 14th, winning $2,625 and Dick Hendrickson (295) picked up $1,190.63 for a 23rd place tie. John Kennedy, Ted McKenzie, Bob Ross, Dick Smith, Sr., Bob Hutnik, Marty Furgol, Jack Kiefer, Butch Sweigart, John Toepel, Dave Collingwood, Henry Williams, Jr., Jack Connelly, Willie Scholl, Tom Lynch, Willie Maples and Bob Batdorff missed the cut. Due to a lack of big name players in the field and a cold weekend the tournament suffered a drop in attendance as only 38,395 patrons showed up. It was a big drop off from the 63,000 the tournament drew only two years before in 1970. A ticket for the week with clubhouse privileges cost $25. ABC, channel 6, televised the tournament on Saturday from 6:30 to 7:30 pm and Sunday from 5:30 to 7:00 pm.

On Wednesday of the IVB Golf Classic there was a satellite tournament held at the Atlantic City Country Club for those who didn’t qualify. Jeff Voss came all the way from Dallas and he not only didn’t qualify he forgot to enter the IVB but he won at Atlantic City. He put together a three under par (35-33) 68 to win by three strokes on a windy day. Three Section members, Stan Dudas, Tony Perla, now the professional at the Sunnybrook Golf Club, and Don Stough who was now the professional at the Honey Run Golf Club tied for second at 71 with Bob Stone and Steve Spray. First prize was $2,060.

The next week the U.S. Open was played at the Pebble Beach Golf Links. For the first time, more than the last six holes at the Open were telecast. Because some of the spectacular ocean holes were in the middle of the round ABC decided to show the golf beginning with the fifth hole. On Sunday the telecast was extended to three hours. The Philadelphia Section had only two representatives. Jack Nicklaus opened with a one under par 71, which put him in a six-way tie for first. He followed it up with a 73 and he was still in a six-way tie at the top. In the third round Nicklaus shot a 73 to take a one-stroke lead. On Sunday Nicklaus put together a 74 in winds up to 35-mile-per-hour. On the 71st hole Nicklaus’s one-iron shot hit the flagstick and his tap-in birdie put him four strokes in front at 290. Bruce Crampton finished second three strokes back with a 293. Arnold Palmer was only one stroke out of the lead with four holes to play but fell back and ended up third alone at 294. Lee Trevino and Homero Blancas tied for fourth with 295s. Bert Yancey posted a 300 total to get a tie for 11th and $2,500. Dick Hendrickson (315) made the cut and tied for 67th, winning the $800 last money. Danny O’Neill, a future Central Pennsylvania professional also made the cut and finished at the end of the field that played all four rounds.

Lee Trevino won the British Open for the second year in a row. The Open was at Muirfield in the second week of July. Trevino’s 278 topped Jack Nicklaus by one and Tony Jacklin by two. Bert Yancey shot a 290 and tied for 19th.

Bert Yancey won the 150,000 American Golf Classic at Akron, Ohio in the third week of July. It was Yancey’s seventh win on the PGA Tour but his first in more than two years. He put together rounds of 69 68, 67 and 72 at the Firestone Country Club for a 276. That left him in a tie for first with Edison, New Jersey professional Tom Ulozas (273). Yancey won the $30,000 first prize with a par three on the first hole of a sudden death playoff. Hale Irwin posted a 277 for third place one stroke ahead of George Knudson (278).

The Schmidt’s Golf Festival, which had been named the Prior Golf Festival for three years, was played in the fourth week of July. The tournament was played over four courses on four days. The pros played with amateurs during the first three rounds but most of the $20,100 in prize money went to the individual scoring. Dick Hendrickson started out on Thursday with a 73 at the Chester Valley Golf Club and then posted a 71 at the Brookside Country Club near Allentown. After a day off on Saturday Hendrickson turned in a 70 at the Radley Run Country Club to move into third place but he trailed the leader by four strokes. The final round was played at the Aronimink Golf Club on Monday. Hendrickson didn’t take the lead until the back nine but then he pulled away. He turned in a 69 for 283 and won by four strokes over Tony Perla (287) who had had at least a share of the lead all three rounds. Dick Smith, Sr. finished third at 288 four strokes ahead of Ted McKenzie (292), Harold Sweigart (292) and Andy Thompson (292). First prize was $3,000 and second $1,900.


Dick Hendrickson
1972
Won Section Championship
Won Philadelphia Open
Won Schmidt’s Golf Festival

One week later Dick Hendrickson picked up another first place check by taking the Philadelphia Open title at the Heidelberg Country Club. A one over par 71 in the first round on Monday left Hendrickson in a five-way tie for fourth, three strokes off the pace. The field was cut to the low 50 and ties after the first round. It took a score of 77 to make the cut. On Tuesday Hendrickson shot the low round of the tournament, a 67, to finish four strokes in front of the field at 138. Four professionals, Pete Trenham, Howard Kramer, Don Stough and Alan Shankin tied for second with 142s. First prize was $600 and each of the pros that finished second won $345 from a total purse of $3,540.

The PGA Championship was held at the Oakland Hills Country Club in early August. Bert Yancey and Art Wall were the representatives from the Section. Yancey was exempt off his standing on the PGA Tour and his finish in the PGA the year before and Wall was in the field as the Section champion. Berwick, Pennsylvania native Mike Souchak had an exemption as the host professional. Gary Player (281) won the PGA for a second time with rounds of 71, 71, 67 and 72. Tommy Aaron and Jim Jamieson tied for second with 283s. Sam Snead, Billy Casper and Ray Floyd tied for fourth at 284. First prize was $45,000. Wall shot a 291, tied for 24th and picked up a check for $1,800. Yancey (292) and Souchak (292) both finished one stroke behind Wall in a tie for 29th and they each won $1,497.

The Hershey Country Club hosted the Pennsylvania Open again on the third Monday in August. Andy Thompson led by two strokes after the first day with a four under par 69. Thompson (143) came back on Tuesday with a steady 74 to win by two strokes over Ted McKenzie (145). Amateur Jay Sigel finished third at 146. Jeff Steinberg and Vern Novak, the assistant at the Edgmont Country Club, tied for fourth with 147s.

