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A Chronicle of the Philadelphia Section PGA and Golf in the Philadelphia Area
by Peter C. Trenham
1990 to 1999
Contents

1990 Dick Smith was elected president of the PGA of America. Stu Ingraham played on the winning PGA Cup Team.
1991 Frank Dobbs won the Philadelphia Open, Pennsylvania Open and Assistants Championship plus ten more events.
1992 Rick Osberg became the eighth player to win the Philadelphia PGA Section Championship more than two times.
1993 John Poole was the national winner of the Bill Strausbaugh Award for his work in Club Relations.
1994 “Rookie of the Year” Jay Sigel and Jack Kiefer each won tournaments on the PGA Senior Tour for the first time.
1995 Ed Dougherty, Ted Tryba & Jim Furyk got 1st PGA Tour wins. Gene Fieger won Philadelphia and PA Opens.
1996 Jack Connelly was on the way to being president of the PGA of America as he was elected to the office of secretary.
1997 Doug Ritter won the national Bill Strausbaugh Award. Gene Fieger won Section Championship & PA Open.
1998 Jason Lamp won the Philadelphia PGA Championship and the Philadelphia Open.
1999 Pete Oakley won the PGA Senior Club Pro Championship. Jim Furyk was on the Ryder Cup Team for a second time.

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1990 - The Philadelphia Section began the 1990s as the PGA’s 12th largest PGA Section. The Section office had five full time employees as well as the field staff that worked from tournament to tournament on a per diem basis.


Charles Genter
Section President 1990-1991
PGA Master Professional
1992 "Golf Professional of the Year"

The Section’s spring meeting was held on the first Monday of April. The Oak Terrace Country Club and their new professional Kerry Mattern hosted the pros. The first vice president and tournament chairman Jack Connelly, who was the professional at the Huntingdon Valley Country Club professional, presented the tournament schedule. The Section members were playing for more than $600,000 that year. A large part of that was the Section Championship, which was again $100.000. Section president and Tavistock Country Club professional Charles Genter announced that the Section had raised more than $100,000 in 1989 for its official charity, the Variety Club for handicapped children. Ron Jaworski was introduced as the honorary chairman of the Philadelphia PGA/Dodge Junior Tour for 1990. There were 25 events on the junior schedule and 400 boys and girls had signed up and paid their dues. The Section secretary, Lu Lu Country Club professional Jack MacCarty, announced that there were now 190 apprentices on the Section rolls. There were now 11,070 PGA members and 7,058 apprentices paying dues to the PGA of America. The number of apprentices had almost doubled in ten years.

The Masters Tournament was played at the Augusta National Golf Club during the first full week of April. The winner was Nick Faldo and he was only the second person to win the Masters in back-to-back years. Just like the year before Faldo had to survive a sudden-death playoff to nail down the win. He and Ray Floyd had tied at 278. The playoff began on the tenth hole. They halved the first playoff hole in pars and Faldo won with a par on the next hole when Floyd made a bogey five. Faldo’s four rounds were 71, 72, 66 and 69. John Huston and Lanny Watkins tied for third with 283s. First prize was $225,000. There were no entries from the Philadelphia Section.

Gary Player won the PGA Seniors’ Championship for the third time. It was played in mid April on the PGA National Golf Club’s Champion Course at Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. Player outplayed one of the strongest fields in the history of the tournament with rounds of 74, 69, 65 and 73 for a 281 total. Chi Chi Rodriguez turned in a last round 66 to finish two strokes out of first pace at 283. Jack Nicklaus and Lee Trevino tied for fourth at 285. Ralph Terry tied for 25th with a 301 and won $3,300. Dick Hendrickson finished in a tie for 58th at 309. He won$915. Rex Baxter and the Olde Masters Driving Range owner, Bob Thatcher, missed the cut. Terry and Hendrickson were in the field off their standings on the Senior PGA Tour. Thatcher and Butch Sweigart were exempt off their finishes in the 1989 PGA Senior Club Pro Championship but Sweigart, who was the professional at the Ingleside Manor Golf Club, didn’t play in the PGA Seniors’ Championship. Baxter, the professional at the Stone Harbor Golf Club, was exempt as a former winner of the PGA Club Professional Championship. First prize was $75,000 from a purse of $450,000.

Ted Tryba found it difficult to get a spot in the starting fields on the PGA Tour even though he had qualified at the Players School in December. The problem was that his number was floating between 50 and 59 so there were 175+ players ahead of him who could decide whether they wanted to play each week before he would be called. He had made it into four tournaments, winning a small check in one, so with another week off in the third week of April he entered the PGA Ben Hogan Tour’s Gateway Open at Fort Meyers, Florida. He didn’t improve his position on the PGA Tour but he helped the balance in his bank account. After shooting rounds of 72 and 70 Tryba entered the last round six shots off the lead but in the third and final round he birdied the last hole for a five under par 67. His 209 total put him in a three-way tie for first with John Daly (209) and Bruce Fleisher (209). The three pros went into a sudden death playoff, which Tryba ended quickly with an eagle three on the first hole. Tryba’s first victory as a professional earned him a check for $20,000. Steve Haskins finished fourth at 210. The purse was $100,000.

Ed Kramer, who was now the professional at the Pitman Golf Club, won the Philadelphia Section Senior Championship and an invitation to the Bell Atlantic Senior Classic on the second Tuesday of May. The victory also qualified Kramer for the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship. The Reading Country Club and Joe Dahl, who was part owner and head professional, hosted the tournament. Kramer turned in a two under par 68 to earn the title and a check for $200. The purse was $900. Ted McKenzie, the teaching professional at the Waltz Golf Farm Driving Range, finished second with a 70. St. Davids Golf Club professional Pete Trenham, Gulph Mills Golf Club professional Willie Scholl and the Woodland Hills Golf Club professional Bob Hutnik tied for third with 71s.

Linwood Country Club head professional Jeff LeFevre, won the Burlington Classic in the third week of May. LeFevre won by one stroke as he put together rounds of 66 on Sunday and 68 on Monday for a six under par 134. Ed Dougherty, who was on a break from the PGA Tour, led the first day with a 63. He ended up in second place at 135. Noel Caruso (136), the Westover Inn & Country Club assistant and Whitemarsh Valley Country Club assistant Miguel Biamon (137) finished third and fourth. The purse was $11,500 and LeFevre took home a check for $2,000.

On the same Monday that the Burlington Classic was ending Tom Robertson, who managed the Golf Shoppe, was leading the local qualifying for the U.S. Open in central Pennsylvania. Qualifying was held at the par 71 Colonial Country Club. When play began in the morning it was cold and wet, which made for scoring difficult for the players with early starting times. Robertson (142) put together rounds of 73 and 69 to take the medallist honors by one stroke. Ted Tryba (143) and Ray Silnik (144), who was now the head professional at the Silver Creek Country Club, picked up the next two places. Ben Witter, an assistant at the Hershey Country Club, and Steve Snyder, the professional at the Berkleigh Country Club, tied for fourth and fifth with 145s. Terry Hertzog (146), the assistant at the Lancaster Country Club, won the last spot in a sudden-death playoff by making a par on the third extra hole. The low round of the day was an afternoon round of 67 by Witter, which moved him past 20 players. Emlyn Aubrey made it through local qualifying at another site in the country.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Philadelphia was held on the fourth Tuesday of May, which was the day after qualifying was held in Harrisburg. Rolling Green Golf Club (par 71) and Llanerch Country Club (par 72) hosted the qualifying. The leaders at 139 were Ed Dougherty with a 70 at Rolling Green in the morning round and 69 at Llanerch after lunch and the teaching pro at the Burlington Country Club, Greg Farrow, who posted a 67 in the morning at Rolling Green to go with a 72 at Llanerch in the afternoon. Jim McGovern was next at 140 without the help of ever having played either course. McGovern drove in from Kentucky where he had been playing in an event on the PGA’s Ben Hogan Tour. McGovern’s brother and a neighbor from northern New Jersey each walked one of the courses on Monday. They met at a motel that night to give McGovern the yardages and to tell him how to play the courses. Charlie Bolling, who was also playing the Hogan Tour, was next at 144. Brian Kelly, who was now the teaching professional at the Plymouth Country Club, and Gene Fieger, who was now the playing professional from the Downingtown Golf Club, tied for the fifth and sixth spots with 145s. The next three places went to Waynesborough Country Club assistant Stu Ingraham, Jim Masserio, who was now the professional at the Aronimink Golf Club, and Bidermann Golf Club assistant professional Chris Anderson. All three posted 146s. Noel Caruso (147) picked up the tenth and last spot in a playoff over three others with a birdie on the second extra hole.

The PGA Bell Atlantic Senior Classic was played at the Chester Valley Golf Club in the fourth week of May. The host pro was John Poole. For the third year in a row a playoff was needed to determine a winner. Dale Douglas and Gary Player ended up in a tie at the top of the leader board with 206 totals. They went into a sudden-death playoff, which began on the par three 15th hole. They halved that hole with pars and Douglas won out on the next hole (16th) with a par against a double-bogey 6 for Player. First prize was $75,000 from a total purse of $500,000. Bob Charles and Charles Coody tied for third at 207. Dick Hendrickson tied for 17th at 216 and won $7,000. Bob Thatcher (228), Art Wall (229) and Ed Kramer (242) finished toward the bottom of the entries and they each won $500. Wall was in the field off his standing on the PGA’s lifetime money list and Hendrickson was there off his standing on the Senior PGA Tour. Kramer had an invitation as the Philadelphia Section senior champion and Thatcher had a sponsor’s exemption. There were 78 in the starting field. For the six days of the tournament week there were 74,000 spectators in attendance, with 30,000 of them paying their way in on Sunday. Both numbers were a record for the tournament.

On the first Monday of June Ed Dougherty (73-70—143) and Emlyn Aubrey (72-72—144), who were back on the PGA Tour, made it through sectional qualifying for the U.S. Open in Rockville, Maryland. Dougherty had qualified locally in Philadelphia and Emlyn Aubrey had made it through local qualifying somewhere else. Qualifying was held at the Woodmont Country Club’s North and South courses. Tom Byrum and Corey Pavin led with 137s. Twelve players who had shot 145s played off for the last two spots. Because the PGA Tour’s Kemper Open had just ended the day before at Potomac, Maryland there were 139 players competing for 46 spots. Dougherty tied for 20th and Aubrey tied for 28th. Dougherty had finished in a tie for 48th in the Kemper Open.

The Philadelphia Assistants Organization had a plan to raise money for the Variety Club and it physically challenged children. The plan, organized by PAO President Joe Missimer, was to have the assistants attempt to set a Guinness World Record for the "Fastest 18-hole Round of Golf". The assistants solicited pledges from various individuals in support of their challenge to the record and the event was held on the first Monday of June. Head professional Bob Sheppard hosted the challenge at the Five Ponds Golf Club. The round had to be played by golfing one ball in a relay around the entire 18-holes. The players were split up into seven groups and a total of 68 assistants were involved. The ball was struck and sent to players waiting in the fairway, played again to players waiting on the green and then the ball was putted into the hole. After the ball was holed it was taken out of the cup and thrown to the next tee where a player was waiting with a baseball glove to catch the ball and lateral it to a player who teed the ball up for the next striker. As the ball traveled around the golf course the players drove or sprinted to their next assigned hole. The Guinness record of 9:51 had been set by a group of mini-tour players in South Africa, of which Chris Anderson was a participant. 250 spectators where on hand to witness this record setting attempt as Missimer struck the first shot when he drove from the 1st tee. The assistants made several attempts to break the record, but their best time was 12:42. Some of the participants were Andy Barbin, Will Reilly and Frank Dobbs, who would later have great moments as Philadelphia Section PGA members. The attempt to set a new record was not successful but raising money was, as the PAO was able to present a check for $30,000 to the Variety Club.

Brian Kelly led the sectional qualifying for the U.S. Open in Summit, New Jersey on the first Tuesday of June. Kelly toured the Canoe Brook Country Club in a 70 in the morning and a 72 in the afternoon for 142 strokes to earn the medallist honors by one stroke. Kelly had qualified locally in Philadelphia. There were six spots at Canoe Brook and the 146 scorers played off for the last four places. One of the players in the playoff was Jimmy Booros, who was on the PGA Tour. He lost out on the second hole.

Qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open was at the Doylestown Country Club on the second Thursday of June. Frank Arasin, a future Section member who was working in Vermont, led with a one over par 73. Llanerch Country Club professional Bob Pfister, Ralph Terry, Pete Trenham, former Section member Bob Ross and reinstated amateur Bucky Erhardt tied at 74. There were four spots so the five players went back out to play off for the second, third and fourth places. Pfister, Ross and Erhardt won the right to move on to the Senior Open in the playoff. Dick Hendrickson was exempt for the tournament off his position on the Senior PGA Tour money list and Art Wall was invited as a former winner of the Masters Tournament and a Ryder Cup Team member.

The U.S. Open was played in the middle of June at the Medinah Country Club, which was near Chicago. When the last round began on Sunday there were 27 players within four strokes of the lead. One of those was Hale Irwin who was four strokes back. Irwin toured the last nine holes in 31 strokes to finish at 280, which is what the USGA seems to think should be the winning score at their Open. Irwin had to wait almost two hours before he would know that he had caught the leader and had tied for the title with Mike Donald. The next day Irwin and Donald played an 18-hole playoff and ended up still tied after posting 74s. They went back to the first hole for sudden-death and Irwin birdied the hole to win the U.S. Open for a third time. Irwin had won his last U.S. Open in 1979 and his ten-year exemption had run out after 1989. He was in the tournament on a special exemption from the USGA. At the age of 45 Irwin became the oldest U.S. Open winner. Irwin’s rounds were 69, 71, 69 and 72. Billy Ray Brown and Nick Faldo tied for third at 281. Ed Dougherty, Emlyn Aubrey and Brian Kelly missed the cut. The purse was $1,217,042.01 and first prize was $220,000.

Delaware’s Shawnee Country Club professional, Pete Oakley, won the two-day Susquehanna Valley Open at the Susquehanna Valley Country Club in the third week of June. The pros played with the club members on Sunday and finished up on Monday paired with the other pros. Oakley put together a 69 and a 66 for a five under par 135 to win by three strokes. Oakley took away a check for $1,000 from the $5,150 purse. Brian Kelly (138), Mayapple Golf Links professional Rob Shuey (139) and Radnor Valley Country Club professional George Forster, Sr. (140) finished second, third and fourth.

The second annual Shawnee Lady Club Pro Classic was played at the Shawnee Country Club in the third week of June. Spring Lake, New Jersey’s Laura D’Alessandro defeated Tennye Ohr of Chevy Chase, Maryland on the second hole of a sudden-death playoff. They had ended up tied at 145 in the two-day tournament. Honey Run Country Club assistant Jody Logan finished third with a 147. Jan Kleiman and Jackie Cannizzo tied for fourth at 148. The purse was $11,000 and first prize was $2,250. There was an extra purse for the Philadelphia Section entries. There was a pro-am the day before the tournament. The host professional was Gordon Neely.

On the first of July Lee Trevino won the U.S. Senior Open by out dueling Jack Nicklaus. The tournament was held in northern New Jersey at the Ridgewood Country Club. Trevino led by one stroke after round one with a 67 and a 68 in the second round kept him in front by one stroke. A 73 in the third round left him two stokes behind Nicklaus with a round to play. In the last round on Sunday Trevino made six birdies and only one bogey for a 67 to finish two strokes ahead of Nicklaus’ 277. Trevino’s 275 total was thirteen under par. First prize was $90,000. It was the sixth win of the year on the Senior PGA Tour for the 50-year-old Trevino. Chi Chi Rodriguez, Mike Hill and Gary Player tied for third with 281s. Dick Hendrickson tied for 23rd at 290 and won $4,964.33. Art Wall posted a 296 to tie for 37th, which won $3,444.50 and Bob Pfister won $2,087 by tying for 56th with a score of 304.

Ray Silnik won the Dodge Golf Classic at the Eagle Lodge Country Club in the first week of July. Silnik opened up on Thursday with a course record equaling 65 and came back the next day with a 68 to win by two strokes. Silnik’s nine under par 133 gave him a $2,000 payday. The total purse was $13,250. Stu Ingraham finished second with a 135 and Roger Stern, the teaching professional at the Wedgewood Golf Club, was next at 137. The Pine Tree Golf Club professional Dale Loeslein, Tom Robertson and Michael Mack, the professional at the Burlington Country Club, tied for fourth with 139s. In the second round Pete Trenham put together a 66 that included nine birdies. The 66 added to a first round 74 gave him a tie for sixth and the low senior prize. It was a good thing that the tournament was played in early summer. There was a two hour and twenty minute rain delay during the first round and the last of the 180 entries completed their rounds in fading light.

Qualifying for the PGA Club Professional Championship was held at the Plymouth Country Club on the third Monday of July. Gene Fieger was the medallist with 69-70 for a five under par 139. Jim Masserio and Harold Perry, the professional at the Kennett Square Golf & Country Club, tied for second with 140s. Greg Farrow and Drew Hood, who was now the professional at the Conestoga Country Club, were next at 142. Spring-Ford Country Club assistant professional Frank Dobbs, Dale Loeslein and Roger Stern tied for sixth with 143s. The last spot went to Pete Oakley who had to get by Atlantic City Country Club assistant Russ Davis, Miguel Biamon and Gary Hardin, who was now the professional at the Northampton Country Club, in a sudden-death playoff. They had all posted 144s. Later in the year Jimmy Booros won the Section Championship but he had played more than 12 tournaments on the PGA Tour in the past 12 months, so he was not eligible for the PGA Club Professional Championship. The Section’s spot for the Section champion went to Hardin who was the first alternate. Stu Ingraham, Rick Osberg, who was now the professional at the Waynesborough Country Club, and Noel Caruso, who was now the assistant professional at the Rehoboth Beach Country Club, were exempt by having finished in the top forty at the 1989 PGA Club Professional Championship. Rex Baxter was exempt as a former champion.