The Section Championship was hosted by the Tamiment Resort and Country Club in the third week of September. The host professional was Vince Yanovitch. Not since the 1929 Section Championship when George B. Smith won at the Bala Golf Club had the final outcome hinged on an interpretation of the rules and this was just as complicated and drawn out. In the first round Dick Smith, Sr.’s caddy moved his ball on the 16th hole. When Smith saw that the ball had been moved, the caddy stated that it had been an accident, so Smith decided to replace the ball. At that time the rule was that if the ball was moved accidentally there was a penalty of one stroke and the ball would be played from the spot where it now lay. Since Smith had lifted a ball that was in play the penalty for that was two strokes. There was much discussion by the members of the tournament rules committee as to whether a player could be penalized twice for what seemed to be one infraction and at one point the USGA agreed that he could not. Skee Riegel, the Section’s long time rules chairman, maintained that there could be a three-stroke penalty and that is what it was. On day one Smith had shot a 73 and a 74 was posted after a penalty of one stroke was accessed. On day two the penalty was increased to two strokes and Smith tacked on a two under par 70. In the third round Smith posted a 70 but after the completion of the round he was informed that the penalty from the first day would be three strokes. Riegel had finally been able to reach P.J. Boatwright, executive director of the USGA and the authority on the rules of golf in the United States. Boatwright concurred with Riegel that the penalty had to be three strokes and Smith could be disqualified for having played his ball from a wrong place. Boatwright also stated that the tournament’s rules committee had the power to waive the disqualification. The members of the rules committee all agreed that Smith should not be disqualified as he was only trying to correct a mistake made by his caddy. Smith’s score was now 76-70-70 for a 216 total. In the meantime Dick Hendrickson, who was playing the PGA Tour now, had flown into Philadelphia from St. Louis where he had missed the money on Sunday. He rented a car and drove to Tamiment and shot a 68, which took the first round lead by three strokes. Hendrickson then shot a 72 in the second round to take what appeared to be a five-stroke lead, and turned out to be six, into the final round. A 76 in the final round left him in a tie with Smith, who had been his assistant in 1965. There was an 18-hole playoff but due to scheduling conflicts it wasn’t played until fourteen days later. In the playoff Hendrickson, who had finished second in the Section Championship seven times, never trailed. He put together a 73 against a 75 for Smith to win by two strokes. Hendrickson picked up a check for $2,000. The tournament was co-sponsored by C. Schmidt and Sons and the total purse was $12,000. Bob Ross shot 220 and finished third one stroke ahead of Tony Perla (221). Roger Stern, the professional at the Schuylkill Country Club, Henry Williams, Jr., and Dennis Milne tied for fifth at 223. A program book produced by Bill Kittleman helped to increase the purse.

Qualifying for the PGA Club Professional Championship was held during the Section Championship. The standings at the completion of the second round among those who had entered the Club Pro determined the qualifiers. The two leaders after 36 holes, Dick Smith, Sr. and Dick Hendrickson along with Art Wall, who was in ninth place, weren’t eligible, as they had entered more than twelve tournaments on the PGA Tour in the last twelve months. The leaders among the qualifiers were Bob Ross and Tony Perla with 146s. Stan Dudas, Dennis Milne and Henry Williams, Jr. made it with ease at 148. After that came Billy Gilbert and Bob Schoener, Jr., with 149s. Roger Stern and John Abernethy posted 150s. The last spot went to Willie Scholl who finished with a 151. The Section had been allotted ten spots in the championship plus one for the Section champion, but when Hendrickson who wasn’t eligible won the Section Championship, that spot went to Jimmy Johnson who was next in line at 152.

The PGA Club Professional Championship was at the Pinehurst Country Club again. The tournament was played on Pinehurst #1 and #4 courses in the third week of October. Another former touring pro, Don Massengale, took the title with a last nine 33 that was played in record low temperatures produced by an artic cold front. Massengale’s rounds were 72, 66, 74 and 68 (280). Bob Bruno (282) finished second two strokes back and two strokes in front of Sam Snead (284), who finished third. Ernie George and Babe Lichardus were fourth with 285s. Bob Schoener, Jr. tied for 31st at 294 and won $825. Willie Scholl (295) finished one stroke back of that in a tie for 35th and picked up $660. Dennis Milne also made the cut and he tied for 61st winning the last money of $204.54. Jimmy Johnson, Stan Dudas, Bob Ross, Henry Williams, Jr., Tony Perla, Roger Stern, John Abernethy and Billy Gilbert missed the cut.

The Schmidt’s Challenge Cup matches were played at the Hershey Country Club in late October. The teams had been expanded to 12 players with the addition of two seniors. The home team usually had some advantage since they knew the course better than the visiting team but Hershey had a new course that none of the pros from the Philadelphia Section had played either. The new course, called the East Course, had been designed by George Fazio. The first day there were six better-ball matches and each team won three of them. The winning Philadelphia teams were Jimmy Johnson- Henry Williams, Jr., Dick Smith, Sr.-Pete Trenham and Tony Perla-Stan Dudas. The next day there were twelve singles matches and each team won six of the matches. The Philadelphia winners were Williams, Johnson, Smith, Perla, Trenham and Alan Shankin. It had been agreed that the last match off the course would continue into a sudden-death playoff if the points were even. The last match was Art Waerig, the assistant at the Lu Lu Country Club, versus Jennings House of the Middle Atlantic Section. Waerig had lost his match but he won the playoff on first extra hole and that extended the Philadelphia Section’s lead in the matches to four wins against two losses. The addition of the two seniors, Williams and Johnson, carried the day for Philadelphia as they won all three of their points. The other members of the team were Ted McKenzie, Bob Ross, Bob Schoener, Jr. and Jeff Steinberg.

In early November John D. MacArthur notified the PGA that he was terminating their lease on the office space at the PGA National Golf Club, which had an expiration date of December 31, 1974. The PGA had been leasing the space for $40,000 a year since late 1962 when negotiations fell through for the ownership of the property. Originally the PGA was to build the clubhouse and office for $1-million in return for the gift of a 36-hole golf course. The courses had been designed by Dick Wilson and were the equal of any courses in Florida. When the PGA couldn’t get clear title to some of the ground and there were problems with the sprinkler system they had walked away from the deal. MacArthur told the press that the PGA was not in violation financially but in spirit as they had been negotiating for a new headquarters elsewhere. Also MacArthur said that Frank Cardi was running for PGA president on the platform that the PGA would leave for a new site.

In mid November Bill Clarke was elected president at the PGA’s national meeting in Los Angeles. The runner-up in the election was Frank Cardi. Henry Poe was also opposed but he was elected secretary by a comfortable margin. There were six candidates for treasurer. The vote came down to Don Padgett and Joe Black with Padgett finally getting the majority. The delegates voted to suspend all negotiations with John D. MacArthur on the lease but Clarke said that he thought the difficulties with MacArthur could be worked out. The Philadelphia Section’s delegates were Bob Ross and Bob Thatcher.


Bob Ross
"Golf Professional of the Year"
1972

Henry McQuiston was elected president of the Section at the fall meeting on the third Monday of November. The meeting was held at the Atlantic City Country Club. Bill Kittleman was elected first vice president and Buzz Garvin was reelected second vice president. Charlie Gilbert moved to secretary and Don Siok, the professional at the Atlantic City Country Club, was elected treasurer. The night before the meeting there was an awards dinner honoring that year’s winners and there was a pro-pro tournament after the meeting. Bob Ross was selected as the "Golf Professional of the Year". As the president of the Section Ross had taken the spring golf show to a new level by adding a dinner to honor the outstanding golfers in the region. Dick Smith, Sr. had gone out on the PGA Tour with Dick Hendrickson in January, but by early spring he had returned to the Section for the life of a club pro and he took all of the playing honors. Smith was the "Player of the Year" in the Section and he won the DeBaufre Trophy with a stroke average of 72.00 per round. He was also the leader for the year in Schmidt’s points.

The leading money winner on the PGA Tour was Jack Nicklaus with $320,942 and Lee Trevino won the Vardon Trophy for a third consecutive year with a 70.89 stroke average. The PGA "Player of the Year" was Jack Nicklaus. Bert Yancey finished 29th with $73,374.91 in 34 tournaments. Art Wall won $36,461.35 in the 29 tournaments he entered. That put him in 61st place on the money list. The top sixty money winners on the PGA Tour were fully exempt for the next year. In spite of not being fully exempt Wall still had some exempt status due to past victories and money won during his career.

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1973 - In late January the PGA Seniors’ Championship was played at the PGA National Golf Club’s East and West Courses for the last time and it made history for another reason. It was Sam Snead in the winner’s circle again for the sixth time but this time he won by an amazing 15 strokes. Snead’s rounds on the East Course were 66, 66, 67 and 69 for a twenty under par 268. Julius Boros, who said that he thought he played well, finished second with a 283. That was two strokes lower than the score Boros had won with on the same course in 1971. First prize and the total purse were still $4,000 and $40,000. Joe Taylor finished third at 288. Ed Furgol and Milon Marusic tied for fourth with 290s. Henry Williams, Jr. made a very creditable showing finishing tied for 11th at 297, which was 29 strokes behind Snead. Williams won $637.50. Joe Kirkwood, Jr. (299) tied for 18th and won $487.50. Skee Riegel (301) and Marty Furgol (301) tied for 24th and they each won $292.50.


Henry McQuiston
Section President 1973 & 1974
At the Section’s spring meeting C. Schmidt & Sons announced that their sponsorship of the Challenge Cup matches was being dropped along with the yearlong points competition. The Schmidt brewery did add on the sponsorship of one more open tournament. Section President, Henry McQuiston, said that the officers were trying to find a new sponsor for the matches. The meeting was held at the George Washington Motor Lodge in Plymouth Meeting on the first Monday in April.

Later that week at the Masters Tournament a Georgia native who had only two wins on the PGA Tour won his only major title. Tommy Aaron (283) opened with a 68, added a 73 and a 74 before ending with a 68 to edge out J.C. Snead (284) by one stroke. It would be his last win on the tour. Aaron won $30,000. Jack Nicklaus made eight straight birdies in the last round but the best he could do was a 66 and a tie for third with Peter Oosterhuis and Jim Jamison at 285. The tournament ended on Monday as Saturday was rained out. Art Wall and Bert Yancey made the cut. Wall tied for 37th with a 298 and won $1,675. Yancey (300) finished two strokes farther back in 51st place and won $1,600.

The spring golf show and awards dinner was at the Marriott Motor Inn on Philadelphia’s City Line Avenue. Held on the second Monday of April the show opened at noon with 50 pro-golf exhibitors. The featured guests were former PGA "Golf Professional of the Year" Bill Strausbaugh, trick shot artist Paul Hahn, the PGA’s director of education Dr. Gary Wiren and LPGA tour player Janet Caponi LePera. In the evening an awards dinner honored Art Wall and Llanerch Country Club member Dorothy Germain Porter a past winner of the Women’s U.S. Amateur. Wall wasn’t able to attend because of the rain out that pushed the Masters Tournament into a Monday finish. PGA of America Treasurer Don Padgett was also in attendance.

The Section’s spring seminar was held on the third Monday of April. Attendance at the seminar was mandatory for any apprentice who wanted to participate in the Section’s tournaments that year. The program coordinator was Buzz Garvin who spoke on how to upgrade your job. The president of Aldila Jim Flood spoke on the graphite golf shaft; Skee Riegel discussed the rules of golf and an accountant lectured on finances.

In mid May the PGA announced that its winter program of five tournaments was moving to the St. Lucie Hilton’s Saints and Sinners golf courses. Earlier in the year the PGA having failed to reach an agreement with John D. MacArthur had moved their offices to Lake Park, Florida.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Central Pennsylvania was at the Colonial Country Club on the third Monday in May. Don Stough won the medal on with a seven over par (76-73) 149 on a day that included high winds, chilly temperatures and intermittent rain. There were seven spots to shoot at for the 45 entries at Colonial. Bob Bourne, a former touring pro who was now the assistant at the Lancaster Country Club, Charlie Gilbert and Joe Stencik, the assistant at the Tamiment Resort & Country Club, all turned in 151s and tied for second. The next two spots went to Frank Kiraly with a 152 and Jimmy Taylor, the professional at the Blue Ridge Country Club, at 154. Jack Kiefer posted a 155 and won the last place in a three-man sudden death playoff.

The next day on Tuesday local qualifying for the U.S. Open in the Philadelphia area was held at the Rolling Green Golf Club and The Springhaven Club. Vern Novak (143), who was back from the PGA Tour for a few days, led the qualifying by three strokes with a 74 at Rolling Green and a 69 at Springhaven. There were 15 spots in Philadelphia and a total of 531 in the country. Dennis Milne qualified second with a 146 and amateur Buddy Marucci was next with a 147. Stan Dudas and amateur Allan Sussel tied for fourth at 148. Henry McQuiston and Jack Connelly, now the assistant at the Huntingdon Valley Country Club, posted 149s and tied for sixth. Next in line with 150 totals were Ed Dougherty, Bob Gleeson, who was now working in North Jersey along with amateurs Jay Sigel and Bucky Erhardt. Dick Hendrickson, Bob Thatcher, Joe Data, an assistant at the Philadelphia Country Club and Steve Probst posted 152s and survived a six-man playoff for the last four spots. Sixty players were exempt from local qualifying and thirty-three were fully exempt. Bert Yancey was fully exempt off his position on the PGA Tour money list and Art Wall was exempt from local qualifying.