The PGA Senior Club Professional Championship qualifying was also held at the Plymouth Country Club on the third Monday of July. After a disappointing 80 in his morning round Bala Golf Club professional Henry McQuiston came back with a 65 in the afternoon to earn the top spot by one stroke. McQuiston’s 65 was the low round of the day for the pros by four strokes, senior or otherwise. Saucon Valley Country Club professional Jerry Pittman finished second with a 146. Philadelphia Country Club professional Tim DeBaufre and Willie Scholl tied for the third and last spot with 150s. DeBaufre won the spot in a sudden-death playoff with Scholl. Ed Kramer was exempt as the Section Senior Champion.

On the third Wednesday of July Pete Oakley won the one-day Philadelphia Open for the second straight year. The venue was the Merion Golf Club’s East Course. Oakley’s two rounds on the difficult East Course were 68 and 69. His 137 total earned him the first place check of $3,260 by two strokes over Jim Masserio (139). Since the tournament has been played at 36 holes only three players have scored under 137 and none have been better than 136. Amateurs Bill Kennedy (143) and Robin McCool, a pro-golf salesman for Ping clubs, (144) finished third and fourth. Ed Dougherty and amateur Buddy Marucci, who would later be a runner-up in the U.S. Amateur to Tiger Woods, tied for fifth with 145s. Play was so slow that Oakley had to finish eating his lunch while he was walking down the first fairway on the way to play his second shot in the afternoon round. The entry fee was $70 and the purse was $15,104.

Gene Fieger won the Philadelphia Section Assistant Pro Championship on the fifth Monday of July. The tournament sponsored by George Izett Golf was played at the Berkleigh Country Club. Fieger burned up the course with rounds of 69 and 65 for a ten under par 134. Greg Farrow played well but he finished a distant second, seven strokes back at 141. Brian Kelly (142) and Frank Dobbs (143) finished third and fourth.

The two-day Tylenol Kids Classic was played at the White Manor Country Club on the last Monday and Tuesday of July. Gene Sauers made fifteen birdies on the way to an eleven under par (64-69--133) tournament record. It was Sauers’ second win in that event, the other one coming in 1988. Brian Tennyson finished second at 134, Nick Price was next at 135 and Scott Verplank finished fourth with a 136. First prize was $40,000. There were 25 invitees and the Section’s representative, Rick Osberg, finished 23rd at 149. Osberg who had earned an invitation as the Section champion won $6,000.A celebrity skins game, which preceded the first day’s play, drew a large gallery. The participants were Michael Jordan, Frank Gifford, Mike Schmidt and Joe Morgan. The event drew 23,500 spectators for the two days but it lost money. Eleven months later a check for $100,000 was sent to the Special Olympics Committee. The $100,000 was taken from the budget for the 1993 tournament.

In the second week of August the PGA Championship was played at the Shoal Creek Country Club in Birmingham, Alabama. Australian Wayne Grady won by three strokes with rounds of 72, 67, 72 and 71 for a six under par 282. Fred Couples led with six holes to play but four straight bogeys left him in second place at 285. Gil Morgan was next with a 286 and Billy Britton finished fourth at 289. Rick Osberg, Stu Ingraham and Noel Caruso missed the cut and each received $1,000. They were in the tournament for having finished in the top 40 at the 1989 PGA Club Professional Championship, The purse was $1,350,000 and first prize was $225,000.

Rolling Green Golf Club hosted the Pennsylvania Open in the second week of August. Amateur Jay Sigel won with a 71 on Monday and a 69 on Tuesday for a two under par 140. It was the fourth time that Sigel had won the Pennsylvania Open. Twenty-year-old amateur Jim Furyk, who was playing out of the Hershey Country Club, grabbed second place with a fast finish. He birdied the 35th hole and chipped in for an eagle on the last hole to end up one stroke out of a playoff at 141. Furyk’s father Mike Furyk was a Section member and a pro-golf salesman. Jim had won the Pennsylvania high school championship in 1987. The low pro was John Mazza who finished in third place at 142. Mazza’s last round 70 featured a hole-in-one and two other eagles. Gene Fieger, Ed Dougherty and amateur Buddy Marucci tied for fourth with 143s. Mazza’s check for having the lowest professional score was $3,500 and the purse was $18,500.

Rick Osberg won the two-day Mountain Laurel Classic at the Mountain Laurel Resort in late August. Osberg posted a 69 on Monday and a 68 on Tuesday for a seven under par 137 to edge out Jack Connelly (138) and Frank Dobbs (138) by one stroke. Pete Oakley finished fourth at 140. Osberg took home a check for $2,000 from the $11,500 purse.

The E.B. Westlake Memorial Golf Tournament was played at the Whitford Country Club in the second week of September. It was the sixteenth consecutive year that Whitford had hosted the tournament, which had been played under more than one name. Rick Osberg won his second two-day tournament in two weeks by putting together a Sunday 71 and a Monday 67 for a six under par 138. Chris Anderson, Frank Dobbs and Pete Oakley tied for second with 140s. Osberg’s share of the $19,150 purse was $3,000.

On September 10th Charles Genter became the Section’s third PGA Master Professional. The subject of his thesis was "12 Stages for Beginners".


Jimmy Booros
1990 Section Champion

The 59th Philadelphia Section PGA Championship was held at the Eagle Lodge Country Club for the sixth consecutive year. The course measured 6,759 yards. The tournament was played in the middle of September and for the third straight year the purse was $100,000. The entry fee was now $90. The tournament week began on Wednesday with a pro-am to entertain the sponsors and their guests. The Cigna Corporation, which owned Eagle Lodge, was the primary sponsor of the tournament. Other sponsors were the Delaware Valley Dodge Dealers and Seaview Petroleum. On Thursday the tournament got under way with 162 Section members shooting for the Section’s most important title and a top prize of $16,000. On Friday play was interrupted by heavy rain shortly after noon and two hours later the course was declared unplayable. The tournament committee ruled that all of Friday’s scores would count. Many of the players hadn’t even teed off when the rain came. On Saturday those who had not finished resumed play at 8:30 and those who had not begun play teed off one hour later than their assigned times. The field was a cut to the low 60 and ties after the second round was concluded. Scores of 148 and better made the cut and 61 players were paired for the final round. On Sunday Jimmy Booros, who had taken a break from the PGA Tour, fired a 66 to win the title. His earlier rounds of 69 and 68 gave him a total of 203, which tied the tournament record for Eagle Lodge. Booros’s ten under par score nipped Gene Fieger (204), who also finished with a 66, by one stroke. Ed Dougherty and the professional at the new Laurel Creek Country Club, Ed Sabo, tied for third at 206, one stroke in front of Gary Hardin (207) and Russ Davis (207). Fieger won $12,500 and the tie for third was worth $8,000 apiece. Booros had finished third in the tournament three times. There were 52 sub-par rounds shot in the tournament. The host professional was Ed Bohla.


Stu Ingraham
PGA Cup Team 1990

Stu Ingraham was a member of the winning PGA Cup team in fourth week of September. It was America’s turn to be the host and the match, which was played against the club professionals from Great Britain and Ireland, was held at the Turtle Point Golf Club in Kiawah Island, South Carolina. That year the competition included the pros from all of Europe for the first time. Before that the team was made up of pros from Great Britain and Ireland only. It was thought that the Americans would be facing a stiff challenge but they won by the wide margin of 19 to 7. The competition was contested over three days with five rounds of matches. On Friday and Saturday there were four foursomes (alternate stroke) matches each morning and four four-ball (better-ball) matches in the afternoon. On Sunday the ten members of each team met in singles matches. Ingraham, the youngest member of the American team at 30, won three matches and lost one. On Friday he and his partner won both matches and Saturday morning he and his partner lost. Ingraham was given the afternoon off and came back on Sunday to win his singles match 7&6.

Frank Dobbs garnered his first important tournament victory in the fourth week of September at the ninth annual Pennsylvania PGA Championship. Pennsylvania State University hosted the tournament on its Blue Course. The tournament had been held at the Toftrees Resort and Golf Club for the eight years before that. Members of the Philadelphia Section PGA and the Tri-State Section PGA were eligible for the tournament. Dobbs turned in rounds of 72 and 68 for a four under par 140. In Monday’s first round no one scored better than 71 due to strong winds and a golf course that most of the players hadn’t seen before. Brian Kelly finished second at 142. Chris Anderson, Dale Loeslein and Pittsburgh’s John Mazza tied for third with 143s. The purse was $15,000 and first prize was $2,250. The entry fee was $70.

Brett Upper, who was now the professional at the Feather Sound Country Club in Clearwater, Florida, won the PGA Club Professional Championship in the first week of October. The PGA West, LaQuinta Hotel & Golf Resort in California hosted the tournament. The courses used for the tournament were the PGA West Stadium, La Quinta Mountain and the Mission Hills Old. Upper put together founds of 69, 69, 66 and 71 for a thirteen under par 275, which left him three strokes in front of Gibby Gilbert (278) and Larry Gilbert (278). Greg Farrow, Bob Borowicz, and Mike Lawrence tied for fourth with 280s. First prize was $32,000 and Farrow won $12,333.34. Stu Ingraham tied for tenth with a 283, winning $6,620 and Jim Masserio won $3,271 as he tied for 21st at 286. For having finished in the top forty Upper, Farrow, Ingraham and Masserio qualified for the 1991 PGA Championship. Frank Dobbs tied for 43rd at 289 and missed qualifying for the PGA Championship by one stroke. He won $1,018. Gene Fieger tied for 72nd at 293 and Gary Hardin posted a 294 to tie for 83rd. Fieger won $665 and Hardin won $625. The total purse was $400,000. The win propelled Upper to the PGA Club Professional of the year honors. Noel Caruso missed the cut by one stroke with a 220 total. Pete Oakley, Rick Osberg, Harold Perry, Dale Loeslein, Roger Stern and Drew Hood missed the cut. Rex Baxter withdrew without playing.

The second annual Hanson Cup challenge matches were played in the fourth week of October. The matches were a two-day competition between the Philadelphia Section PGA and the Tri-State Section PGA. It was Philadelphia’s turn to host the match and Bud Hansen’s Commonwealth National Golf Club was the venue. The challenge match would have been in Philadelphia the year before but the Commonwealth course wasn’t quite open yet. There were twelve players on each team, of which two had to be seniors. In the first round better-ball matches on Wednesday the Tri-State Section took a 3-½ to 2-½ point lead. The teams that earned the points for Philadelphia were Greg Farrow-Chris Anderson and Pete Oakley-Miguel Biamon who won their matches. The Ed Sabo-Jim Muething team halved their match. Muething was an assistant at the Pine Valley Golf Club. On Thursday there were twelve singles matches and the Philadelphia pros came through with nine wins and a halved match to win the challenge cup 12 points to 6. Plymouth Country Club professional Don DeAngelis, George Forster, Sr., Brian Kelly, Anderson, Biamon, Farrow, Oakley along with seniors Willie Scholl and Pete Trenham won their matches. Frank Dobbs halved his match. Philadelphia now led the Hansen Cup with two wins and no losses.


Tim DeBaufre
"Golf Professional of the Year"
1990

The Section held its fall meeting and election of officers at the Brandywine Country Club on the fifth Monday of October. Section President Charles Genter and all of the other officers were reelected. Jack Connelly was the first vice president and tournament chairman. Country Club of Harrisburg professional Mike Atkins was the second vice president. The second vice president presided over education, employment and apprentices. Jack MacCarty was reelected secretary and Medford Village Country Club professional Leo DeGisi was reelected treasurer. The Section’s junior golf chairman, Tony DeGisi, who was the professional at the Spring-Ford Country Club, reported that more than 500 boys and girls had been enrolled in the Section’s Junior Tour, which resulted in almost 2,000 junior tour tournament rounds for the year. Connelly reported that the Section had raised almost $700,000 during the year for various charities. Tim DeBaufre was the Section’s "Golf Professional of the Year". DeBaufre had been the tournament chairman and the Section president along with spending many years on the tournament committee. He had been a moving force in making the Section’s tournament program one of the best in the country and the envy of other PGA Sections. During his three years as the tournament chairman the tournament purses increased by two hundred and fifty percent. Tim and his family had donated the DeBaufre Trophy to the Section in memory of his father Ed in 1964. DeBaufre, the professional at the Wildwood Golf & Country Club, had died in an automobile accident that winter. Each year the trophy was awarded to the Section member that finished the tournament season with the lowest scoring average. The DeBaufre Trophy winner was Rick Osberg with a stroke average of 70.33 and he was also the Section’s "Player of the Year". That was the second straight year that Osberg had won those two awards and it was the third time he had been "Player of the Year". The Hansen Cup point leader for the year was Frank Dobbs. The "Teacher of the Year" was longtime Shawnee Inn & Country Club professional Dick Farley.

The PGA Senior Club Professional Championship was played at the Ballenisles Country Club’s East Course in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. Ballenisles, owned by Philadelphia’s Bud Hansen, was formerly the PGA National Golf Club and winter home of the PGA pros. It was held in the second week of November. Tom Joyce turned in rounds of 71, 68, 69 and 70 for a 278 that won by two strokes. First prize was $12,000. Jim Albus (280), Marion Heck (283) and Lynn Rosely (285) finished second, third and fourth. Tim DeBaufre tied for 17th with a 293 total and won $1,763. That also qualified DeBaufre for the 1991 PGA Seniors’ Championship as the top 70 made it. The purse was $125,000. Ed Kramer, Henry McQuiston and Jerry Pittman missed the cut.

In late November Jack Kiefer finished tied for second at the PGA Senior Tour qualifying school, which made him eligible for almost every tournament on the 1991 PGA Senior Tour. Kiefer (68-68-69-67--272) finished at eight under par, which was just one stroke more than the medallist, Simon Hobday (68-69-68-66--271). Kiefer also picked up a check for $3,000. Eight players qualified for full exemptions and the second eight earned conditional status. Qualifying was held at the 6,706-yard Westin Mission Hills Resort in Rancho Mirage, California.


Dick Smith, Sr.
President, PGA of America
1991 and 1992
Section President 3 years
Section Champion 5 times

Woodcrest Country Club professional Dick Smith, Sr. was unanimously affirmed as the new president of the PGA of America at the national meeting on the first day of December. The meeting was held at the LaQuinta Hotel Golf & Tennis Resort in LaQuinta, California. Gary Schaal moved up to vice president and Tom Addis III won out over Ken Lindsay for the office of secretary. Over 300 PGA officers, members and staff attended the four-day meeting. The delegates from the Philadelphia Section were Charles Genter and Jack MacCarty along with several alternates. The delegates had 31 resolutions to consider. The first resolution was to accept a rewritten PGA constitution, which the delegates did. It had last been rewritten in 1967 and had become burdened with 400 amendments. The resolution that got the most attention was to allow inactive members to keep their membership as long as they continue to satisfy the "Professional Development Program" points. There was a great deal of intense discussion on both sides but the resolution passed. The theme was "once a member always a member". With an expected influx of 5,000 new members in the next five years there were five resolutions designed to help expand career paths for PGA members. Twenty of the thirty-one resolutions passed.

The leading money winner on the PGA Tour was Greg Norman with $1,165,477 and he won the Vardon Trophy with a 69.10 stroke average. The PGA "Player of the Year" was also Nick Faldo. Late in the year Ed Dougherty made nine straight cuts and earlier in the year he had a second place finish in the Milwaukee Open. That allowed him to earn just enough money to stay eligible on the PGA Tour for 1991. Dougherty won $124,505, which left him in 123rd place on the money list. The top 125 kept their "playing cards". Emlyn Aubrey and Jimmy Booros each played in 30 tournaments and missed the magic 125th place number. Aubrey was 126th with $122,329 and Booros was next at 127 with $121,948. Three of the players who finished ahead of them were not members of the PGA Tour so Aubrey and Booros were considered to be in the top 125 and exempt for the next year. Ted Tryba only got into 18 tournaments and won just $10,708.

The PGA Ben Hogan Tour began in 1990 as a second tour for the PGA Tour. Most of the tournaments offered a purse of $100,000. When Ted Tryba wasn’t able to get into the tournaments on the PGA Tour he was entering the Hogan Tour events were he was able to pick up $23,735 in seven events that year. Noel Caruso got into eight events and won $2,880. Emlyn Aubrey played in two tournaments when he wasn’t eligible for the PGA Tour event and won $2,334. Charlie Bolling played in ten tournaments winning only $770 and he won another $684 in a PGA Tour tournament.

Lee Trevino led the PGA Senior Tour with $1,190,515 in earnings. Dick Hendrickson played in 34 tournaments and finished the year in 34th place on the money list with winnings of $159,070. Art Wall was exempt but he only entered 15 tournaments. He ended up in with a total of $23,134. Jack Kiefer, who had to qualify on Mondays, got into five tournaments and won $21,930. Ralph Terry made it into 15 tournaments off his 1989 record on the PGA Senior Tour, his fame as a baseball player and qualifying. He won $20,725. Ironically Wall (86th), Kiefer (87th) and Terry (88th) finished together on the money list. Bob Thatcher played in two tournaments and won $500.