In May Ted McKenzie won the Lavino Open at the Plymouth Country Club and also qualified for the IVB Golf Classic, which was being held in early June at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club. McKenzie put together a one under par 71 to win by one stroke over Henry McQuiston, Jimmy Taylor and Tom Mastroni, the assistant at the Meadowlands Country Club. First prize was $700. The Section members were competing for two places in the starting field at the IVB and for fourteen openings in the pre tournament qualifying round. McQuiston defeated Taylor on the third hole of a sudden death playoff for the other exemption into the IVB. As an apprentice, Mastroni wasn’t eligible for one of the Section’s two spots in the starting field.

Sectional qualifying for the U.S. Open was in Philadelphia at the Aronimink Golf Club and the Waynesborough Country Club on the first Tuesday of June. It was one of thirteen sectional qualifying sites in the country. Ralph Johnston led by two with a par 70 round at Aronimink in the morning and a two under par 70 at Waynesborough in the afternoon for 140. Two of the sixteen spots went to locals, Dick Hendrickson and Vern Novak. Hendrickson tied for third with rounds of 70 and 73 for 143 and Novak turned in a pair of 73s for 146. They had qualified locally in Philadelphia.

Art Wall qualified for the U.S. Open in Charlotte, North Carolina where there were 39 spots. Wall’s rounds at the Charlotte Country Club were 72 and 73 for a 145. Sam Snead and Fred Marti tied for medalist honors with 139s. The players with 146 scores played off for the last spots.

The IVB Golf Classic was played in early June the week before the U.S. Open. Sam Penecale and the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club hosted the tournament again. Qualifying was held on Monday as 101 pros and amateurs fought it out for 36 places in the tournament. Bobby Greenwood and Butch Baird were the low qualifiers with 67s. Bob Ross (72) made it easily and Bob Schoener, Jr. (74) survived a 16-man playoff for the last ten spots. Dick Smith, Sr., Dick Hendrickson, Skee Riegel, Tony Perla, Andy Thompson, now the assistant at the Radnor Valley Country Club and John Toepel had exemptions through the Philadelphia Section. Tom Weiskopf (67-71-65-71) won the IVB and for the second time in three years as he tied the tournament record of 274. Jim Barber (278) finished second four strokes back. Johnny Miller and Forrest Fezler tied for third with 279s. There were twelve Section members in the starting field but only Bert Yancey made the cut and finished at 283. Yancey won $2,103 for a 16th place tie. First prize was $30,045. Weiskopf stayed at Yancey’s house the week of the tournament. Weiskopf’s extra $45 came about because when Lee Trevino withdrew only 69 players completed 72 holes. The 69 players split up the 70th place money. It was the third straight year that Trevino had withdrawn during the tournament. Thompson, Toepel, Smith, Ross, Hendrickson, Schoener, Ted McKenzie, Henry McQuiston, Perla, Riegel and Art Wall missed the cut. The Sunday attendance came to 18,875, which brought the total to a record of 64,081for the four days.

The next week the U.S. Open was at the Oakmont Country Club near Pittsburgh with its 187 bunkers. Several rainstorms during the tournament softened the greens and made the course easier than usual but the scores weren’t real low. After three rounds four players shared the lead at 210, three under par. Trailing by six strokes after rounds of 71-69-76, and teeing off an hour ahead of the leaders, Johnny Miller proceeded to make eight birdies and finish with a 63, the lowest score in the history of our Open. Miller (279) made it look easy but only three other players broke 70 on Sunday. The three other players who broke 70 that day were Lanny Watkins (65), Jack Nicklaus (68) and Ralph Johnston (68) who had been the low qualifier in Philadelphia. Several players could have won but in the end Miller finished one stroke in front of John Schlee (280). Tom Weiskopf finished third at 281 as Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus and Lee Trevino tied for fourth with 282s. Bert Yancey finished tied for 25th at 294 and won $1,382.50. Art Wall won $930 for a tie at 45th place. The prize money came to $219,400 and first place paid $35,000. Vern Novak and Dick Hendrickson missed the cut.

Bert Yancey (281) finished fifth in the British Open, five strokes back of his friend Tom Weiskopf who won with a twelve-under-par 276. Weiskopf overcame the Open’s usual wind and rain to post rounds of 68, 67, 71 and 70. First prize was $14,300. The Open was played at Troon Golf Club in the second week of July. Johnny Miller and Neil Coles tied for second at 279. Jack Nicklaus shot a 65 in the last round and finished fourth alone at 280. Yancey won $6,370 and his 281 total was five strokes better than the next player in line. Only six players finished under par for the tournament.

The Schmidt’s Golf Festival kicked off on the third Thursday of July at the Brookside Country Club in Pottstown and then moved to the Coatesville Country Club on Friday. After a day off on Saturday the tournament shifted to the Sunnybrook Golf Club and it finished up with the fourth round played at the Hidden Springs Golf Club. Dick Hendrickson and Willie Scholl ended up in a tie for the top money at the end of the 72 holes with 287s. Hendrickson put together rounds of 72, 74, 69, 72 and Scholl’s rounds were 71, 73, 73 and 72. Six days later on Sunday there was an 18-hole playoff at Hidden Springs. Hendrickson, who had left the tour temporarily because of a bad back, won the playoff and a check for $3,000 with a 72 against a 76 for Scholl. The purse including pro-am money came to $23,175. Hendrickson had now won three of the seven Schmidt Festivals and had not finished lower than sixth. Hendrickson’s seven-year money total in the tournament now added up to $14,321. Scholl won $1,800. Andy Thompson finished third one stroke back at 288. Joe Data won the fourth place money with a 289 and Dick Smith, Sr. finished fifth at 292.

Two days after winning the Schmidt’s Festival Dick Hendrickson won the Philadelphia Open for a second straight year. The tournament was played at the Atlantic City Country Club over two days and the field was cut to the low 45 and ties after Monday’s round. Forty pros and eight amateurs made the cut with scores of 75 or better. Hendrickson put together rounds of 69 and 70 for a one under par 139. Andy Thompson finished second at 141 two strokes in front of Tony Perla (143) and George Griffin III (143). Hendrickson won $650 and Thompson $526 from a total purse of $3,721.

In mid August the PGA Championship was played at the Canterbury Country Club near Cleveland. Jack Nicklaus won the PGA for a third time, which gave him twelve wins in the majors eclipsing the former leader Walter Hagen. Counting his two wins in the U.S. Amateur he was now ahead of Bobby Jones as well. Nicklaus (277) started slowly with a 72 and then he tacked on rounds of 68, 68 and 69 to win by four strokes over Bruce Crampton (281). Lanny Watkins, J.C. Snead and Mason Rudolph tied for third at 282. First prize was $45,000. Bert Yancey tied for 24th with a 287 and won $1,774.16. Three strokes farther back Dick Hendrickson (290) tied for 35th and picked up $1,054.44. Hendrickson was in the field as the Philadelphia Section champion and Yancey was exempt off his status on the PGA Tour money list.