In 1990 the R & A golf association, which governed the rules of golf for all countries except the United States and Mexico, abandoned the small golf ball and joined the USGA in its measurements for the ball. Until that time a golfer could play with the small golf ball or a larger ball except in the United States and Mexico. The smaller golf ball was known as the British size golf ball.

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1991 - In early February Chris Anderson won the PGA Winter Tournament Program’s PGA Match Play Tournament. In the 36-hole finals Anderson defeated Lee Rinker, his one-time University of Alabama teammate, by 3&1. First prize was $3,000. Anderson won seven matches in seven days to take the title.

In late March Gene Fieger, who was now the playing professional at the Overbrook Golf Club, returned from a successful winter in South Florida. He led the PGA’s eleven event Founders Tour for club pros. The eleven tournaments were played during a four-month span of November to February. Fieger won one event and finished second twice while compiling earnings of $19,481.

The Section’s spring meeting was held at the Oak Terrace Country Club on the first Monday of April. The tournament chairman Jack Connelly presented the tournament schedule. There were 60 tournaments offering over $500,000 in purses. There was also a junior tour schedule and a schedule of events for the Philadelphia Assistants Organization, which was known as the PAO. Connelly also announced the hiring of PGA member Tom Carpus as the Section’s tournament director. Carpus had been an assistant at Rolling Green Golf Club since 1985. He was now responsible for the twelve person field staff and all tournament operations. Carpus would oversee 65 Section tournaments, 25 junior tour events and the playing ability tests for apprentices. A new event on the Section schedule was a match play tournament. The Section had not held a match play tournament since 1959 when the Section Championship was last played with a match play format. In 1931 a match play tournament was held in the Section as well as the Section Championship, which was still a stroke play event. The next year the Section Championship was changed to the match play format in order to be the same as the national PGA Championship. From 1932 through 1959 the Section Championship was contested with the match play format except 1937 when the Section champion was determined through 36 holes of stroke play. A match play event was held as well that year. The Section had selected a Playing Legends team and a highlight of the meeting was the appearance of team-member George B. Smith who was 85-years old. Smith, who was a three-time Section champion, spoke briefly on some of his golf memories.

The Masters Tournament was played in the second full week of April as usual. With a par on the last hole, Welshman Ian Woosnam held off his closest competitors. Woosnam drove to the left of the fairway bunkers on the 18th hole and from there he reached the green with a second shot, which was totally blind. Woosnam’s four rounds over the Augusta National course were 72, 66, 67 and 72 for an eleven under par 277. Jose Maria Olazabal, who was playing ahead of Woosnam made a bogey on the last hole, and finished second at 278. Tom Watson was playing with Woosnam and he made a double bogey on the last hole to finish in a three-way tie for third with Ben Crenshaw and Steve Pate at 279. There was no one from the Philadelphia Section in the starting field. The purse was $1,347,696 and first prize was $243,000.

The PGA Seniors’ Championship was held on the PGA National Golf Club’s Champion Course at Palm Beach Gardens, Florida for the ninth straight year. The tournament was played in the third week of April. Jack Nicklaus won by six strokes with rounds of 66, 66, 69 and 70 for 271. In the eight previous years that the tournament had been played on the Champion Course no one had finished with a score below 281. Bruce Crampton (277), Bob Charles (282) and Homero Blancas (283) finished second, third and fourth. It was the fifth time that Crampton had finished second to Nicklaus in a major tournament. Dick Hendrickson tied for 14th at 289 and won $8,500. Jack Kiefer turned in a 296 total, which earned him in a tie for 39th and $1,962.50. Hendrickson and Kiefer were in the field as exempt players on the Senior PGA Tour. Tim DeBaufre missed the cut. First prize was $85,000 and the total purse was $550,000. DeBaufre had qualified at the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship in November.

On the fourth Monday of April Willie Scholl earned a spot in the Bell Atlantic Senior Classic. Scholl toured the rain soaked White Manor Country Club in a three under par 69 to edge out 16 other senior members of the Section. Bob Thatcher was in the tournament on a sponsor’s invitation.

Ted Tryba, who was now relegated to the PGA’s Ben Hogan Tour, led the local qualifying for the U.S. Open in central Pennsylvania at the Carlisle Country Club on the third Monday of May. Tryba topped 85 pros and amateurs as he posted a pair of 69s for a four under par 138. Lebanon’s Greg Lesher, who was playing the mini tours, Cleve Coldwater, the assistant at the Country Club of Scranton and Joe Donnelly tied for second with 142s. Dale Loeslein, who was now the teaching professional at the Wilmington Country Club, won the next spot with a 143. John Kulhamer, the professional at the White Deer Golf Club, and Don Dimoff, the professional at the Red Lion Country Club, tied for the last two spots with 144s.

Local qualifying in the Philadelphia area for the U.S. Open was held on the third Tuesday of May. The host clubs were the Philadelphia Cricket Club and the Green Valley Country Club. Riverton Country Club assistant John DiMarco (75-66), Frank Dobbs (73-68), Gene Fieger (69-72) and Rick Osberg (71-70) tied for the medal with one under par 141s. The Green Valley scores are listed first. Harold Perry finished fifth at 142 and Cedarbrook Country Club assistant professional Dave Roberts was next at 143. Lehigh Country Club professional Wayne Phillips and amateur James Kania tied for seventh and eighth with 145s. The last two places went to Miguel Biamon (146), who was now the teaching professional at the Waynesborough Country Club, and Russ Davis (146), who was now the professional at the Cape May National Golf Club. There were ten spots. Ed Dougherty was exempt from local qualifying off having been in the top 125 money winners on the PGA Tour the year before.

Reading’s Rick Price passed the local qualifying test for the U.S. Open at another location.

After six years at the Chester Valley Golf Club, The Bell Atlantic Senior Classic moved ten miles to the White Manor Country Club. The move agreed with Jim Ferree who had never had much luck at Chester Valley. In the fourth week of May Ferree led wire to wire as he put together three rounds of 67, 69 and 72 for an eight under par 208. Using his 50-inch long putter, Ferree one-putted 19 times and three-putted only once as he picked up his second win in ten years on the Senior PGA Tour. Lee Trevino and Jim Colbert tied for second with 210 totals. Harold Henning finished fourth at 212. First prize was $82,500. Jack Kiefer (224) tied for 44th and won $2,205. Dick Hendrickson and Bob Thatcher tied for 49th with 225 totals as they each earned checks for $1,333. Art Wall (237) and Willie Scholl (240) finished at the end of the 72-man field and they each won $500. Kiefer and Hendrickson were exempt players on the Senior PGA Tour. Wall was exempt off his standing on the lifetime PGA Tour lifetime money list. The host pro was Doug Hendricks.

On the first Monday of June Rick Osberg (135) and Ed Dougherty (137) qualified for the U.S. Open at the Woodmont Country Club in Rockville, Maryland. Woodmont had two golf courses, North and South, and both were used for the qualifying. There were 167 players vying for 44 spots at Woodmont because the PGA Tour’s Kemper Open had just concluded nearby the day before. Craig Parry led the qualifying at Woodmont with a 66 and a 67 for 133. Osberg tied for eighth and Dougherty tied for 21st. There were sixteen players with 139 scores and they went into a sudden-death play off for the last six spots, which wasn’t completed until the next morning.

Frank Dobbs qualified for the U.S. Open on the first Tuesday of June. He qualified at the Canoe Brook Country Club in northern New Jersey. Dobbs posted a 73 and a 69 for 142 to earn one of the fourteen spots at Canoe Brook. Mark McCumber, Tom Purtzer, David Jackson and Jay Gunning led the scoring with 140s. Dobbs tied for 8th. It took 144 or better to qualify. The North and South courses were used at Canoe Brook.

Rick Price successfully qualified for the U.S. Open at another site.

The Philadelphia Section Senior Championship was played at the Reading Country Club on the first Tuesday of June. Bob Thatcher, who was a part owner of Reading Country Club, finished in a tie for first with Pete Trenham at one under par 69. Thatcher wrapped up the Section’s senior title by holing a twelve-foot putt for a birdie on the first extra hole. Henry McQuiston and the Westover Inn & Golf Club teaching professional John Carson tied for third with 70s.

The third annual Shawnee Lady Club Pro Championship was held at the Shawnee Country Club in the second week of June. There was a pro-am on Sunday and the tournament was played on Monday and Tuesday. The title and a check for $2,000 went to Florida professional Lisa Chirichetti who turned in a three under par 141. Sandra Jaskol finished second at 145. Jody Logan, an assistant pro at the Honey Run Golf Club tied for third with a 146. Lisa Day (149), an assistant to her husband Jerry at the West Chester Golf & Country Club and Beth Ward (151), an assistant at the Lebanon Country Club, ended well up in the money.

The U.S. Open was played in Minneapolis, Minnesota at the Hazeltine National Golf Club in mid July. Payne Stewart led or was tied for the lead after each round but he had to play an extra round to capture the title. Stewart’s rounds were 67, 70, 73 and 72. At the end of regulation play Stewart and Scott Simpson were deadlocked at 282. In a Monday playoff that featured lightening fast greens neither player threatened par. When it was all over Stewart was the winner with a 75 against a 77 for Simpson. First prize was $235,000. Fred Couples and Larry Nelson tied for third with 285s. Frank Dobbs, Rick Osberg and Ed Dougherty missed the cut. The total purse was $1,311,832.

Qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open was at the Northampton Country Club on the third Monday of July. Ben Smith who was a member of the PGA Senior Tour led with a 68 and amateur Gordon Brewer was next at 69. The third and last spot went to Jack Kiefer (70) in a sudden-death playoff. Kiefer was an exempt player on the PGA Senior Tour but he still had to qualify for the U.S. Senior Open.

Miguel Biamon won the Susquehanna Valley Open in the third week of June. The scoring was low and the competition was tightly contested. On Sunday Biamon toured the Susquehanna Valley Country Club course in 65 strokes and he came back with a 69 on Monday for a six under par 134. Gary Hardin finished one shot back with a 135. Frank Dobbs and Jack Connelly tied for third with 136s. The purse was $5,150 and the top prize was $950.


Ed Sabo
Won on PGA Tour
Won Match Play

The day after the Susquehanna Valley Open ended the Philadelphia Section’s Match Play Championship got under way at the newly revised PineCrest Country Club. This was the former Montgomeryville Golf Club. Sixty-four Section pros teed off in the first round with the pairings based on each player’s position on the current season’s point list. After five rounds of matches the finals came down to Ed Sabo and Gene Fieger, with Sabo prevailing by the count of 5&4. In the semifinals Sabo had defeated the host professional Joe Max and Fieger had eliminated Philmont Country Club assistant professional Bob Kave 4&3. The entry fee was $75 and first prize was $1,200.

Gene Fieger won the Burlington Classic in mid July. Fieger scorched the par 70 Burlington Country Club in 63 strokes on Sunday and he came back with a 68 on Monday. His 131 total won by just two strokes. Greg Farrow and Drew Hood tied for second with 133s. Pete Oakley was alone in fourth place at 135. The purse was $15,650 and Fieger took home $2,400.

Two days after the Burlington Classic ended the Philadelphia Open was played. The tournament was played at the Cedarbrook Country Club on the third Wednesday of July. Frank Dobbs shot an even par 72 in the morning and went to lunch trailing eleven players. In the afternoon Dobbs started birdie, eagle, birdie and then he birdied four holes on the back nine to post a 67. His 139 total earned him a two-stroke victory over Dave Roberts (141), Greg Farrow (141) and Meadowlands Country Club professional Jay Friedman (141). The total purse was $13,920 and Dobbs won $2,600. The entry fee was $70.

The U.S. Senior Open was played at the Oakland Hills Country Club near Detroit in late July. Jack Nicklaus won the tournament in a playoff and joined Arnold Palmer as a winner of the U.S. Open, U.S. Amateur and U.S. Senior Open. Nicklaus opened with rounds of 72, 69 and 70, which put him in a tie with Chi Chi Rodriguez and one stroke behind the leader Lee Trevino. On Sunday Trevino slipped to a 74 while Nicklaus and Rodriguez were posting 71s. That left Nicklaus and Rodriguez in a tie at 282 and headed for a Monday playoff. In the playoff Nicklaus birdied five of the first eight holes and went on to shoot a 65 against a 69 for Rodriguez. A rainy day that even caused a two-hour rain delay softened the course and made for easier scoring. First prize was $110,000. Al Geiberger finished third at 283. Trevino and Jim Dent finished in a tie for fourth with 284s. Jack Kiefer (191) tied for 17th and won $7,687.50.

Frank Dobbs won the Philadelphia Section Assistant Pro Championship, which was sponsored by George Izett Golf, on the fifth Monday of July. The tournament was hosted by the Philmont Country Club on its North and South courses. Dobbs took the lead in the morning round with a 66 and came back in the afternoon with a 69. His five under par 135 total gave him a six-stroke win over Wilmington Country Club assistant John Owens. Miguel Biamon was next at 142. Dave Roberts and the defending champion Gene Fieger tied for fourth with 143s. First prize was $700 out of a total purse of $5,200.

At the end of July Scott Hoch won the Tylenol Kids Classic at the new Commonwealth National Golf Club. The course measured 7,045 yards. The first day it rained and the course played quite long. The second day the tees were moved up some and the scores were quite low but it didn’t seem to make a difference to Hoch as he played well both days. The scoring average for the 23 touring pros was 72.65 on Monday and 68.83 on Tuesday. Hoch’s rounds were 67 and 66 for an eleven under par 133. Hoch’s caddy was at Commonwealth National early enough on Monday morning to walk the course before play began and it must have helped. First prize was $52,000 from a total purse of $280,000. Aided by second round 64s, Rocco Mediate (134) and Kenny Knox (136) finished second and third. Mike Reid, Mark Brooks and Gil Morgan tied for fourth with 137s. The Philadelphia Section’s representative, Jimmy Booros, finished near the end of the field with a 147 and earned $6,000. The tournament was preceded by a celebrity event on Sunday and the attendance for the three days was 40,000.

Qualifying for the PGA Club Professional Championship was at the Torresdale-Frankford Country Club on the first Monday of August. Gene Fieger led the field by six strokes with rounds of 66 and 73 for a one under par 139. Brian Kelly, who was now the teaching professional at the Ingleside Manor Golf Club, finished second at 145. Jack Connelly and Harold Perry picked up the third and fourth spots with 146s. Gary Hardin and Ed Sabo were next at 147. The seventh opening went to Chris Anderson who posted a 148 and Roger Stern, who turned in a 149, won the last spot. Miguel Biamon earned a spot in the tournament later as the Section champion. Greg Farrow, Stu Ingraham, who was now the professional at the Overbrook Golf Club, and Jim Masserio were exempt off their top forty finishes in the 1990 tournament.

Qualifying for the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship was also held at Torresdale-Frankford Country Club on the first Monday of August. Willie Scholl was the medallist with an 80 and a 71 for 151. The other two spots went to Pete Trenham with a 152 and Bob Pfister, who made it with a 153. Bob Thatcher was exempt as the Section senior champion.

Long-shot John Daly won the PGA Championship in the second week of August. A week before the tournament Daly was the ninth alternate. When Nick Price withdrew to be present at the birth of his child and three alternates declined the last minute invitation Daly was in. Daly even employed Price’s caddy. Without a practice round Daly produced rounds of 69, 67, 69 and 71. His 276 on the par 72 Crooked Stick Golf Club, which was near Indianapolis, brought him in three strokes in front of Bruce Lietzke (279). First prize was $230,000. Jim Gallagher, Jr., who had grown up nearby where his father was a club pro, finished third at 281. Kenny Knox was next with a 282. Ed Dougherty, who was in the field off his standing on the PGA Tour, won $4,030 as he tied for 43rd with a 290. Stu Ingraham, Greg Farrow, Jim Masserio and Brett Upper missed the cut. They had all qualified by having finished in the top forty at the 1990 PGA Club Professional Championship and they each won $1,000. The purse was $1,400,000.


Frank Dobbs
Won 1991 Philadelphia Open
Won1991 Pennsylvania Open
Won 12 Section Events in 1991

The Pennsylvania Open was held at the Butler Country Club in the second week of August. Frank Dobbs (72-67) and Kent Stauffer (66-73) finished the two-day tournament tied at 139. At the conclusion of Tuesday’s round the two pros went into a sudden-death playoff. They matched pars for seven holes. On the eighth hole Dobbs claimed the title with another par and picked up the first place check for $3,500. Aronimink Golf Club assistant professional Jim Mancill finished third at 141. Gene Fieger and Brian Kelly tied for fourth with 143s. It was the seventh tournament win for Dobbs is six weeks and he achieved a rare double by winning the Philadelphia Open and the Pennsylvania Open in the same year.

Frank Dobbs won another tournament, and his fourth in the month of August, by capturing the Mountain Laurel Classic title. There was a pro-am on Sunday and the tournament was played on Monday and Tuesday at the Mountain Laurel Resort, which was formerly the Hershey Pocono Resort. Dobbs toured the Mountain Laurel Resort course in 71 and 66 for a seven under par total of 137. Chris Anderson finished second by one stroke with a 138 and Brian Kelly was next at 139. Dave Roberts and Little Mill Country Club professional Ken Peyre-Ferry tied for fourth with 140s. The purse was $9,200 and Dobbs’ take was $1,500.