Tony Perla
Won 1969 Pennsylvania Open
Won 1973 Pennsylvania Open

Tony Perla picked up his second Pennsylvania Open title at the Oakmont Country Club in the third week of August. Because the tournament was at Oakmont more than 300 pros and amateurs were entered and after several lengthy rain delays Monday’s round was scrapped. Enough contestants either didn’t show up or withdrew so the committee sent the players off in two shotgun starts on Tuesday. With nearly 288 players left play was in fours and two groups had to begin play on each hole. The morning pairings teed off at 7:00 and needed six hours to complete the round. The afternoon players teed off at 2:00 and finished at dark. The field was then cut for the second round on Wednesday. The field was cut to 40 and ties, a reduction from the planned number of 60, so the members could get on their course. Perla (144) put together two par rounds of 72 and edged out amateur Ron Milanovich (145) by one stroke. First prize was $1,200. Milanovich shot the only sub-par round, a 71 in the first round. Allegheny Country Club professional Roy Vucinish ended up in third place alone with a score of 149. Two former Pennsylvania Open champions Bob Ross and Roland Stafford tied for fourth along with Tom Lynch and amateur John Birmingham at 151.


Joe Data
1973 Section Champion

Joe Data, playing in his first Section Championship, came away the winner over John Kennedy. North Hills Country Club and Ron Rolfe hosted the tournament in the first week of October. The defending champion, Dick Hendrickson, wasn’t able to defend his title due to a bad back. Data started out on Monday with a two under par 69 and took a two-stroke lead. In the second round he posted another 69 and opened up a five-stroke lead. Data (209) put together a conservative 71 in the last round to win by four strokes. There were only three scores under 70 and Data had two of them. Data picked up $1,700 from the $9,000 purse and Kennedy (213) won $1,100. Dick Smith, Sr. finished third at 216 two strokes in front of Art Wall (218). There was a three-way tie for fifth at 219 between Bob Ross, John Carson and Stan Dudas. In order to boost the purse the Section under the chairmanship of Bill Kittleman hired a salesman to sell ads and publish a program book.

Dick Hendrickson shot a last round 63 at the Insurance City Open on the first Sunday of September. His eight under par 63 gave him a 72-hole score of 273 and left him nine strokes behind the winner Billy Casper (264). Hendrickson tied for 28th and won $1,244. Art Wall finished with a 270, tied for 16th and won $2,800. The total purse was $200,000 and first prize was $36,000.

Qualifying for nine places in the PGA Club Professional Championship was held during the first two rounds of the Section Championship. The medalist was Joe Data (138) who turned in a pair of 69s. Skee Riegel and Bob Schoener, Jr. were next with 145s, one stroke ahead of Stan Dudas (146) and Dick Smith, Sr. (146). John Carson finished sixth with a 147 and Dennis Milne won the seventh spot with a 148. Bob Thatcher posted a 150 to pick up the ninth spot and Henry McQuiston got under the wire at 151. When Data won the Section Championship he received the Section champion’s exemption so Willie Scholl, who had been the first alternate with a 152 score, was added to the starting field. The ones who finished ahead of them either weren’t eligible or choose not to enter. John Kennedy and Art Wall weren’t eligible because they had played in more than twelve tournaments on the PGA Tour in the past twelve months.

The PGA Club Professional Championship was played at the Pinehurst Country Club in mid October. Three of Pinehurst’s courses were used, #2, #3 and #5. A Texan, Rives McBee (73-67-71-71), won by three strokes over former Green Valley Country Club assistant Stan Brion (285) with a score of 282. Don Massengale and John Molenda tied for third with 286s. Dick Smith, Sr. (295) tied for 21st and qualified for the PGA Championship while winning $1,121.82. Dennis Milne (302) tied for 83rd and won the last money of $236. Willie Scholl, Joe Data, Bob Thatcher, Henry McQuiston, Skee Riegel, Stan Dudas, Bob Schoener, Jr. and John Carson missed the cut.

In the fourth week of October a future Section member, Jim Masserio, earned playing privileges on the PGA Tour. Qualifying was held at the Perdido Bay Country Club in Pensacola, Florida and the Dunes Golf Club in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. For that final qualifying stage the players played the first four rounds in Pensacola and then drove several hundred miles to South Carolina for the final four rounds. Masserio tied for 14th with rounds of 74, 76, 70, 74, 72, 75, 70 and 72 for a 583 total. It was Masserio’s third attempt to qualify for the PGA Tour. Twenty-three players earned cards as Ben Crenshaw led the qualifying by a record 12 strokes with a total of 558.

After C. Schmidt & Sons dropped its sponsorship of the team matches between the Philadelphia Section and the Middle Atlantic Section the two Sections attempted to find a new sponsor. They were not able to locate a new sponsor and the matches weren’t played for two years.


Harlan Will
"Golf Professional of the Year"
1973

The fall meeting and election of officers was held at the George Washington Motor Lodge in Plymouth Meeting on the third Monday of November. The President, Henry McQuiston, and all of the other officers were reelected. The first vice president and the second vice president were Bill Kittleman and Buzz Garvin and the secretary and treasurer were Charlie Gilbert and Don Siok. Harlan Will was honored as the "Golf Professional of the Year". Will had been a head professional and a Section member for forty years. He was a Section officer nine years and the Section’s tournament chairman for nine years. There was a tie for the "Player of the Year" between Dick Smith, Sr. and Dick Hendrickson. Smith won the DeBaufre Trophy with a stroke average of 72.57 and he led the challenge points race with 92 points. Hendrickson was second with 86.33 points. Due to being on the PGA Tour most of the year Hendrickson only entered twelve of the local events, but he either won or tied for first in nine of them.

In mid November Henry McQuiston and Charlie Gilbert attended the national PGA meeting in Dallas, Texas as the delegates from the Philadelphia Section. President Bill Clarke and the other officers Henry Poe and Don Padgett were reelected without opposition. The delegates made sweeping revisions of the member classifications for the purpose of simplification. There were now three groups. There was the Active—Class A-Head Professionals, Class Junior A-Assistant Professionals; Inactive—anyone not in the active group and Life Member, which was anyone who had been a PGA member for more than 25 years and didn’t fall into the Active class. Also graduates of two-year colleges were given four credit months toward membership since graduates of a four-year college already received eight credit months.

In early December the Fairmount Park Commission announced that it was closing Cobbs Creek and the other five city golf courses for the months of January and February to save money on fuel. The price of gas and oil had more than doubled since the beginning of the year.