The Whitford Invitational was won by Stu Ingraham in the second week of September at the Whitford Country Club. On Sunday with two of the pros playing with two Whitford members or guests Ingraham took the lead with a seven under par 65. On Monday Ingraham birdied six of the first twelve holes and then made bogeys on five of the last six holes. In spite of the finish Ingraham managed to shot 73, which gave him a 138 total. That was just enough to nip Gary Hardin (139) by one stroke. Frank Dobbs and Don DeAngelis tied for third with 140s. Ingraham picked up a check for $2,100 from the $16,700 purse.


Miguel Biamon
1991 Section Champion

Three days after the Whitford tournament, 174 Section members teed off in the Section Championship at the Eagle Lodge Country Club. Once again the purse was $100,000 and first prize was $16,000. The entry fee was $90. Frank Dobbs, who had won thirteen times that year, began the tournament in the same mode. Dobbs opened up with a six under par 65 on Thursday and he came right back with a 66 on Friday to lead by five strokes. The field was cut to the low 90 and ties. On Saturday Dobbs began to slip a little on the last nine but he still led by two strokes with three holes to play. When he made bogeys on #16 and #17 he found himself on the 18th tee all even with Miguel Biamon. On the 497-yard par 5 last hole both players reached the green with 185-yard six iron shots. Dobbs just missed his 20-foot eagle putt and when Biamon holed his 12-foot eagle putt he was the champion. Biamon had three steady rounds of 70, 66 and 70 for 206 and Dobbs was next at 207. A last round 65 pulled the defending champion Jimmy Booros (210) up into a tie for third with Rick Flesher (210), who was now the professional at the Berkleigh Country Club. The host professional was Mike Moses.

Ted Tryba won on the Ben Hogan Tour at the $1,000,000 Utah Classic. The tournament was played in the third week of September at the par 72 Riverside Country Club in Provo, Utah. Tryba (202) opened up with a seven under par 65 and then tacked on a 68 and a 69 to win by one stroke over Webb Heintzelman (203). Steve Brodie, Olin Browne, Rick Dalpos, P.J. Horgan III, and Jeff Woodland tied for third with 206 totals. First prize was $20,000.

The Pennsylvania PGA Championship was held at the Scotch Valley Country Club near Altoona in the fourth week of September. Most of the prize money stayed in western Pennsylvania as Jim Cichra (141) and Bob Ford (141) tied for the top prize of $1,600. After posting a 69 and a 72, Cichra wrapped up the title by beating Ford (68-73) with a birdie on the first hole of a sudden-death playoff. Pete Oakley, Ron Milanovich, Joe Boros, Dick Von Tacky and John Rech tied for third with 142s. The total purse was $10,000.

In what was a first for the Section a team of twelve professionals from the Philadelphia Section met a team of twelve amateurs from the Golf Association of Philadelphia on the fourth Thursday of September. There were at least two seniors on each team. The venue was the Rolling Green Golf Club. The players were paired in fours and in each pairing there was a four-ball match and two singles matches with a total of three points on the line. In the six four-ball matches the teams of Frank Dobbs-Brian Kelly and John DiMarco-Chris Anderson were the only winners. Dobbs, Kelly, DiMarco, Noel Caruso, Gary Hardin, Ken Peyre-Ferry and Bob Pfister won their singles matches. Halved singles matches by Anderson and Greg Farrow enabled the pros to eke out a 10 to 8 victory. Pete Oakley, George Forster, Sr. and John Carson were also members of the team.

In the first week of October Gene Fieger missed winning the PGA Club Professional Championship by one stroke. The Doral Resort & Country Club in Miami hosted the tournament on its Blue, Gold and Silver courses. Due to heavy rains one of the courses had to be adjusted to a par 66. The courses were closed to carts and the players had to carry their bags. That problem was solved when the tournament sponsor, Taylor Made Golf Company, shipped in a supply of lightweight golf bags. Larry Gilbert picked up the win, his third PGA Club Pro title, with rounds of 67, 65, 67 and 68 for a three over par 267. First prize was $32,000. Gene Fieger and Ron McDougal tied for second with 269s and they each picked up $19,500. Mike San Filippo finished fourth at 269. Harold Perry put together a 275 and tied for 13th, winning $5,321. Ed Sabo finished with a 279 and won $1,343 for a tie for 35th. The top forty qualified for the 1992 PGA Championship and Sabo was in a seven-way tie for the last six spots. The last round of the tournament was used as the tiebreaker and a 71 by Sabo put him in the PGA Championship along with Fieger and Perry. Fieger’s second place finish made him a member of the PGA Cup Team along with Brett Upper who was on the team as the 1990 CPC champion. Miguel Biamon (282) and Stu Ingraham (282) tied for 66th and each won $705. Greg Farrow (284) also made the cut, tied for 80th and won $637. Chris Anderson and Brian Kelly missed the cut by one stroke with three over par 212s. Jack Connelly, Roger Stern, Jim Masserio, and Gary Hardin also missed the cut. The purse was $400,000.


Harry Hammond
Section President 1985
PGA Master Professional
Junior Golf Leader
"Golf Professional of the Year"
1991

The Section’s fall meeting and election of officers was held at the Hershey’s Mill Golf Club on the last Monday of October. There was a changing of the guard as a new slate of officers was elected. The new president was Leo DeGisi who moved up from treasurer. Whitemarsh Valley professional Jim Bromley and Brandywine Country Club professional George McNamara were elected first and second vice president. Mike Atkins moved from second vice president to secretary and Jack MacCarty moved from secretary to treasurer. The national president, Dick Smith, Sr., was in attendance and reported on national affairs. The Oldsmobile Scramble was a large item on the Section schedule. Each of the Section’s golf courses could hold a local qualifying round. Based on the number of teams qualifying at a club one or more teams would move on to sectional qualifying at a site in its PGA Section. The Philadelphia Section led the country that year as 183 teams advanced to the sectional qualifying rounds. The 183 teams, made up of four amateurs and a golf professional, were divided up among four sectional qualifiers. The low net and low gross team from each sectional qualifying round then moved on to the national championship at the Walt Disney World Resort in Florida. $50,000 in cash and golf merchandise was awarded to the participants in the sectional qualifying rounds. Based on the number of entries at the local level, each PGA Section received money from Oldsmobile. The "Golf Professional of the Year" was Harry Hammond, who had dedicated his career to junior golf. Along with running junior clinics and overseeing the Section’s junior tour Hammond and his staff at Whitford Country Club spent countless hours cutting down and regriping clubs for the junior golfers of the Delaware Valley. Frank Dobbs was the "Player of the Year". Dobbs also won the DeBaufre Trophy with a scoring average of 69.00 and he led the Hansen Points race with 426.33 points versus 312 points for the second place finisher. There was a new award that year for the senior player of the year, which was named for Skee Riegel. Bob Thatcher was the winner of the "Skee Riegel Senior Player of the Year" award. Thatcher won the Section Senior Championship and led the senior points list. The Section’s "Teacher of the Year" was Trenton Country Club professional Dennis Milne.

The Philadelphia PGA and the Middle Atlantic PGA co-sponsored the East Coast Golf Merchandise Show at the Atlantic City Convention Center in late October. Professionals from twenty PGA Sections attended the three-day event. The pro-golf salesmen and their companies displayed the latest golf merchandise. The show featured eight educational programs and the keynote speaker was short game guru Dave Pelz. The show was only held that one year as the PGA of America ruled that a PGA Section could not hold a merchandise show outside its boundaries and two or more PGA Sections could not co-sponsor a show. The owner of the show, Seabury Management Inc., later sued the PGA of America and the Middle Atlantic PGA Section for a violation of breach of agreement and violated antitrust laws. Seabury won its case in court in early 1993 but later a judge vacated the ruling. The judge stated that the Middle Atlantic PGA had breached its contract with Seabury and ordered the PGA to pay reasonable attorney fees. One of the owners of Seabury was Dan Daniels a former legal counsel for the PGA of America.

The PGA of America’s four-day national meeting was held at the PGA National Resort, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida in the second week of November. Over 350 delegates, national officers and staff members attended the meeting from the 41 PGA Sections and the national offices. President Dick Smith, Sr., Vice President Gary Schaal and Secretary Tom Addis III were all reelected without opposition for another one-year term. Smith’s son Dick Smith, Jr., who was his assistant at the Woodcrest Country Club, gave the nominating speech for his father. There were 15 resolutions to be considered. Eight passed without amendments and two passed with amendments. One change was that now all members of the PGA Tour, Senior PGA Tour and Ben Hogan Tour were Class A-3 PGA members as soon as they attained membership in those Tours. If they decided to become a different Class A member at a later date they would have to attend the schools and pass the tests like other PGA members had done. The delegates from the Philadelphia Section were Leo DeGisi and Jack MacCarty.

In mid November the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship was held at the Ballenisles Country Club for a second straight year. Ballenisles was the old PGA Golf Club in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida and all four rounds were played on the East Course. The tournament came down to a battle between the Joyce brothers. When the tournament ended Tom (281) was the winner with rounds of 68, 71, 71 and 71and Mike (283) was second. First prize was $13,500. Dave Philo finished third with a 284 and Bill Kennedy was next at 285. Willie Scholl (283) tied for 20th and won $2,016. Bob Pfister and Bob Thatcher tied for 27th with 296s and they each won $1,600. They all qualified for the 1992 PGA Seniors’ Championship as the top 70 made it. Pete Trenham missed the cut. The purse was $175,000.

In early December Emlyn Aubrey and Greg Lesher qualified for the PGA Tour at the final stage of the three-level PGA Tour Qualifying School. Final stage qualifying was held at the Grenelefe Golf and Tennis Resort in Haines City, Florida. The medalist for the six rounds was Mike Standley with a total of 412. Aubrey finished 12th with rounds of 70, 77, 73, 66, 67 and 69 for a total of 422. Lesher (423) finished one stroke back in a tie for 13th. His rounds were 73, 68, 73, 67, 71and 71. Chris Anderson and Miguel Biamon qualified for the Ben Hogan Tour by reaching the final stage. The top 48 in the final segment earned playing privileges on the PGA Tour and the players who were not in that group qualified for the PGA Tour’s 30 tournament Ben Hogan Tour. Jimmy Booros was also headed to the Ben Hogan Tour, having failed to make it through the qualifying school.

The PGA "Player of the Year" was Corey Pavin and he also topped the money list with earnings of $979,430. Fred Couples led the scoring on the PGA Tour to win the Vardon Trophy with a 69.59 average. Ed Dougherty had a successful year on the PGA Tour as he finished in 86th place on the money list. He played in 36 tournaments and won $201,958. Emlyn Aubrey won $91,257 in 32 events and ended up out of the top 125 in 139th place on the money list. Jimmy Booros (172nd) was also headed back to the qualifying school as he won $53,682 in 30 tournaments. Brett Upper took advantage of his exemptions for having won the 1990 PGA Club Professional Championship and won $18,881 in the six events he was able to enter.

Ted Tryba played 27 tournaments on the PGA Ben Hogan Tour, winning $46,491, which was 16th on the money list. The top five money winners on the 1991 Ben Hogan Tour received PGA Tour cards for the next season.

Mike Hill led the PGA Senior Tour as he earned $1,065,657. Dick Hendrickson had another good year winning $281,863 in 32 tournaments. He finished 22nd on the money list and by being in the top 31 he was fully exempt for the next year. Jack Kiefer won $119,453 in 30 events. He was 54th on the money list and headed back to the qualifying school. Art Wall entered just nine events and won $6,783.

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1992 - On January 3rd Dennis Henderson, the professional at the Buena Vista Country Club, became the Section’s fourth PGA Master Professional. The topic of his thesis was "The Beginning Instructor and the Beginning Student".

In the second week of January Willie Scholl won the PGA Senior Stroke Play Championship at the Estates Course in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. The Estates Course was one of the PGA National Golf Club’s courses but it was not on the main property with the other three courses. The tournament was part of the PGA’s winter tournament program, which was held each January. A course record nine under par 63 in the second round paved the way for Scholl’s win. His rounds were 70, 63 and 68 for a 201 total on the 6,330-yard course. Scholl won $2,450 as he edged out Lynn Rosely (203) by two strokes. Skee Riegel won the 75-79 year-old age group by putting together a 78 and a 79 for 157.

In the second week of April Fred Couples won his only major by winning the Masters Tournament. The story of the tournament happened in Sunday’s final round when Couples tee shot on #12 landed short of the green and stayed on the bank rather than retreating into the water. He saved his par and went on to post a nine under par 275. At the age of 49 Raymond Floyd (277) became the oldest player to finish second at the Masters. Couples rounds were 69, 67, 69 and 70. Corey Pavin was next at 278, two strokes in front of Mark O’Meara (280) and Jeff Sluman (280). First prize was $270,000. There were no players in the field from the Philadelphia Section.


Leo DeGisi
Section President
1992 and 1993
Section Finance Chairman

The Section’s spring meeting was held at the DuPont Country Club on the first Monday of April with more than 300 in attendance. The featured speakers were national President Dick Smith, Sr. and Bob Joyce, our national director from District II. They briefed the members and apprentices on the PGA of America’s affairs. Section President Leo DeGisi and tournament chairman Jim Bromley presented a 60-event tournament schedule which was expected to produce $700,000 in prize money and $600,000 in charitable donations. The tournament committee was dealing with a difficult economy but they had produced more than a ten percent increase in purses over the previous year. A new tournament was the Mike Schmidt Pro-Celebrity Challenge. The pro purse for the one-day event was expected to be $60,000. Another topic of interest was that 575 boy and girls had been members of the Section’s PGA Junior Tour in 1991.

The PGA Seniors’ Championship was held at the PGA National Golf Club, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, in the third week of April. The tournament was played on the Champion Course. Lee Trevino became the tenth professional to win both the PGA Championship and the PGA Seniors’ Championship by holing par saving putts on the last two holes. Trevino’s eight under par second round put him in front of the field by six strokes and he held on to nip Mike Hill (279) by one stroke. Trevino put together rounds of 72, 64, 71 and 71 for his 278 total. First prize was a record $100,000. Chi Chi Rodriquez finished third at 280 and Dave Stockton was next with a 284. Dick Hendrickson led the Philadelphia pros as he tied for 22nd at 295 winning $7,750. Jack Kiefer, Willie School, Bob Thatcher and Bob Pfister, who was now the teaching professional at Muligan’s Driving Range, missed the cut. Hendrickson and Kiefer earned entry into the tournament off their positions on 1991 Senior PGA Tour money list. Scholl, Thatcher and Pfister had earned their entries in December through the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship. The purse was $700,000.

Ted Tryba won the $150,000 PGA Tour Ben Hogan Shreveport Open in Shreveport, Louisiana on the third Sunday of April. The tournament was played at the 6,916-yard Southern Trace Country Club. Tryba put together rounds of 67, 68 and 67 for a fourteen under par 202 total to finish two strokes in front of Skip Kendall (204). Steve Lowery, Paul Trittler, Larry Silveira, Greg Whisman and John Dowdall tied for third with 205s. First prize was $30,000.

On the first Thursday of May Bob Thatcher successfully defended his Philadelphia Section Seniors Championship title at the Reading Country Club. Thatcher and Joe Dahl owned two-thirds of the Reading Country Club. Thatcher’s even par 70 score finished three strokes in front of Ed Kramer (73). Kramer was now the teaching professional at the Brandywine Country Club. The win also qualified Thatcher for the Bell Atlantic Senior Classic. The purse was $1,700 and Thatcher won $374.

Ben Witter led the local qualifying for the U.S. Open in central Pennsylvania on the third Monday of May. The Hershey Country Club’s par 73 West Course hosted 88 pros and amateurs who were vying for seven places in the sectional qualifying. Witter, who had been an assistant at Hershey and was now the head pro at the Fox Chase Golf Club, was the only golfer to finish under par for the day. His rounds of 70 and 75 for 145 were two better than Kimberton Golf Club assistant professional Steve Holauchock (147). Rob Shuey and Brian Kelly, who was playing the mini-tours, picked up the third and fourth spots with 148s. Cleve Coldwater, who was now the professional at the Glenmaura National Golf Club, Francis Vaughn, who was playing the mini-tours, and amateur Mike Banzhoff took the rest of the places with 149 totals.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Philadelphia was held on the third Monday of May. The Rolling Green Golf Club and The Springhaven Club were the host clubs for the Philadelphia area. Frank Dobbs led the scoring for the day with a five under par 65 in the morning at Springhaven and a three over par 74 at Rolling Green in the afternoon. Dobbs’ 139 score gave him a four stroke margin over Gene Fieger who turned in a 143. Greg Farrow and Jim McGovern of northern New Jersey tied for third with 145s. Ed Sabo, Horsham Valley Golf Club assistant professional Andy Barbin and Chris Anderson, who was playing the Ben Hogan Tour, made it safely with 146s. Jimmy Booros, who was also playing the PGA Ben Hogan Tour, and Brett Upper, who was back in the Section as the professional at the new Bent Creek Country Club, tied with two other players at 147 and survived a sudden-death playoff for the last two spots. There were 100 players in the field. No one broke par at Rolling Green and Barbin was the only player who was able to match the par of 71.

Emlyn Aubrey won for the first time on the PGA Tour’s Nike Tour in the third week of May. His win came at the $175,000 Miami Valley Open in Springboro, Ohio at the 6,730-yard Heatherwoode Golf Club. Aubrey began with rounds of 65 and 72. In the third and final round Aubrey (202) made a hole-in-one on the third hole, which propelled him to a six under par 65 and a four-stroke win over Larry Silveria (206). Guy Boros and Omar Uresti tied for third at 207. First prize was $31,500.

Qualifying for the Bell Atlantic Senior Classic was at the Reading Country Club on Monday of tournament week, which was in the third week of May. There were five openings and four players tied for the medal. Jack Kiefer, Snell Lancaster, Bob Reith and Dan Morgan all posted four under par 66s. Sweden’s Claes Johncke earned the last spot with a 67.

After being played at the White Manor Country Club for one year, the Bell Atlantic Senior Classic was back at the Chester Valley Golf Club. The tournament had to find a different home for one year while Chester Valley built a new clubhouse. The host pro was John Poole and the tournament was played at the usual time, the fourth week of May. Lee Trevino arrived at Chester Valley with four wins on the Senior PGA Tour since the first of the year and he was also the leading money winner. He didn’t slow down at the Bell Atlantic Senior. Trevino took a one-stroke lead on Friday with a 65; trailed by one after a 69 on Saturday and earned his fifth win of the year with a 68 on Sunday. His five under par score of 205 nipped Gibby Gilbert (206) by one stroke. Gary Player finished third at 208 and Doug Daiziel was next with a 209. First prize from the $550,000 purse was $82,500. Dick Hendrickson (217) led the Philadelphia pros as he tied for 27th and won $5,070. Jack Kiefer (218) won $$4,079 for a tie for 30th. Art Wall (220) tied for 39th and won $2,755. Bob Thatcher (222) won $1,750 for finishing tied for 49th. Hendrickson and Wall were exempt players on the Senior PGA Tour. Thatcher had a sponsor’s exemption as the Philadelphia Section Senior Champion.

On the second Tuesday of June Frank Dobbs, Brett Upper and Greg Farrow passed the sectional qualifying test for the U.S. Open. They qualified at the Century Country Club in Purchase, New York. Jim McGovern led 67 pros and amateurs by four strokes with a pair of 66s for a ten under par 132. Dobbs and Upper posted 139s to tie for third. Farrow was next at 140 and he was tied with two other players for the last three places. There were eight places to qualify for at Century. They had all qualified locally in Philadelphia. Any pro who was in the top 30 money winners on the PGA Tour from the previous year or the top ten at the end of May in the year of the U.S. Open was exempt.

Gene Fieger won the Burlington Classic at the Burlington Country Club in the middle of June. Fieger (138) shot a four under par 66 on Sunday and hung on with a 72 on Monday to win the $2,075 first prize by two strokes. Gary Hardin and Ken Peyre-Ferry tied for second with 140s. Philadelphia Cricket Club professional Tim Lindemann finished fourth at 141. The total purse was $14,400.

The U.S. Open was played at the Pebble Beach Golf Links in Pebble Beach, California in the third week of June. Pebble Beach was as difficult as ever but the scoring in the early rounds was quite good as scores of 147 and better made the cut. On the last day the winds were up and many of the scores were also. Of the 66 players who played the final round, 20 shot in the 80s. The few that persevered finished at the top of the leaderboard. Tom Kite began the final round in a tie for second just one stroke out of the lead. With the help of five birdies Kite shot an even par 72 and finished at 285, which was two strokes better than Jeff Sluman (287). Kite’s rounds were 71, 72, 70 and 72. Colin Montgomerie finished third at 288. Nick Faldo and Nick Price tied for fourth with 291s. The purse was $1,520,259 and Kite won $275,000. Brett Upper, Frank Dobbs and Greg Farrow who had gotten there through the local and sectional qualifying tests all missed the cut.

John Appleget, the assistant at the Stone Harbor Golf Club, won the Susquehanna Valley Open at the Susquehanna Valley Country Club on the fourth Monday of June. Appleget (140) shot a three under par 67 on Sunday and a 73 on Monday to edge out Gary Hardin (141) by one stroke. Jim Andrews, the assistant at the Lehigh Country Club, finished third with a 142. Rob Shuey and Drew Hood tied for fourth with 143s. Appleget picked up $1,025 from the $6,350 purse.

Qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open was at the Woodcrest Country Club on the fifth Tuesday of June. Frank Arasin, who had returned to where he grew up as the teaching professional at the Tee-to-Green Driving Range, was the medallist with a one over par 72. The players at Woodcrest were competing for four places in the U.S. Senior Open, which was being played at the Saucon Valley Country Club in July. Four players tied for the last three spots with 73s. At the conclusion of play a sudden-death playoff was held. Larry Wise (73), who was now the professional at the Center Valley Club, Bob Ross (73) and Jim Shely (73) a non-PGA pro from northern New Jersey prevailed over Dick Smith, Sr. (73). As the first alternate, Smith was later added to the field. Jack Kiefer was in the U.S. Senior Open off having finished in the top 25 at the 1991 U.S. Senior Open. Dick Hendrickson was invited, as a fully exempt player on the Senior PGA Tour and Art Wall was exempt as a former winner of a major championship, the Masters Tournament along with being a former Ryder Cup Team member.

Roger Stern qualified for the U.S. Senior Open at the Indian Ridge Country Club in Andover, Massachusetts. Stern turned in a three under par 69 to earn medallist honors. There were two spots at Indian Ridge.

Chris Anderson lost a playoff for the Ft. Wayne Open on the Ben Hogan Tour in early July. Anderson (200) won $14,375. Anderson’s rounds were 64, 67 and 69.

Mark Hall, who was the teaching pro at the Maple Dale Country Club, won the Philadelphia Section Assistant Pro Championship on the second Monday of July. The tournament, sponsored by George Izett Golf, was played on Philmont Country Club’s North and South courses. Hall put together two solid rounds of 67 and 69. His four under par 136 brought him in three strokes in front of the defending champion Frank Dobbs (139). Gene Fieger finished third at 142. Hall took home a check for $950 from the $6,300 purse.

In the second week of July Ed Dougherty tied for second at the Anheuser-Busch Classic. The tournament was played at the Kingsmill Golf Club in Williamsburg, Virginia. After rounds of 66, 69 and 66 Dougherty held a one-stroke lead over David Peoples entering the final round. A last round 71 left him tied for second at 272, one stroke out of a playoff. Peoples (271) shot a 69 on Sunday to go with earlier rounds of 66, 69 and 67. Jim Gallagher (272) and Bill Britton (272) also tied for second. First prize was $198,000 and Dougherty along with the other two players who tied for second each won $82,133.

For the second straight week Ed Dougherty finished second in a tour event. This time it was the Chattanooga Classic, which was held during the third week of July in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The winner was Mark Carnevale who posted rounds of 68, 71, 66 and 64 for a 19 under par 269. First prize was $144,000. Dougherty and Dan Forsman tied for second with 271s. They each won $70,400. In the third round Dougherty turned in a course record 62 on the Council Fire Golf & Country Club course. That gave him a four stoke lead on the field but a 71 on Sunday opened the door for Carnevale who came from five strokes off the pace. First prize was $144,000. Dougherty had now won $154,766 for the month of July, which was more than he had won in any one year on the PGA Tour.

The Philadelphia Section pros had a new one-day tournament with a large purse on the schedule. The Mike Schmidt Pro-Celebrity Challenge was played at the Commonwealth National Golf Club in the first week of July. There was a pro-am on Monday with fivesomes composed of Section pros (who were playing for $10,000), celebrities and amateurs. On Tuesday 144 pros from the Philadelphia Section, which included a few invited pros, were paired with 48 celebrities to compete for individual prizes. Ed Sabo put together a solid four under par 67 on the 6,808-yard course to grab the $5,000 top prize. Jay Overton (69) was second earning $3,500. Miguel Biamon, Stu Ingraham and Tony Perla, the teaching professional at the Plymouth Country Club, posted 71s and they each took home $3,075. The purse totaled $50,000. Joe Theismann and Dan Marino led the amateurs in the stableford scoring. Due to the many spectator requests for autographs the Tuesday rounds took more than six hours. The tournament lost money. The paying spectators didn’t show up to see the celebrities like the sponsors expected even thought there were many big names like Michael Jordan and Yogi Berra. One reason for the disappointing attendance was that it was the same time as the first two days of practice for the U.S. Senior Open at Saucon Valley Country Club. The Philadelphia Inquirer and the Daily News sponsored the tournament. The charity was the Special Olympics of Pennsylvania, which received a check for $100,000.

Saucon Valley Country Club hosted the U.S. Senior Open in the second week of July. Saucon Valley’s Old

Course measured 6,700 yards. Larry Laoretti picked the right time to win his first tournament on the PGA Senior Tour as he put together rounds of 68, 72, 67 and 68. His 275 total gave him a four-stroke margin to victory over Jim Colbert (279). Jack Nicklaus, Gary Player, Al Geiberger and Dave Stockton tied for third with four under par 280s. First prize was $130,000. Jack Kiefer tied for eighth with a score of 282 and won $14.468.33. Dick Hendrickson won $3,691 for a tie for 48th at 294. Dick Smith, Sr. (303) tied for 67th and won $2,511.50. Larry Wise, Roger Stern, Frank Arasin and Art Wall missed the cut. Scores of 149 and under made the cut. The tournament drew about 20,000 spectators each day. The host professional was Gene Mattare.

The Philadelphia Open was played at the Philmont Country Club’s North Course on the third Wednesday of July. The tournament was scheduled for two 18-hole rounds that day but after two lengthy delays for lightening and heavy rain play was called for the day. Only nine of the forty-five pros and fifteen amateurs had completed the 36 holes. The Golf Association of Philadelphia made a decision to make it an 18-hole tournament. Four players, Harold Perry and Frank Dobbs along with amateurs Jay Sigel and Chris Lange, were tied for the top spot with two under par 68s. The GAP decided that an 18-hole playoff would be held to determine a winner. Finding a workable date for the four players and Philmont’s busy golf schedule was not easy. The first date that worked for everyone was seven weeks later on the first Saturday of September. The playoff was tightly contested and when the four players reached the 18th tee they were all tied at one over par. They all drove into the fairway and all four were on the green with their second shots. Lange, Perry and Sigel missed their putts for birdies. Dobbs then holed a downhill ten-foot putt for a birdie, an even par 70 and the Philadelphia Open title. Perry had led by two strokes after eleven holes but on number twelve he hooked his tee shot into some trees. After taking an unplayable lie he took an improper drop and was penalized another stroke. First prize was $2,600 and Perry won $2,200 for his second place tie as the other two players were amateurs.

The Tylenol Kids Classic was played on the first Monday and Tuesday of August at the 7.045-yard Commonwealth National Country Club. Twenty-three invited professionals and one amateur, Jay Sigel, were in the field. Also in the field were Ed Dougherty and Miguel Biamon. Biamon was invited as the Philadelphia Section champion. Scott Hoch birdied four of the last five holes to successfully defend his title. He picked up the $50,000 first place check with a 67 and a 65. His 132 total was three better than the runner-up Mac O’Grady (135). Rocco Mediate finished third at 136 and Nick Price was next at 137. The purse was $280,000 and everyone including Biamon (143) and Dougherty (145) picked up at least $7,000. Sigel also had a 143.

Greg Farrow won the Philadelphia PGA Match Play Championship at the PineCrest Country Club in the first week of August. There were 54 pros entered so ten players received byes and 44 played matches in the first round. The competition consisted of six rounds of 18-hole matches. In the finals Farrow earned a hard fought one-up victory over his fellow Burlington Country Club assistant, David Quinn. To reach the final Farrow barely got by the defending champion Ed Sabo in the semifinals with a birdie on the 21st hole. In the other semifinal match Quinn eliminated Gary Hardin 3&1. First prize from the $4,500 purse was $1,500.

Mike Moses won the two-day Pennsylvania Open at the Country Club of Scranton in the second week of August. Moses made seven birdies in the second round and posted a six under par 66. The 66 and a first round 70 gave Moses (136) a one-stroke margin over former Pennsylvania Open champion Joe Boros (137). Rolling Green assistant professional Mike Dynda and Dave Roberts tied for third with 139s. First prize was $3,500 from a purse of $18,500. There was a cut to the low 60 and ties with scores of 76 and under earning the opportunity to play the second round.

In the middle of July the PGA Championship was at the Bellerive Country Club in St. Louis. The Philadelphia Section had four members in the starting field. Ed Dougherty was there as a result of winning enough money on the PGA Tour between the 1991 and 1992 PGA Championships to put him in 68th place as the top 70 on that list received invitations to the tournament. Gene Fieger, Harold Perry and Ed Sabo were in the field for having finished in the top 40 at the PGA Club Professional Championship in October. Nick Price won his first major by posting rounds of 70, 70, 68 and 70 for a 278 total. Price won by three strokes as Nick Faldo, John Cook and Jim Gallagher, Jr. tied for second with 281s. The purse was $1,400,000 and Price took home $280,000. Perry made the cut and finished 83rd with a score of 305, winning $2,175. Dougherty, Fieger and Sabo missed the cut and they each earned the cut money of $1,200.

Frank Dobbs won the Mountain Laurel Classic for the second straight year. The tournament was at the Mountain Laurel Golf Resort in the fourth week of August. The scoring was low and Dobbs’ were lower than everyone else. Dobbs (133) shot a six under par 66 on Monday and a 67 on Tuesday to edge out Gene Fieger (134) by one stroke. Brett Upper was next at 136 and Greg Farrow finished fourth with a 137. The purse was $9,600.


Rick Osberg
1992 Section Champion
Won For a Third Time

For the eighth straight year the Philadelphia Section Championship was held at the 6,759-yard Eagle Lodge Country Club. After six years of Section Championship purses that were in the neighborhood of $100,000 the purse took a hit, as it was now $40,000. Cigna Corporation was still a sponsor but not to the extent that it had been. The tournament was played in the first week of September. In spite of the scaled down purse there was a record entry of 188 Section members. After the second round the field was cut to the low 90 players and ties. With rounds of 70 and 69 two-time Section champion Rick Osberg teed off in the final round holding a one-stroke lead over six players. On the last hole Osberg played a 207-yard three-iron to within ten feet of the hole. From there Osberg (207) two putted for a birdie four and a three under par 68 that edged out Stu Ingraham (208) and Brett Upper (208) by one stroke. On the last hole Ingraham had chipped in from 90-feet for an eagle and Upper had made a birdie after just missing a putt for an eagle. Gary Hardin finished fourth at 209. Five players tied for fifth with 210s as a total of thirteen players finished below par for the three days. First prize was $6,000. Osberg was the eighth player to win the Philadelphia Section Championship more than two times. The host professional was Mike Moses.

Qualifying for the PGA Club Professional Championship took place during the first two rounds of the Section Championship. The first of ten openings went to the new Section champion Rick Osberg. Michael Mack, Dick Smith, Sr., Miguel Biamon and Stu Ingraham tied for second through fifth with 140s. Ed Sabo, Cleve Clearwater and Jim Masserio wrapped up the next three places with 141s. The last two places went to Gary Hardin and Dave Roberts who had posted 142s. Hardin (67) and Roberts (68) beat out several other pros in the tiebreaker, which was the last round of the championship. Brett Upper was exempt as a former winner of the PGA Club Professional Championship. Gene Fieger and Harold Perry were exempt off their finishes in the 1991 tournament.

Qualifying for the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship was also held during the first two rounds of the Section Championship. With his 140 score, Dick Smith, Sr. had pulled off a record setting double by qualifying for both the regular and senior championships. No one had accomplished that feat before. Willie Scholl earned the second spot with a 143 and Bob Pfister won the third and last place with a 145. Bob Thatcher was exempt as the Section senior champion.

The Whitford Golf Classic was played at the Whitford Country Club in the second week of September. The two-day tournament ended in at tie between Gary Hardin (68-72) and Jim Masserio (73-67), which Hardin went on to win in a sudden-death playoff with a birdie on the first extra hole. After Masserio had shot a 33 on the last nine holes to finish at 140 Hardin, who was playing in the last group, birdied his last hole for 140. Hardin picked up a check for $1,950 from the $16,700 purse. Mike Moses (141) finished third and Miguel Biamon (142) ended up in fourth place.

Brett Upper and Gene Fieger were members of the ten-man winning PGA Cup Team. The Kildare Country Club in Dublin, Ireland hosted the matches, which were played against the European PGA Cup Team in the third week of September. The Kildare Country Club, also known as the K-Club, hosted the 2006 Ryder Cup. The first two days there were foursome matches each morning and four-ball matches in the afternoon. The third, and last, day there were ten singles matches. Fieger and Upper were paired as partners for all of the foursomes and better-ball matches and they won all four. They each won their singles match also, thus they contributed six points to the victorious USA team, which won 15 points to 9 for Europe. Upper qualified for the team as the winner of the 1990 PGA Club Professional Championship and Fieger qualified by finishing second in the 1991 PGA Club Professional Championship. The matches were held every two years.

Frank Dobbs won the $10,000 Pennsylvania PGA Championship on the fourth Tuesday of September. The tournament was held at the Scotch Valley Country Club in Altoona. Dobbs opened up on Monday with a 65 and tacked on a 69 on Tuesday for a ten under par score of 134. Jim Cichra and John Mazza tied for second with 138s. Rob Shuey finished fourth at 139 and The Springhaven Club professional Wilson Zehner was next with a 140.