For the third year in a row the leading money winner on the PGA Tour was Jack Nicklaus with $308,362 and he was selected as the PGA "Player of the Year". The Vardon Trophy was won by Bruce Crampton with a 70.57 stroke average. Bert Yancey played in 30 tournaments and won $66,394.38 which was good for 39th place on the money list. Art Wall got into 25 tournaments and won $29,822.69 which left him 84th on the money list. Jeff Steinberg played in five tournaments and won $205.

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1974 - The PGA was in the midst of legal negotiations with their landlord at Palm Beach Gardens, John D. MacArthur. The discussions were over the lease of the office space in the clubhouse and the fees that the PGA members would be paying for carts and golf. The PGA Seniors’ Championship along with the other winter activities found a temporary home at Port St. Lucie, Florida.

In late January Joe Data won the PGA Match Play tournament during the winter program at the Port St. Lucie Country Club. Data defeated Wisconsin’s Dennis Tiziani in the 36-hole final 4 & 3, winning $1,900. Data picked up another $600 for using a golf ball manufactured by one of the tournament’s sponsors. To reach the finals Data had to defeat six other professionals. One of those was former Section member Stan Brion, who Data defeated in the semi-finals 1-down with the help of a 35-foot putt that he holed for a birdie on the last green.

In early February Roberto De Vicenzo won the PGA Seniors’ Championship with a 15 under par (68-68-71-66) 273 at the Port St. Lucie Country Club. De Vicenzo was the first non-resident of the United States to take the title. Art Wall, playing in his first Seniors’ Championship tied Julius Boros for second at 276. Sam Snead finished fourth at 279. First prize from the $40,000 purse was $4,000 and the runner-ups each picked up checks for $2,500. The club pros from the Section made a good showing. Marty Furgol (289) tied for 11th, winning $650. Billy Gilbert (292) tied for 20th and won $500. Bob Hendricks (298) finished in a tie for 41st and won $100.

The Section’s annual spring meeting was at the Sheraton Valley Forge Hotel in King of Prussia on the second Monday of April. The meeting was in the morning and Section’s annual spring golf show kicked off at noon. Bill Kittleman announced a policy for the Section’s one-day open tournaments. In order to make it easier for the press to cover the tournaments the higher ranked players in the Section would be given late starting times. That way the winners would be around to speak to press when the tournament came to a conclusion. The Section members elected their Secretary Charlie Gilbert to the office of national vice president for District II. Gilbert had been an officer in the Section for four years, had attended three national meetings and he was a member of the national PGA long range planning committee. He would take office at the annual meeting in the fall and represent District II, which was comprised of the New Jersey, Metropolitan and Philadelphia Sections. The term of the national vice president, later called District Director, was for three years. The Section President Henry McQuiston called on Kittleman, who was the first vice president and tournament chairman to take on the duties of secretary as well so that Gilbert could become acclimated to the national PGA affairs.


Henry McQuiston, Dave Marr, Dick Farley, Harry Obitz
Philadelphia Section Spring Golf Show 1974
Marr’s father was a golf professional and learned the game
as a caddy at the Philadelphia Country Club

The Philadelphia Section’s 17th annual Spring Golf Show was held on the second Monday of April at the Sheraton Valley Forge Hotel in King of Prussia. The show was held under the direction of Philmont Country Club assistant Bob Intrieri and Section President Henry McQuiston. The guest celebrities were former PGA champion Dave Marr and LPGA star Carol Mann. Marr and Mann hit shots with Wiffle Balls and answered questions about the golf swing. Harry Obitz and Dick Farley put on their "Swings the Thing" show along with Georgia professional Paul Bauman displaying his array of trick shots Obitz, Farley and Marr donated their appearance fees to the PGA for its Junior World International tournament in San Diego. The Section’s members supplied free instruction as the public hit golf balls into nets. The show ran from noon to 9:30pm and the admission fee was $1.50.

The Masters Tournament ended on the second Sunday of April with Gary Player getting fitted for a second green jacket. A 66 in the third round and a nine-iron shot that stopped inches from the cup on the 71st hole gave Player (278) a two-stroke victory. Players’ rounds were 71, 71, 66 and 70. Tom Weiskopf and Dave Stockton tied for second with 280s. Jack Nicklaus, Hale Irwin and Jim Colbert tied for fourth with 281s. In the first round Art Wall discovered some of his magic from the 1959 Masters. Playing in his 17th Masters at the age of 50 Wall played holes number 2 through 6 in five under par. That run included a two on the fifth hole where he holed out a #4 wood. Wall (291) finished with a 70 and went on to win $1,775 for a tie for 37th. Wall was the only invitee from the Philadelphia Section.

On the fourth Monday of April the spring education seminar drew a record attendance. Guest speakers lectured on accounting and finance. Leo Fraser spoke on the national PGA and what it is doing for the golf professional. Leo McNamara from the Wilson Sporting Goods Company gave a slide show and talked on the evolution of golf and golf equipment. McNamara was well versed in the history of golf. He was the son of Tom McNamara, a pro golf salesman who won the Philadelphia Open in 1914 and 1915 while covering the New England territory for Wanamakers.

In May Henry McQuiston won the Lavino Open at the Sunnybrook Golf Club. McQuiston posted a one under par 71 and then chaired a Section board meeting. Later in the day Joe Data put another 71 on the scoreboard to gain a tie for first. McQuiston came out of the board meeting and made a par on the first hole of a playoff to pick up a check for $950 and an exemption into the IVB Golf Classic. Data already had an exemption as the Section champion. Eight players finished in a three-way tie for third and a second spot in the IVB. Ron Rolfe won a play off on the next Monday for that second spot. The total purse was $5,200. Dick Hendrickson and Dick Smith, Sr. had two of the Section’s six exemptions as the leading performance point winners from the year before.

Dave Collingwood, who was now the professional at the Olde Hickory Golf Club, led the local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Central Pennsylvania. Qualifying was held at the par 72 Blue Ridge Country Club on the third Monday of May. Collingwood was around in 71 strokes in the morning round and he came back with a 74 in the afternoon for a 145 that won the medal by two strokes. The assistant at the Hershey Country Club, Bobby Huber and Bob Bourne tied for second with 147s. Bourne shot a 69 in the afternoon, which was the low round of the day. Tom Robertson, who was the teaching pro at Rabold’s Driving Range, was next with a 149. Local amateur Richard Hrip turned in a 150 and took claim to the fifth spot. Jerry Janeski, the assistant at the Susquehanna Valley Country Club, won the sixth spot with a 151. Mike Atkins (152), the professional at the Overlook Golf Club, won a five-man playoff for the seventh and last spot with a birdie on the second extra hole.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in the Philadelphia area was on the third Tuesday of May at the Woodcrest Country Club and the Tavistock Country Club. At age 58 amateur Billy Hyndman led the scoring with a 145, a three over par 74 at Woodcrest and a one over par 71 at Tavistock. Four players tied for second. John Kennedy now the head professional at the Edgmont Country Club, Tony Perla, Ed Dougherty, who was now on the PGA Tour, and amateur Jay Sigel all posted 147s. Jack Connelly, Ted McKenzie and Norm Hammer, the professional at the Warrington Country Club, were next with 148s. Bob Hibschman, the assistant at the Manufacturers Golf & Country Club, turned in a 149 and ended up alone in the ninth spot. Alan Shankin, the assistant at the Medford Village Country Club, and Andy Thompson, who was now on the PGA Tour tied for tenth with 150s. The twelfth and last spot went to Bobby Mayes with a total of 151. Mayes was a non-PGA African American pro who played out of the Tioga-Quaker club that had a clubhouse but no golf course. For over 20 years he had been winning checks around the country on the black tour. He beat out two other players in a sudden death playoff to secure his right to move on the next stage at the sectional level. Bert Yancey was exempt from local qualifying off his record on the PGA Tour.

On the first Tuesday in June sectional qualifying for the U.S. Open was held at the Aronimink Golf Club and the Rolling Green Golf Club. There were 75 players competing for 17 places in the Open. Canada’s George Knudson (138) earned medalist honors with a par 70 at Aronimink and a three under par round of 68 at Rolling Green. Bert Yancey finished second to Knudson with a 142. Bobby Mayes qualified with a 144. The players with 146 totals played off for the last three openings. It took almost 13 hours to complete the qualifying and playoffs with play finishing up in the moonlight at 8:55.

The IVB Golf Classic was played at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club in early June, the week before the U.S. Open. Qualifying was held on Monday for the 52 remaining places in the tournament. Ross Randall and Ben Kern were low with 67s. Six Philadelphia pros qualified with Bruce MacDonald leading the group at 69. Jack Connelly posted a 72. Pete Trenham, John Carson, Ed Dougherty and John Kennedy passed the test with 73s. The last spots went to the 74 shooters. When the IVB Golf Classic got under way on Thursday there were seventeen Section members in the starting field via Section exemptions, sponsor exemptions, qualifying or for having made the cut on the PGA Tour the week before. Hubert Green, who had been on Bill Kittleman’s staff at Merion four years before, set a tournament record on the way to winning the top check of $30,000. Green (271) picked up his third victory of the year with rounds of 70, 67, 66 and 68 that lowered the IVB record by three strokes. Hale Irwin finished four strokes back at 275. Johnny Miller and Tom Jenkins tied for third with 277s. Bert Yancey led the Philadelphia pros with a tie for 27th at 287 and won $1,065. Art Wall (291) finished four strokes farther back 46th place and won $424. Kennedy (295) and Andy Thompson (295) tied for 61st and each won $281. Henry McQuiston (300) finished 70th and won the last payoff, $225. In spite of a sizable turnout of 19,437 on Sunday the attendance for the four days was well below the record of the previous year. The host pro was Sam Penecale. Dick Smith, Sr., Connelly, Joe Data, Dick Hendrickson, Larry Wise, who was playing the PGA Tour, Tim DeBaufre, who was now the professional at the Woodcrest Country Club, Ron Rolfe, Dougherty, Carson, Tony Perla, MacDonald and Trenham missed the cut.

The week after the IVB the touring pros shifted over to New York for the U.S. Open at the Winged Foot Golf Club. A very difficult golf course was made even more difficult with hard and fast greens. When it was all over on Sunday evening Hale Irwin had won by two strokes with a seven over par 287. His rounds were 73, 70, 71 and 73. Forest Fezler finished second at 289. Bert Yancey and Lou Graham tied for third with 290s. Yancey was never really in contention after an opening round of 76. As many fell back in the last round a 72 moved Yancey into an $11,500 payday. First prize from the $223,900 purse was $35,000. Bobby Mayes missed the cut.

The eighth annual Schmidt’s Golf Festival was played in the third week of July. The tournament opened on a Thursday at the Berkleigh Country Club and then moved to the Torresdale-Frankford Country Club. Saturday was a day off. The third round was at the Edgmont Country Club and the tournament finished up across the Delaware River at the Medford Village Country Club. The tournament came down to Dick Smith, Sr. who was at the peak of his playing career and Ed Dougherty who was just beginning to realize his potential. With rounds of 71, 70 and a 69 at his home Edgmont course Dougherty led Smith by four strokes. In the final round on the 7,000 Medford Village course Smith produced the low round of the day, a one under par 71, to finish first with a 286. Smith’s four rounds were 71, 72, 72 and 71. Dougherty slipped to a 79 and finished second. First prize from the $20,000 purse was $3,000. Dougherty, who was headed for the PGA Tour in three weeks, won the largest check of his short career, $1,800. Dick Hendrickson maintained his record of having never finished worse than sixth in the Schmidt’s Festival by tying Ted McKenzie for third at 291. Dave Collingwood and Bob Bourne tied for fifth with 297s.

Joe Data won the Philadelphia Open played in late July at the Torresdale-Frankford Country Club but it took another six weeks to wrap up the title. On Monday Data shot the only par round, a 70, and led three players by one stroke. It took a score of 78 or better to make the cut for the second round. On Tuesday Bob Bourne put together the low round of the tournament, a 68, for 142. Data bogied the last hole and finished with a 72 and a 142 total as well. Due to conflicts in the player’s schedules the playoff wasn’t held until the second Sunday of September. In the playoff Bourne led by one stroke after 16 holes in spite of a triple bogie seven on the 8th hole. On the par three 17th hole Bourne had a short putt for a birdie and Data’s tee shot was buried in the face of the bunker but they halved the hole with pars. On the next hole Bourne made a bogie and Data holed an 18-foot putt for his only birdie of the day, which gave Data a 73 to Bourne’s 74. Dick Hendrickson (143) finished third one stroke back and one stroke in front of George Griffin III (144). Willie Scholl and John Poole, the professional at the West Chester Golf & Country Club tied for fifth at 146. First prize was $700.

The Pennsylvania Open was at the Merion Golf Club in early August and the same week as the PGA Championship. There were 102 pros and 75 amateurs entered. After the first round the field was cut to the low 60 and everyone who shot 81 or better made it. Jay Sigel, who had won the Pennsylvania Amateur earlier that year, won with a 73 and a 70 for 143. Bobby Huber, led the first day with a one over par 71, and finished second at 145. He picked up the $1,200 top check. The total purse was $4,625. Bob Thatcher, George Griffin III and Billy Hyndman, who posted a last round 67 that was the only sub-par round of the tournament, tied for third with 146s.