The PGA Club Professional Championship was played in LaQuinta, California on the first four days of October. The PGA West Jack Nicklaus, Mission Hills Old Course and LaQuinta Hotel Mountain Course were used for the tournament. The winner by three strokes was Ron McDougal (273) with rounds of 67, 69, 68 and 69. Sammy Rachels finished second at 276. Jeff Fairfield and Will Frantz tied for third with 278s. First prize was $32,000 and the purse was $400,000. Cleve Coldwater and Stu Ingraham tied for 16th at four under par 284. They each won $5,016.67 as they qualified for the 1993 PGA Championship and the 1993 PGA Club Professional Championship. The top forty players qualified. Gene Fieger (289) missed a chance to qualify for the PGA by one stroke as he tied for 47th and won $891. Jim Masserio (291) tied for 68th and won $689. Dave Roberts (297) and Rick Osberg (297) tied for 95th and they each took home $573. Harold Perry (298) also made the cut and won $563 for a tie at 97th. Miguel Biamon, Gary Hardin, Michael Mack, Brett Upper, Ed Sabo and Dick Smith, Sr. missed the cut and they each received checks for $400.

The Philadelphia Section PGA pros and the Golf Association of Philadelphia amateurs met in a challenge match at the Manufacturers Golf & Country Club on the second Tuesday of October. There were twelve players on each team and each team had at least two seniors. The players were paired in fours and in each pairing there were two singles matches and a four-ball match. In the singles matches Gary Hardin, Mike Moses, Drew Hood, Pete Oakley, Tony Perla, Ken Peyre-Ferry, Roger Stern, Butch Sweigart, now the teaching pro at Mac’s Golf Center driving range, and Noel Caruso, who was now the professional at the Mahoning Valley Country Club, were winners. Dave Roberts halved his match. The teams of Moses-Roberts, Don DeAngelis-Hood, Oakley-Caruso, Perla-Peyre-Ferry and Stern-Sweigart won their matches. The team of Rick Osberg-Hardin halved their match. That made the final tally, 15 points for the pros and 3 for the amateurs.

In mid October Harry Hammond became the Philadelphia Section’s fifth PGA Master Professional. The topic of his thesis was "Computers for the Golf Shop".

The Section’s fall meeting and election of officers was held on the fourth Monday of October at the Hershey’s Mill Country Club. Leo DeGisi-president, Jim Bromley-first vice president, George McNamara-second vice president, Mike Atkins-secretary and Jack MacCarty-treasurer were all reelected without opposition. Charles Genter who had been the professional at the Tavistock Country Club for 22 years was named "Golf Professional of the Year". Genter had served the Section on many committees as well as holding the offices of president, secretary and treasurer. While serving as a district director in early spring of 1985 he had come to the rescue of the Section when he agreed to take over the vacated position of secretary. Genter was the Section secretary for four years and the treasurer for one year. In 1990 he attained the status of PGA Master Professional, the Section’s third. The "Player of the Year" was Gene Fieger and he also won the DeBaufre Trophy by leading the scoring in designated Section events with an average of 70.55. The Section points race was captured by Gary Hardin and he was also the Section’s "Teacher of the Year". The "Skee Riegel Senior Player of the Year" was Roger Stern.

A Philadelphia Section Hall of Fame was created in 1992 and the first class was inducted at the Section’s fall meeting on the fourth Monday of October. Johnny McDermott and Ed Dudley were in the PGA of America Hall of Fame so they were in automatically without a vote of the committee. Leo Fraser, Dick Smith, Sr. and Pete Trenham had been nominated by other Section members and then voted in by the committee. It had been decided to vote in as many as three the first year and a maximum of two each year after that. McDermott’s credentials included back-to-back U.S. Open victories along with other wins in tournaments that are considered equal to today’s PGA Tour events. Dudley played on three Ryder Cup Teams, won PGA Tour tournaments, served seven years as Section president and seven years as president of the PGA of America. Fraser was president of the Philadelphia PGA for six years and president of the PGA of America two years. He owned and operated the Atlantic City Country Club for forty years and he was the great innovator of the Philadelphia Section. He held a women’s national open before the USGA recognized the lady pros and he held senior opens before there was a Senior PGA Tour.

Smith was Section president for three years, president of the PGA of America for two years and a leading player in the Section for twenty years. He won the Section championship five times. Trenham had spent 25 years serving Section and had been a member of every Section committee. He was the Section treasurer for seven years and the Section president for two years. Their bios can be found in the Leaders & Legends chapters that follow the Section history of each decade.

The PGA Senior Club Professional Championship was held at the former PGA National Golf Club’s East Course at the end of October. The facility was now called Ballenisles Country Club and owned by Bud Hansen who put up the money for the Philadelphia Section Hansen Cup points. Roger Kennedy (278) wrapped up the title with rounds of 67, 71, 69 and 71. First prize was $14,000. Next in line were Tom Wargo (280), Dave Philo (281) and Bobby Greenwood (283). Dick Smith, Sr. tied for 25th with a score of 291 and won $1,825. Bob Thatcher (294) and Bob Pfister (294) tied for 34th and they each won $1,250. By finishing in the top 70, Smith, Thatcher and Pfister all qualified for the PGA Senior Championship and the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship in 1993. Willie Scholl missed the cut. The purse was $185,000.

Dick Smith, Sr. stepped down from office as the president of the PGA of America at the national meeting in the first week of November. The Philadelphia Section hosted the meeting in Philadelphia at the Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel. Ted McKenzie was the chairman of the Section committee for hosting the meeting. Gary Schaal moved up from vice president to president and Tom Addis moved from secretary to vice president. They were elected unanimously. Ken Lindsay defeated Guy Wimberly for the office of secretary by the margin of 73 to 33 votes. There were now 13,000 PGA members and 9,000 apprentices. Since 1986 the number of PGA members had increased 37 percent and the number of apprentices had grown by 65 percent. There was no doubt that there were more golf professionals than jobs for golf professionals. The treasurer’s report showed a 4.5 million dollar profit for the last fiscal year. Five new directors were brought onto the board, including Jack Connelly who began a three-year term as a member of the Board of Directors representing District II. District II of the PGA of America was composed of the Metropolitan Section, New Jersey Section and the Philadelphia Section. The three-year director positions rotated through each of the PGA Districts. The delegates had 14 resolutions to debate and as usual some were withdrawn, some were defeated and some passed. One that passed was that apprentices would have to pass the playing ability test during the six months preregistration period. That meant that apprentices could not earn more than six credits toward membership until they passed the playing ability test. Another resolution that passed was that officers would be elected for a two-year term rather than have an election each year. The delegates could have an officer removed if a 50 percent majority of the delegates voted in favor of removal. The Philadelphia Section delegates were Leo DeGisi and Jack MacCarty.

The Section held an education seminar on the first Monday of November. David Brannon, the president of Slazenger Golf, spoke on "Industry Trends and the Changing Golf Business". Gerald Stefanick, from the PGA of America, spoke on the "Wage and Hour" laws.


Bob Thatcher
Played 41 events on PGA Sr. Tour
Section senior champion twice

In the first week of December Bob Thatcher earned conditional status on the PGA Senior Tour by finishing in 15th place at the qualifying tournament. Only the top eight qualifiers earned unconditional status on the Senior Tour. In the final stage at the Mission Hills North Course in Rancho Mirage, California Thatcher posted four straight 72s for an even par 288. The players with conditional status would get into the tournaments when they weren’t filled by the exempt players. The medallist was Larry Gilbert with a 276.

Fred Couples swept all of the honors on the PGA Tour as he was the PGA "Player of the Year", the leading money winner with $1,344,188 and he won the Vardon Trophy with an average of 69.38 strokes per round. Ed Dougherty won $237,525 in 36 tournaments on the PGA Tour, which put him in 66th place on the money list. Greg Lesher finished 145th with earnings of $84,818 in 28 events. Emlyn Aubrey also played in 28 events and finished 167th with $58,087. Aubrey also played in two tournaments on the Ben Hogan Tour where he won $1,763. Lesher and Aubrey were headed back to the PGA Tour qualifying school.

Ted Tryba won $105,952 in 28 tournaments on the PGA Ben Hogan Tour. That put him in fourth place on the money list and earned him playing status on the PGA Tour for 1993. A third place finish in the final event of the year at Fresno, California made the difference. The top five earned their privileges. Chris Anderson played in 21 events and finished 71st on the money list with $17,813. Jimmy Booros won $1,373 in the six tournaments he was able to get into and Gene Fieger won $850 in four tournaments.

Lee Trevino led the PGA Senior Tour as he won $1,027,002. Dick Hendrickson won $270,025 in 36 tournaments, which was just enough to put him in 31st place on the money list. The top 31 on the money list were fully exempt for the next year. Jack Kiefer wasn’t fully exempt but he got into 18 events and won $203,095 to finish 36th in earnings. Walter Morgan played in 29 events and finished 59th with $101,037. Art Wall played in 14 tournaments and won $12,013. Bob Thatcher played in two tournaments and won $1,750.

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1993 - Bob Pfister won the rain-shortened PGA Quarter Century Club Championship in the first week of January. The two-day tournament for PGA members who had been PGA members for at least 25 years was shortened to one round due to a total rain out of the second day. Pfister posted a three under par 69 on the PGA National Golf Club’s Estate Course. Pfister earned $1,500 for winning the tournament and he picked up another check of $800 for winning his age group of 50-54. His nearest competitors were Roland Stafford, Robert Nichols and Nick Berkich who all finished with 70s on the par-72 course.

The Section’s spring meeting was held at the DuPont Country Club on the first Monday of April. More than 350 PGA members and apprentices were in attendance. The biggest news may have been that the Section Championship was moving to Conestoga Country Club after having been held at the Eagle Lodge Country Club for eight straight years. Tournament Chairman Jim Bromley announced that the Section’s Tournament Director Tom Carpus was leaving to take over the head pro position at the Greate Bay Country Club. Bob Korbel, who had been working in the tournaments at the national office, had been hired to replace him. President Leo DeGisi told the members that the PGA Tour’s second tour, which was now called the PGA Nike Tour, was holding its White Rose Classic at the Honey Run Golf Club in early July. The Nike Tour was formerly called the Ben Hogan Tour. DeGisi also reported that the Section’s budget for the year was now $1.4 million.

The Masters Tournament was played at its usual time, the first full week of April. Bernhard Langer won the Masters for a second time by putting together rounds of 68, 70, 69 and 70 for an eleven under par 277. In the last round Langer made an eagle three on #13 and a birdie four on #15 to finish four strokes in front of Chip Beck (281). First prize was $306,000. John Daly, Tom Lehman, Steve Elkington and Lanny Watkins tied for third with 283s. There were no players associated with the Philadelphia Section entered in the tournament. There were 90 players in the starting field.

A club professional named Tom Wargo won the PGA Seniors’ Championship in the third week of April. Wargo had qualified for the tournament by finishing second at the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship in late October. The tournament was played on the PGA National Golf Club’s Champion Course in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. Wargo posted rounds of 69-69-67-70 for a nine under par 275 and then had to beat Bruce Crampton (73-67-69-66--275) in a sudden-death playoff. On the first playoff hole (the par four #16) Wargo and Crampton halved the hole in with pars and Wargo won it with a par three on the nest hole (#17) after Crampton had put his tee shot in the pond to the right of the green. First prize was $110,000. Isao Aoki finished third at 279 as Bob Charles and Tom Weiskopf tied for fourth with 281s. Dick Hendrickson (290) tied for 27th and won $6,500. Jack Kiefer (296) tied for 45th, winning $2,062.50. Dick Smith, Sr., Bob Pfister, who was now the professional at the Rock Manor Golf Club, and missed Bob Thatcher the cut. Hendrickson and Kiefer were in the tournament off their positions on the Senior PGA Tour money list. Like Wargo Smith, Pfister and Thatcher had qualified by finishing in the top 70 at the 1992 PGA Senior Club Professional Championship.

Bob Pfister won the Section Senior Championship at the Reading Country Club on the first Thursday of May. Pfister had to go overtime to get the win as he and Bob Thatcher had finished in a tie with one under par 69s. The win qualified Pfister for the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship and the Bell Atlantic Senior Classic, which was coming up in two weeks. North Hills Country Club professional Ron Rolfe and John Carson, who was now the teaching professional at the McCall Field Golf Club, tied for third with 70s. The purse was $1,700.

The Section Match Play Championship was played at the PineCrest Country Club in the second week of May. Pete Oakley, who was now the teaching professional at the Rehoboth Driving Range, added another title to a long list by winning five matches over a three-day period (Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday). The finals went into extra holes before Oakley got past Chris Anderson with a par on the 20th hole. Anderson, who was now the teaching professional at the Delcastle Golf Club, had tied up the match when his second shot on #18, which was played from the rough, finished two feet from the hole. In the morning semifinal match Anderson eliminated Michael Mack 4&3 and with the help of a front nine 30 Oakley had put out Dave Roberts 7&5. Anderson was back in competition after taking a break from the tournament grind. In the late fall Anderson had failed to pass the PGA Tour qualifying test for a ninth time so he had put his clubs in a closet and didn’t touch them for four months.

The Senior PGA Tour was at the Chester Valley Country Club for the PGA Bell Atlantic Senior Classic again. After two days of pro-ams the $650,000 main event teed off on the third Friday of May. Lee Trevino failed to hold a lead that he took into the final round, which was a rarity, and Bob Charles grabbed the title. Charles’ rounds were 67, 67 and 70 for a six under par 204. Charles picked up a check for $97,500, which made him the first person to pass four million dollars in winnings on the Senior PGA Tour. This was his seventh year on that tour. Dave Stockton finished second at 205. Trevino had slipped to a 72 in the last round and along with the two who passed him three more caught him. Trevino, Bob Murphy, Dave Hill and Jim Colbert all tied for third with 206s. Jack Kiefer tied for 15th with a 214 and won $11,375. Dick Hendrickson (217) won $6,354 for a tie 24th. Dick Smith, Sr. (219), who was now the professional at the Galloway National Golf Club, tied for 35th and won $3,534. Bob Thatcher (220) won $2,275 by tying for 43rd. Bob Pfister (233) finished near the end of the 78-man field and won $390. Jack Nicklaus played in the tournament for the first time and with the aid of only one of the pro-ams for practice he tied for 28th at 218. Hendrickson was in the tournament as exempt players on the Senior PGA Tour. Thatcher was in the field off his partial exempt status on the Senior PGA Tour. Smith and Thatcher were there on sponsor’s exemptions. Pfister had earned his spot by winning the Philadelphia Section Senior Championship. The host professional was John Poole.

Emlyn Aubrey, who was back on the PGA’s Nike Tour, won the Miami Valley Open on the fourth Sunday of May. The tournament was held at the 6,730-yard Heatherwoode Golf Club in Springboro, Ohio. Aubrey put together rounds of 65, 72 and 65. His eleven under par 202 total gave him a four stroke margin of victory over Larry Silveira (206). In the final round Aubrey aced the par three third hole with a 5-iron shot and never looked back. Guy Boros (207) and Omar Uresti (207) tied for third. First prize from the $175,000 purse was $31,500.

On the fourth Monday of May Nike Tour member Greg Lesher and Len Mattiace, who was playing the PGA Tour, captured the first two spots at the central Pennsylvania U.S. Open local qualifying test. Lesher (140) posted rounds of 73-67 and Mattiace (140) shot a morning 66 and an afternoon 74. The par 72 Blue Mountain Golf Club hosted the event. Hershey Country Club assistant professional Paul Oglesby finished third at 142 and Steve Holauchock was next with a 143. The last two of the six places allotted to that qualifying site were won by Blue Mountain Country Club professional Don Lowe (147) and Joe Donnelly (147) in a three-man playoff that lasted just one hole. Lowe made a birdie and Donnelly made a par to qualify.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Philadelphia was held at the St. Davids Golf Club and the Gulph Mills Golf Club on the fourth Tuesday of May. Chris Anderson won the medal and the right to move on to sectional qualifying by posting a one over par 72 at Gulph Mills in the morning and a three under par 68 in the afternoon at St. Davids. His 140 total led three players by two strokes. Somerton Springs Driving Range teaching professional Craig Dear, Rick Osberg and Brett Upper tied for second with 142s. Ed Sabo, Greg Farrow, Gene Fieger and Carl Lohren were next at 143. The ninth and last spot went to Frank Dobbs, who was home from the PGA’s Nike Tour. Dobbs had to hole a ten-foot putt for a par on the 18th hole at St. Davids to finish at 144. That allowed him to finish one stroke in front of six players who were at 145.

Country Club of York assistant professional David "Moose" Brown made it through the local qualifying for the U.S. Open at the Towson Golf & Country Club near Baltimore, Maryland. There were nine spots at Towson. Erick Egloff led with a 138 and a 145 won the last spot. Brown shot a 142 that tied for fourth.