The PGA Championship was at the Tanglewood Country Club in North Carolina just two days after the Pennsylvania Open ended. Lee Trevino found an old putter in the attic of the house he was renting and used it for a one-stroke victory. He started slowly with a 73 and then shot 66-68 for a one-stroke lead over Jack Nicklaus. On Sunday Nicklaus shot a 69 and Trevino (276) matched it for his fifth win in a major. First prize was $45,000. Two professionals who had worked in the Philadelphia Section, Sam Snead and Hubert Green, tied with Dave Hill and Bobby Cole for third with 279s. Bert Yancey tied for 32nd at 290 and won $1,260. Dick Smith, Sr., who had qualified through the PGA Club Professional Championship and Joe Data, who was in the field as the Section champion, missed the cut. Yancey was exempt off his standing on the PGA Tour.

The Philadelphia Section PGA was paying the expenses for a boy and a girl to compete in the PGA’s Junior World International tournament in San Diego. The Section’s girl’s representative, Lori Nelson, from the Penn Oaks Country Club put together rounds of 75, 82, 74 and 79 to win the championship.

Qualifying for the PGA Club Professional Championship was held at the Plymouth Country Club on the third Monday of August. The Section members were qualifying for fourteen places in the starting field plus the Section Champion was exempt. John Carson was the medalist with two rounds of 69. His six under par 138 edged out Tim DeBaufre (139) by one stroke. Next in line were Skee Riegel at 142, Dick Hendrickson at 144, Stan Dudas at 145 and Bob Pfister the professional at the Llanerch Country Club who posted a 146. Jack Connelly, Hugh Reilly, Sr. the assistant at the Green Valley Country Club and Tony Perla turned in 147s. The last five spots went to Joe Data, Ted McKenzie, Dick Smith, Sr., Bob Schoener, Jr. and Bob Thatcher who had all finished with 148s. When Smith won the Section Championship the Section picked up another spot, which went to the first alternate Ed Dougherty who had qualified with a 149. When Hendrickson didn’t play in the tournament Jerry Port, the professional at the Glen Oak Country Club, made the starting field. Port had also shot a 149 in the qualifying rounds and was the second alternate.

The Jack Cuttle Open was played at the Pocono Manor Inn & Golf Club to honor their golf professional who was in his 50th year as the head professional at Pocono Manor. Cuttle had been the pro there since May 1, 1925 and was now 75 years old. He said he thought that he might retire, as "50 years is really long enough". Jack Connelly won the tournament with a 65.


Dick Smith, Sr.
1974 Section Champion

Philmont Country Club and Buzz Garvin hosted the Section Championship in the second week of October. Dick Smith, Sr. toured Philmont’s par 70 North Course in 70, 73 and 72 for 215 to win his first Section Championship and possession of the Bulletin Cup for one year. He took a two-stroke lead into the last round and finished three ahead of John Kennedy (218) who closed with a 69. Four years earlier Smith had won the Philadelphia Open at Philmont. Dave Collingwood finished third at 219 two strokes in front of Ted McKenzie (221) and Bob Schoener, Jr (221). The purse was $5,965.

The PGA Club Professional Championship was back at the Pinehurst Country Club in late October. Courses #2, #3 and #5 were used. Roger Watson, a true club professional from the Carolinas Section, defeated Sam Snead on the first hole of a sudden death playoff. They had tied with 284 totals. Watson’s rounds were 71, 73, 71 and 69. Bobby Benson (286) finished third and Ron Letellier (287) finished fourth. Ed Dougherty was playing the PGA Tour but he was still eligible for the tournament because he hadn’t played in 12 events in the past 12 months. Dougherty had gotten into the starting field as an alternate when Dick Smith, Sr. won the Section Championship, giving him an automatic spot in the field. Dougherty finished 12th with a 291, picked up $2,000 and qualified for the 1975 PGA Championship. Jack Connelly (297) tied for 45th and won $300.45. Ted McKenzie (298) tied for 56th and Tim DeBaufre (300) tied for 74th. They each won $165. Dick Smith, Sr., Hugh Reilly, Sr., Jerry Port, Stan Dudas, Bob Thatcher, Bob Pfister, Joe Data, Bob Schoener, Jr., John Carson, Tony Perla and Skee Riegel missed the cut.


Bud Lewis
"Golf Professional of the Year"
1974

The Section’s annual meeting was held at the Bala Golf Club on the fourth Monday of October. Frank "Buzz" Garvin was elected president and Don Siok moved from treasurer to secretary. There were three new officers. Dick Smith, Sr. took over as the first vice president and tournament chairman, Pete Dever was elected second vice president and Jim Lydon, the professional at the Glenhardie Country Club was elected treasurer. For a fourth straight year Dick Smith, Sr. was the "Player of the Year" and the winner of the DeBaufre Trophy. Smith led the DeBaufre scoring with an average of 72.90. The "Golf Professional of the Year" honor was awarded to Joseph "Bud" Lewis who had been a professional in the Section for fifty years and the professional at the Manufacturers Golf & Country Club for 31 years. For most of those years Lewis had been a leader in promoting junior golf as well as one of the top players in the Section. Each year he had given more golf lessons than any other pro in the Section, teaching indoors during the winter months.


Charlie Gilbert
National VP District II
1975-77
Section Officer 4 Years

The Southern California Section hosted the national PGA meeting in Hawaii in early December. Hawaii was still part of the Southern California Section. Former Philadelphia Section President Henry Poe was elected president without opposition. Don Padgett moved from treasurer to secretary and Frank Cardi was elected treasurer. There were five candidates for treasurer but two withdrew before the voting began and Cardi received a majority on the first ballot. The decision was made to allow the contestants to use their own caddies at the PGA Championship commencing with the 1978 championship. The next three championship committees had assured the PGA that they would be able to supply qualified caddies. Bert Yancey was at the meeting as the elected representative from the PGA Tour tournament Policy Board. Julius Boros and Cary Middlecoff were voted into the PGA Hall of Fame. Boros and Middlecoff were the first to be inducted since 1969. Charlie Gilbert was sworn in for a three-year term as the vice president representing District II. The Philadelphia Section’s delegates were Buzz Garvin and Don Siok.

Johnny Miller was the leading money winner on the PGA Tour with $353,021 and Hubert Green, who had been an assistant at Merion Golf Club just four years before finished third with $211,709. Miller was also the PGA "Player of the Year". The Vardon Trophy went to Lee Trevino for a fourth time with an average of 70.53 strokes per round. Bert Yancey won $68,871.06 in 30 events and finished 29th on the money list. Art Wall won $14,551.17 in 22 events. Andy Thompson played in fifteen tournaments and won $811.53. Jeff Steinberg played in 13 tournaments and won $502.25.

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