The PGA Tour’s second tour, which was now called the Nike Tour, had scheduled an event in the Philadelphia Section at the Honey Run Golf Club. The tournament was called the White Rose Classic. The PGA Tour had set aside sixteen places in the tournament field for Philadelphia Section members and qualifying for the spots was held at the Kennett Square Golf & Country Club on the first Monday of June. Brett Upper, who had played the PGA Tour for five years in the 1980s, led the qualifying with a five under par 66. Whitemarsh Valley Country Club assistant professional Orist Wells finished second with a 67. Stu Ingraham, Middletown Country Club assistant professional Keith Devos and Brian Kelly, who was now the teaching professional at the White Deer Golf Club, tied for third with 68s. Lebanon Country Club assistant professional Jim Douglass was next with a 69. Jim Masserio, Drew Hood and Terry Hertzog made it safely with 70s. The last seven places went to Delcastle Golf Club professional Bill Hackett, Gene Fieger, Dave Roberts, Pete Oakley, Harold Perry, Ken Peyre-Ferry and Green Pond Golf Club professional Jim Muschlitz who all posted 71s to make it right on the number without any playoffs. Bob Kave (72) and the teaching professional at the Maple Dale Country Club Larry Jones (72) were the first and second alternates. They got into the tournament when Masserio and Douglass dropped out. Frank Dobbs, Jim Furyk, Greg Lesher and Emlyn Aubrey were exempt as members of the Nike Tour. Rick Osberg was exempt as the Section champion and Steve Chronister was exempt as the host professional at Honey Run but he didn’t enter the tournament.

David "Moose" Brown qualified for the U.S. Open at the Sharon Golf Club in Sharon, Ohio on the first Monday of June. There were 32 players shooting for three qualifying spots at Sharon. Kevin Burton won the first spot with a three under par 141. The other two places went to Brown (71-71) and Mark Balen who tied at 142.

Gene Fieger qualified for the U.S. Open in New York on the second Tuesday of June. Qualifying was held at the Century Country Club and the Old Oaks Country Club. There were 142 pros and amateurs vying for 28 openings in the starting field at the Open. Fifty-two of the professionals were from the PGA Tour, which was in Harrison, New York that week for the Buick Classic. Fieger posted a three under par 68 in the morning at Century and came back in the afternoon with a two over par 72 at Old Oaks. His 140 total got him under the wire by two strokes. Five players who had posted 142 played off for the last three spots. Mike Donald was the medallist with a 135.

Two days later in June Gene Fieger was still on his game as he won the two-day Variety Club Tournament of Champions at the White Manor Country Club. The first day only the professionals played and the second day the pros played with three amateurs for pro-am money as well. Fieger put together a 67 the first day and a 71 the second day for a six under par 138. Dave Roberts and John Owens tied for second with 140s. Brett Upper and Stu Ingraham were next at 142.

The Variety Club was formed in Pittsburgh in 1927 to aid physically disabled children. The Philadelphia Section had been conducting a pro-am tournament in conjunction with the Variety Club since 1976, but in the spring of 1993 they took on a new challenge. Five Section members teamed up with five of the Variety Club’s disabled children to teach them golf. They met at the White Manor Country Club for golf lessons. The program was called the "Buddy Program" and the five professionals were Rick Osberg, Doug Hendricks, Mike Moses, Chris Anderson and Jim Masserio.

The U.S. Open was at the Baltusrol Golf Club in Springfield, New Jersey in the third week of June. Baltusrol was a course where many of the U.S. Open records had been set and this year was no exception. Lee Janzen tied a Jack Nicklaus record for the first 36 holes by posting a pair of 67s. A 69 in the third round put him at 203 and tied the record for the lowest 54-hole score at the U.S. Open. Another 69 in the last round put him at 272, which tied the record score that Nicklaus had set in 1980, also at Baltusrol. Janzen was just the second person to play all four rounds in the 60s. In spite of the record scores he couldn’t shake Payne Stewart until he birdied two of the last three holes. Stewart finished just two strokes back at 274. Paul Azinger and Craig Parry tied for third with 277s. The total purse was $1,714,234 and first prize was $290,000. Gene Fieger and David "Moose" Brown missed the cut. They each received $1,000 as the pros that didn’t complete 72 holes each won that amount.

For a second straight year the Mike Schmidt Pro-Celebrity Challenge was played at the Commonwealth National Golf Club. The tournament played on the fourth Monday of June was again sponsored by the Philadelphia Inquirer and the Daily News. Each pairing was made up of two professionals and two celebrities. John Owens took the top money of $5,100 with a three under par 68. The total purse was $34,000. Chris Anderson, Pete Oakley, Miguel Biamon and Billy Ziobro tied for second with 69s. The tournament was not a financial success as several of the major celebrities withdrew at the last minute.

Qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open was held at the Doylestown Country Club on the fifth Tuesday of June. There were 43 players competing for two spots in the starting field in Denver. The first spot went to Butch Sweigart who turned in a two under par 70 and the next spot was won by Bob Thatcher with a 72. The only playoff needed was for alternate spots.

Open qualifying for the PGA Nike Tour’s White Rose Classic was held on the fifth Monday of June at the Outdoor Country Club. Don Bell led the qualifying for fourteen spots with a five under par 66. All of the players who shot a 71 or better qualified. Lancaster’s Jim Furyk who was playing the Nike Tour as a Monday qualifier had an exemption from the tournament sponsor.

The Nike Tour, which was the PGA Tour’s second tour, held the $200,000 White Rose Classic at the Honey Run Golf Club in the first week of July. Many future and past PGA Tour members were playing that tour in an attempt to earn fully exempt status on the 1994 PGA Tour. Curt Byrum won by putting together four solid rounds of 69, 70, 64 and 67 for an eighteen under par 270. First prize was $36,000. Estaban Toledo, Morris Hatalsky and Gary Rusnak all posted 271 totals to tie for second just one stroke off the pace. Rusnak had eight straight birdies over the second and third rounds. The second round had three long rain delays and only 21 players completed their rounds. The rest finished on Saturday morning. Frank Dobbs led the Philadelphia Section members with a 276. Dobbs tied for 21st and won $2,100. With the help of a third round 63 Harold Perry won $1,704 as he posted a 277 to tie for 24th. When the field teed off on Sunday for the final round Perry was tied for second just two strokes out of the lead. A 75 in the final round dropped him 22 places on the money list, which was a testimonial to strength of the Nike Tour. Gene Fieger (280) won $660 for a tie for 45th and Jim Furyk (282) tied for 51st winning $480. Drew Hood finished 58th at 287 and won $360. Cleve Coldwater, Emlyn Aubrey, Bob Kave, Rick Osberg, Brian Kelly, who was now the teaching professional at the White Deer Golf Club, Larry Jones, Pete Oakley, Brett Upper, Jim Muschlitz, Dave Roberts, Greg Lesher, Bill Hackett, Orist Wells, Keith Devos, Stu Ingraham, Terry Hertzog and Ken Peyre-Ferry missed the cut. Dobbs and Aubrey were Kike Tour members. Furyk had an exemption from the sponsor. Lesher was playing on both the PGA Tour and the Nike Tour. The others had qualified locally. The host professional Steve Chronister was instrumental in bringing the tournament to his club and the Philadelphia Section.

Greg Farrow won the Burlington Classic at the Burlington Country Club on the second Monday of July. Farrow put together two solid rounds of golf with a 67 on Sunday and a 66 on Monday for a seven under par 133 to win by four strokes. Dave Roberts and Ed Sabo tied for second with 137s. Harold Perry and Stu Ingraham were next at 138. The purse was $15,450.

The U.S. Senior Open was at the Cherry Hills Country Club near Denver in the second week of July. Jack Nicklaus was now winning major senior championships and he added another at Cherry Hills. His rounds were 68, 73, 67 and 70 for a six under par 278 total. In the last round Tom Weiskopf made a charge with a 30 on the front nine but two bogies on the back side gave him a 67 and left him one stroke out of a tie at 279. Kermit Zarley (280) finished third one stroke in front of Chi Chi Rodriquez (281) and Dale Douglass (281). The golf course measured 6,915 yards but in Colorado’s high altitude it played much shorter. First prize from the $750,000 purse was $135,330. Bob Thatcher (304) tied for 55th and won $3,764. Bob Pfister missed the cut. Thatcher and Pfister had qualified in Philadelphia.

The Philadelphia Open was played at the Huntingdon Valley Country Club on the second Wednesday of July. Once again the tournament was plagued by rain. The tournament was scheduled for 36 holes on one day but after being interrupted twice by rain the Golf Association of Philadelphia decided to call it a one round tournament. Gene Fieger was able to complete one round before the second rain delay and he had a three under par 67 on the scoreboard. Several players had a chance to catch him but they all failed. Fieger picked up the Philadelphia Open title and a check for $2,680. The purse was $13,860. Jack Connelly, Jim Masserio and amateur Jim Spagnola tied for second with 68s. Miguel Biamon finished fifth with a 69.

Paul Ogelsby won the Philadelphia Section Assistant Pro Championship on the fourth Monday of July. The tournament sponsored by George Izett Golf, was held at the Burlington Country Club and the Laurel Creek Country Club. Ogelsby toured the Burlington course in three under par 67 and then put together a one under par 70 in the afternoon at Laurel Creek. His 137 score won by three strokes over Conestoga Country Club assistant John Cooper (140). There was a five-way tie for third as Greg Farrow, John Owens, Brian Kelly, Chris Anderson and Gene Fieger all posted 141s.

In the fourth week of July Scott Hoch won the Tylenol Kids Classic for the third straight year. Everything was the same except the golf course as the White Manor Country Club was hosting the event that year. Hoch posted a 68 on Monday and a 67 on Tuesday for a nine under par 135. Hoch birdied three of the last seven holes to win by three strokes. Tom Lehman finished second at 138. Kirk Triplett, Gary McCord, Steve Pate and Steve Lamontagne tied for third with 139s. As the Philadelphia Section PGA champion Rick Osberg was invited and he posted a 143. Osberg tied for 15th and won $6,400. Ed Dougherty was also in the 24-man field and he posted a 149, winning the minimum prize of $6,000. Hoch won $50,000 to bring his winnings for the last three years in the tournament to $145,000. The purse was $280,000.

Jim Furyk won on the PGA Tour’s Nike Tour in the first day of August at the Mississippi Gulf Coast Classic. The tournament was played at the 6,705-yard Windance Golf & Country Club in Gulfport, Mississippi. Furyk (72-68-66) finished with four straight birdies to tie Bob Friend (70-66-70) at 206. In the sudden-death playoff that followed Furyk made another birdie on the first playoff hole to win the $27,000 first prize. The total purse was $150,000. J.P. Hayes was next at 209. Kim Young and Tommy Moore tied for fourth at 210.

Qualifying for the PGA Club Professional Championship was at the North Hills Country Club on the first Monday of August. Jimmy Booros, who was now the professional at the Whitetail Golf Club, earned the medallist honors with a 68 and a 66 for the two rounds. Booros (134) finished three strokes in front of Miguel Biamon (137). Gary Hardin, Greg Farrow, Pete Oakley and Brian Kelly tied for third with 138s. Dave Roberts picked up the seventh spot with a 141, which finished one stroke in front of George Forster, Sr. (142). Forster, Sr. won the eighth and last spot in a sudden-death playoff. In September Jim Masserio also qualified by winning Section Championship. Brett Upper was exempt as a past champion of the tournament. Stu Ingraham and Cleve Coldwater were exempt for having finished in the top 40 the year before.

The Section’s senior members also qualified for the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship at North Hills Country Club on the first Monday of August. There were two spots to qualify for and Butch Sweigart took the first one with a 74 in the morning and a 68 in the afternoon for an even par 142. The second spot went to Roger Stern who posted a 145. John Carson (148) eliminated Stan Dudas (148), who was leasing the Mays Landing Golf Club, and Henry McQuiston (148) in a sudden-death playoff for the first alternate position and when the Section was awarded another place he wound up in the starting field. Bob Pfister had qualified earlier by winning the Section Senior Championship in May.

The Pennsylvania Open was in the western part of the state and most of the prizes stayed there. The par 70 Allegheny Country Club hosted the tournament in the second week of August. Bob Ford beat John Klincholk with a birdie on the first hole of a sudden-death playoff. Ford (68-66) and Klincholk (68-66) tied with 134s. Klincholk had eight birdies in the last round, which included each of the last four holes. Sean Farren finished third at 135. John Mazza and Bernie Di Loreto tied for fourth with 136s. The low pro from the Philadelphia Section was Brett Upper who tied for eight with a 139. The course measured 6,402 yards.

The PGA Championship was at the Inverness Club in Toledo, Ohio in the middle of August. Paul Azinger won by beating Greg Norman on the second hole of a sudden-death playoff. Azinger (69-66-69-68) birdied four of the last seven holes to tie Norman (68-68-67-69) at eight under par 272.On the second extra-hole Azinger two putted for a par and Norman lipped out a four-foot par putt from above the hole. First prize was $300,000 from a $1,700,000 purse. Nick Faldo finished third at 273 and Vijay Singh was fourth with a 274. Stu Ingraham (283) played well as he tied for 31st and finished the tournament as the low club professional. Ingraham won $7,057.69. Cleve Coldwater missed the cut. Ingraham and Coldwater had qualified for the tournament by finishing in the top 40 at the 1992 PGA Club Professional Championship.

Brett Upper won the two-day Mountain Laurel Classic on the last day of August. The $11,025 tournament was hosted and sponsored by the Mountain Laurel Resort. Upper earned $1,600 by posting a 69 and a 66. His nine under par 135 gave him a one stroke win over Pete Oakley and Harold Perry who tied for second with 136s. Frank Dobbs finished fourth with a 139.

Harold Perry won the two-day Whitford Classic in the second week of September. Perry put together a 68 and a 67 for a nine under par 135 to win by three strokes. Don DeAngelis finished second with a 138 and Brett Upper was next at 139. Gene Fieger finished fourth with a 140 total. The purse was $16,700.


Jim Masserio
1993 Section Champion

After eight straight years at the Eagle Lodge Country Club the Section Championship moved to the central counties region of the Section. The championship was hosted by the Conestoga Country Club in the third week of September. Jim Masserio won the $6,000 first prize by overtaking Stu Ingraham (134) and Frank Dobbs (134) with a three under par 67 in the last round. Masserio put together rounds of 66, 70 and 67 for a seven under par 203 to win the Section Championship for a second time. Ingraham finished second with a 205. Dobbs and Gary Hardin tied for third with 206s. Gene Fieger and Miguel Biamon were next at 207. The total payout was $40,000. The host professional was Drew Hood.

The Pennsylvania PGA Championship was played at the Scotch Valley Country Club in Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania in the third week of September. The Philadelphia Section Championship had ended on Friday and this tournament began on the next Monday so the entry from the eastern part of the state was somewhat limited. Dick Von Tacky (138) posted a 70 and a 68 to finish with a six under par score that won by four strokes. Bob Ford and Jim Cichra tied for second with 142s. Llanerch Country Club assistant professional Jim Curran, Frank Dobbs and Gordon Vietmeier tied for fourth with 143s. The course measured 6,786 yards and the purse was $10,750.

On the fifth Wednesday of September the Philadelphia Section pros squared off against the Golf Association of Philadelphia amateurs at the Philadelphia Cricket Club’s Flourtown Course. Each team was made up of two senior players and ten others. The players were paired in fours with two amateurs and two pros in each pairing. Each pairing featured two singles matches and a better-ball match. The pros edged out the amateurs in what was the most closely contested match in its three-year history. In the better-ball matches the professional teams of Pete Oakley-Ed Sabo and John DiMarco-Russ Davis won. The Jim Masserio-George Forster, Sr. team halved its match. In the singles matches Oakley, Sabo, Masserio, Forster, Sr., DiMarco, Davis and senior Butch Sweigart won. That left the professionals with 9 ½ points against 8 ½ for the amateurs and the slimmest margin of victory. The other members of the Philadelphia Section team were Dave Roberts, Chris Anderson, Frank Dobbs, Don DeAngelis and senior Bob Pfister. The pros now led the series of matches with three wins to none for the amateurs but it was only a matter of time before the amateurs won.

The PGA Club Professional Championship was back in the east at the PGA Resort and Spa, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. The tournament was played during the second week of October on the Champion, Haig and Squire courses. The Philadelphia Section was well represented as Pete Oakley tied for third and six other Section members made the cut. There were five rain delays in the first three rounds. Jeff Roth took the title with rounds of 68, 69, 66 and 72 for a thirteen under par 275. John Lee finished second at 277. Oakley, Todd Smith, George Bowman, Walt Chapman and Ron McDougal tied for third with 278s. First prize was $32,000 and Oakley won $12,800. Miguel Biamon tied for 31st at 284 and won $1,580. He was in a ten-way tie, which meant that the 284 scorers won the last ten of the 40 places allotted to the PGA club professionals for the 1994 PGA Championship. Biamon and Oakley were in the PGA. Brian Kelly (287) and Greg Farrow (287) tied for 59th and they each won $760. Cleve Coldwater won $665 as he tied for 70th at 288. Gary Hardin and Stu Ingraham both made the cut but did not play their fourth rounds. The each won $400, which was what the players who didn’t make the cut received. George Forster, Sr., Dave Roberts, Jim Masserio, Jimmy Booros and Brett Upper missed the cut. The purse was $400,000.


Mike Atkins
"Golf Professional of the Year"

The Section’s fall meeting and election of officers was at the Hershey Country Club on the fourth Monday of October. Jack MacCarty was the new Section president, George McNamara moved from second vice president to secretary, Mike Atkins moved from secretary to treasurer, Michael Mack was elected vice president tournaments and Drew Hood was the new vice president of section affairs. Atkins was named "Golf Professional of the Year". In 1982 and 1984 Atkins was the "Golf Professional of the Year" in the Sun Country PGA and he was president of the Sun Country PGA for 1982 through 1984. Atkins was one of the pros that were responsible for the formation of the Central Counties Chapter under the Philadelphia PGA umbrella. He had served as an officer in the Central Counties Chapter and the Philadelphia Section. Gene Fieger was the Section’s "Player of the Year", led the Section points race and he won the DeBaufre Trophy with a 69.85 stroke average. The "Skee Riegel Senior Player of the Year" was Bob Pfister. The Section’s "Teacher of the Year" was Ted Sheftic. It was the second time that Sheftic had won the award.

Skee Riegel and Fred Byrod were inducted into the Philadelphia PGA Hall of Fame on the fourth Monday of October. The induction ceremony took place at the Section’s fall meeting at the Hershey Country Club. Riegel was almost 24when he hit his first golf ball but nine years later he won the U.S. Amateur and went on to play on two Walker Cup Teams where he won every match. He turned pro in 1950 and finished second in the 1951 Masters Tournament. At the age of 39 he left the PGA Tour and returned home to Philadelphia as the pro at the Radnor Valley Country Club. He then won the Pennsylvania Open twice and a Philadelphia Open. For over 30 years he was a member of the Section’s tournament committee and the chairman of the rules committee. He spent numerous hours helping to make the Section members more knowledgeable on the rules of golf. In 1975 he received the Horton Smith award for work he did in the education of the Section members and apprentices. Byrod graduated from Temple University in 1933 and began writing sports for the Philadelphia Inquirer that year. In 1959 he became the Inquirer’s sports editor. In his early years of writing sports Byrod wasn’t very interested in golf but it later became his main interest. He covered 69 major golf championships for the Inquirer and was well liked by all of the tour stars from Byron Nelson to Ben Hogan, Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus. After he retired from the Inquirer he wrote for the Philadelphia Golf Magazine while still writing a weekly golf column for the Inquirer. Byrod was a walking encyclopedia on golf in Philadelphia and he went out of his way to include the Philadelphia Section and its members in the Inquirer’s sports pages. For sixty years he did more to inform the public about the Philadelphia PGA and its members than all of the other sports writers combined.

The PGA Senior Club Professional Championship was played in late October at the Ibis Golf & Country Club’s Legend Course, West Palm Beach, Florida. Bob Carson ran away from the field by putting together rounds of 69, 69, 69 and 70 for an eleven under par 277. Tom Joyce finished eight strokes back in second place with a 285. Bill Garrett (287) and Patrick O’Brien (288) finished third and fourth. First prize was $14,000. Bob Pfister (299) tied for 37th and won $1,200. Butch Sweigart won $1,032.50 (300) for a 40th place tie. Roger Stern (301) tied for 44th and won $922. Pfister, Sweigart and Stern qualified for the PGA Senior Championship as the top 55 made it. The number of qualifiers out of this tournament for the PGA Senior Championship had been reduced from 70 to 55. John Carson missed the cut by one stroke.

The PGA National Resort & Spa in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida hosted the national PGA meeting, in the first week of November. The delegates from the Philadelphia Section were Jack MacCarty and Mike Atkins. The biggest news at the meeting was that the PGA had obtained an option to purchase the Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville, Kentucky. A part of the agreement was that the 1996 PGA Championship would be played there. It was also announced that the PGA had an agreement to build another golf facility in Florida, which would have 36 holes and a learning center. The courses were going to be designed by Tom Fazio. One important resolution that passed was that a resolution could be voted on without waiting for the annual meeting. The board of directors could now propose a resolution. The resolution would then be mailed to the PGA Sections. A vote would be taken within 45 days and it would require a vote of two-thirds in favor by both the board and the Sections to pass. The A-6 classification was expanded to include PGA members employed at PGA recognized indoor golf facilities. Also in attendance were past national president Dick Smith, Sr. and District II national director Jack Connelly.


John Poole
Bill Strausbaugh Award
national winner

John Poole was recognized at the PGA of America’s national meeting in November as the winner of the Bill Strausbaugh Award for his work in Club Relations. Poole was the pioneer in the Philadelphia Section when it came to club relations. He became involved with the new club relations committee in the late 1978 and in 1982 he accepted the chairmanship of the committee. He was the chairman from 1982 through 1991 where he counseled 105 club committees in the hiring of new professionals. He won the Strausbaugh Award in the Section six times. He had been a member of the national club relations committee since 1985.

Nick Price was the leading money winner for the year on the PGA Tour and he won the two major awards as well. He was the PGA "Player of the Year", won the Vardon Trophy with a stroke average of 69.11 and took home $1,478.557. Ed Dougherty had a so-so year on the PGA Tour, but beginning with the New England Classic he made nine straight cuts. He played in 34 events and ended the year in 99th place with $167,651. Late in the year Ted Tryba tied for third at the Walt Disney World Golf Classic and won $52,800. That boosted him up into the all-exempt top 125 on the money list. He played in 33 tournaments and finished the year in 116th place with $136,670. Tryba also won $1,894 in one tournament on the PGA Nike Tour. Greg Lesher played in 14 tournaments and won $23,171. Lesher also played in eleven tournaments on the Nike Tour where he earned $1,105.

Emlyn Aubrey was back on the PGA Nike Tour (formerly the PGA Ben Hogan Tour) where he won $72,944 in fourteen tournaments. He was 14th on the money list which qualified him for a return to the PGA Tour. He also played in one tournament on the PGA Tour where he won $18,125. In his first full year as a professional golfer Jim Furyk played in 25 tournaments on the Nike Tour and won $58,240. He finished 26th on the money list. Furyk was less than $3,000 away from finishing in 25th place, which would have qualified him for the PGA Tour. Frank Dobbs played in ten events and won $2,100.

Dave Stockton led the PGA Senior Tour money list with $1,175,944. Jack Kiefer broke through a barrier by winning enough money to lock up full exempt status for the next year. He played in 32 events and won $333,511, which was 27th place on the money list. Dick Hendrickson completed another year as he played in 34 tournaments, winning $243,262, which put him in 35th place on the money list. Bob Thatcher got into 19 tournaments as a conditional qualifier and won $37,119. The introduction of super-senior money brought Al Besselink out of retirement. He played in six tournaments and won $1,748 plus the super-senior money.

Jim Furyk qualified for the PGA Tour in the first week of December. They made it through the six-round qualifying school, which was held at the La Quinta Resort’s Dunes Course in La Quinta, California. Three players tied for medallist honors. Ty Armstrong, Dave Stockton, Jr. and Robin Freeman all finished with 415 totals. Furyk tied for 37th with rounds of 70, 71, 74, 71, 69 and 71 for 426. There were 40 spots and Furyk was one of ten players who just made it. There are no playoffs at the Q-School and all ties for the last spot are included.

In the second week of December longtime amateur Jay Sigel turned pro and entered the qualifying test for the PGA Senior Tour. Like most seniors who were trying to get on the Senior Tour he had to survive two 72-hole qualifying events in order to earn playing privileges. At the final stage a player had to finish in the top eight in order to fully qualified for 1994 PGA Senior Tour. The entry fee was $2,000. Sigel finished eleventh in qualifying as he posted rounds of 75, 75, 73 and 70 for a five over par 293 at the Grenelefe Resort in Haines City, Florida. In each of the first three rounds he hit a ball out-of-bounds. Sigel won $2,730, his first money in golf, but that wasn’t important. The important thing was that he had qualified for the Senior Tour. Only the top eight qualifiers earned full exemptions to the tour, but the second eight had conditional status. This meant that beginning with the player who qualified in the ninth position, the eight players with conditional status would be able to play when the fields weren’t filled with the fully exempt players.

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Jay Sigel
Won Early in His Rookie Year
on the PGA Senior Tour

1994 - It didn’t take Jay Sigel long to win his first tournament on the PGA Senior Tour. In just the fourth full field event of the year Sigel came from ten strokes back to win the GTE West Seniors Classic. The tournament was played at the Ojai Valley Inn and Country Club in the first week of March. Lee Trevino had told Sigel that the Ojai course, which was only 6,200 yards, was too short for the strengths of his game. Never the less Sigel was there and after rounds of 70 and 66 he trailed Jim Colbert by ten strokes. When he teed off in the final round he was fighting a stomach virus and he had a new caddy on his bag that week. He was just hoping to earn a decent check before taking an all night flight home to Philadelphia. Sigel proceeded to put together a course record eight under par 62 for a total of 198, which caught Colbert. A sudden-death playoff began on the par three 17th hole. After they halved the hole with pars they went to the par five 18th hole where they both had putts of about four-feet for birdies. Colbert missed his putt and Sigel holed his for the victory and a check for $82,500. Larry Laoretti and Bob Murphy tied for third with 199s. Sigel was now an exempt player on the PGA Senior Tour.

The Section’s spring meeting was held at the DuPont Country Club on the first Monday of April. The spring meeting was held at DuPont several times because the club had more than one 18-hole course. The Section usually held some kind of a pro-pro event after the morning meeting and with the Section now having so many members two courses were needed to take care of everyone that wanted to play in the event. There were over 300 members, apprentices, staff and guests at the meeting. Section President Jack MacCarty informed those present that Drew Hood had resigned as the vice president of section affairs and that the Penn Oaks Country Club professional, Mike Cole, had been appointed to replace him. The tournament chairman, Michael Mack, briefed the Section members and apprentices on the tournament schedule. There were several new tournaments on the schedule and the schedule had an estimated $565,000 in purses. The PGA Nike Tour was back in the Section for another year as it was holding a tournament at the Center Valley Club. The Variety Club was represented by Vince Marieniello, who was the moving force behind the relationship between the Philadelphia Section and the Variety Club. For several years Marieniello had been attending the meetings with the purpose of selling the Variety Club charity to the Section members but this time he had Russell Ohneck, a member of the one-year-old Buddy Program, with him. Russell gave a riveting talk on what the program meant to him. One thing he said was "My professional is Doug Hendricks and he’s teaching me how to play golf". The Section Secretary George McNamara reported that as of March 31 the PGA of America had 14,292 members. Of that number 2,114 were Life Members, which was the retired classification.

The Masters Tournament ended on the second Sunday of April with another Spaniard at the top of the leader board. Jose Maria Olazabal opened with a 74 but then he posted rounds of 67, 69 and 69 for a nine under par 279 to edge out Tom Lehman (281) by two strokes. First prize was $360,000. Larry Mize (282) and Tom Kite (283) finished third and fourth. There was no one in the field from the Philadelphia Section.

The PGA Seniors’ Championship was played in mid April and it was held at the PGA National Golf Club for the thirteenth straight year. Raymond Floyd blew a four-stroke lead on the last nine holes and Lee Trevino (279) was there to grab the win. That gave Trevino two PGA Seniors’ Championship wins in the last three years. Floyd (282) was done in by the two par three holes on the back nine, #15 and #17. He lost four strokes to par on #15 and two more on #17 to finish three strokes off the pace. Trevino only used 108 putts to put together four steady rounds of 70, 69, 70 and 70. Jim Colbert finished second at 280 and Dave Stockton (282) tied Floyd for third. Jay Sigel (288) finished thirteenth and won $15,000. Dick Hendrickson (292) won $11,000 as he tied for 19th. Jack Kiefer (294) tied for 29th and won $4,250. Mike’s Indoor Golf teaching professional Butch Sweigart, Bob Pfister and Roger Stern missed the cut and they were each paid $750. First prize was $115,000 from a purse of $850,000. The course measured 6,702 yards. Sigel had gained entry into the tournament off his position on the 1994 Senior PGA Tour money list through April 1. Hendrickson and Kiefer were exempt off their positions on the 1993 Senior PGA Tour money list. Sweigart, Pfister and Stern earned their entry through the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship by finishing in the top 55.

St. Davids Golf Club professional Pete Trenham won the Philadelphia Section Senior Championship at the Little Mill Country Club on the second Tuesday of May. He posted a one under par 70 to finish four strokes in front of Tony Perla, (74), who was now the teaching professional at the Plymouth Country Club. Wild Quail Golf & Country Club teaching professional Joe Kriznuski, Dick Smith, Sr. and Freeway Golf Club professional Bill Bishop tied for third with 75s. The victory earned Trenham an exemption for the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship and an invitation to the Bell Atlantic Senior Classic. The purse was $1,350 and first prize was $325.

The Blue Ridge Country Club hosted the central Pennsylvania local qualifying round for the U.S. Open on the fourth Monday of May. For a second time the USGA had decided to reduce the local qualifying from 36 holes to 18. It had been tried in 1989 but in 1990 local qualifying was back to 36 holes. Now with more than 6,000 entries it was becoming difficult to find enough courses and officials to manage two rounds of qualifying in one day at various sites around the country. There were 66 pros and amateurs competing at Blue Ridge. Many locations required two courses. Sixty-five players were fully exempt into the U.S. Open and 170 were exempt from local qualifying. The low qualifier for the six places allotted to Blue Ridge was Paul Oglesby who posted a three under par 69. Amateur Jonathon Clark finished second with a 71 and Wilson Zehner (73), who was now the professional at the Lancaster Country Club, won the next spot in spite of hitting two balls out-of-bounds on one hole. There was a seven-way tie at 74 for the last three places. The survivors were Rob Shuey, the teaching professional at the Bent Creek Country Club, Jim Douglass and Outdoor Country Club assistant professional Robert Ruby.

Local qualifying in Philadelphia for the U.S. Open was held at the Commonwealth National Country Club on the fourth Tuesday of May. There were 120 pros and amateurs entered in Philadelphia but even though it was a warm sunny day there were 20 withdrawals and no shows. Philadelphia had been allotted twelve spots for the right to move on to sectional qualifying. In order to get the players around what was a difficult test, the course was set up at 6,774 yards. That was about 270 yards less than the full course yardage but the last players still needed five hours and 20 minutes to complete their rounds. The rough was deep and the slick greens became firmer as the day progressed. Garrison’s Lake Golf Club teaching professional Pete Oakley, Rick Osberg and Bob Menne tied for medallist honors with one under par 70s. Stu Ingraham was fourth with a 71, his assistant Gene Fieger was fifth with a 72 and Brett Upper was next at 73. The host professional David Craig birdied the 18th hole for a 74, which put him in a playoff with six other players for the last six spots. Craig, Miguel Biamon (74), Pine Valley Golf Club assistant professional Jason Lamp (74), Wilmington Country Club assistant professional Daniel Volko (74) along with amateurs Jeff Kiley (74) and Chris Lange (74) survived the sudden-death playoff by making pars on the first extra hole. Jim Furyk was exempt from local qualifying as an exempt player on the PGA Tour.

The tenth Bell Atlantic Senior Classic was back at the Chester Valley Country Club at the end of May. Qualifying for the last four places in the starting field was at the Reading Country Club on the Monday of tournament week. Agim Bardha led with a five under par 65. The next two spots went to Rod Curl (66) and Walter Morgan (66) who was a Philadelphia Section member. He was living in Cherry Hill, New Jersey where his wife had a job as a school administrator. The first day was cold and windy but then the weather returned to the normal for late spring. Lee Trevino won on the PGA Senior Tour for the 22nd time and the fourth time that year. Trevino (206) won the tournament for a second time with rounds of 71, 67 and 68, which was four under par. Mike Hill finished second at 208 and Tommy Aaron was third with a 210. Tom Wargo, Jim Dent and Chi Chi Rodriguez tied for fourth with 211s. Jack Kiefer tied for seventh with a 212 and won $23,800. Jay Sigel (219) won $6,230 for a tie for 26th. Morgan (221) tied for 34th and won $4,050. Dick Smith, Sr. (222) tied for 41st and won $3,080. Bob Thatcher (223) won 2,450 as he tied for 47th. Pete Trenham (234) tied for 70th and won $616. Dick Hendrickson withdrew after the first round with a pinched nerve in his neck. There were 78 in the starting field. Kiefer, Sigel and Hendrickson were in the field off their standing on the Senior PGA Tour. Smith and Thatcher, who was back at his Olde Masters Driving Range, had received sponsor exemptions. Trenham was in the field as the current Philadelphia Section senior champion. That year Chester Valley was the second most difficult course on the Senior PGA Tour. The host professional was John Poole. Trevino won $105,000 from the $700,000 purse. The admission fee for spectators was $18 each day.

Jim Furyk and amateur Duke Delcher qualified for the U.S. Open in the Washington D.C. area. Qualifying was held at the Congressional Country Club’s Gold Course and the Woodmont Country Club’s North Course on the second Monday of June. The PGA Tour’s Kemper Open had concluded the day before so there were 142 players qualifying for 39 spots. Delcher was a former Section member now playing out of the Atlantic City Country Club. Furyk put together a 65 and a 73 for 138 and Delcher shot 73 and 66 for 139. Bradley Hughes was low with a 131. Fourteen players with 140 totals went into a sudden-death playoff for the last five spots.

Emlyn Aubrey also qualified for the U.S. Open on the second Monday of June. He was in Cincinnati, Ohio at the Coldstream Country Club competing with 38 players for three spots in the starting field at the Oakmont Country Club. Aubrey was the low qualifier as he put together rounds of 66 and 69 for a seven under par 135. Frank Lickliter and Steven Flesch took the other two places with 138s. Aubrey was exempt from local qualifying as a member of the PGA’s Nike Tour.

Gene Fieger won the Variety Club Tournament of Champions at the White Manor Country Club in the second week of June. The first round was played on a Thursday in a pro-am format. The amateur entry fees went to the Variety Club charities. On Friday the pros were paired by their Thursday scores. Frank Dobbs, who was now the teaching professional at the Blue Bell Country Club, led the first day with a 68 but the second day Fieger made eight birdies on the way to an eight under par 64. Fieger’s 64 and a Thursday 71 gave him a total of 135. Dobbs finished second with a 138. Stu Ingraham, Pete Oakley and Harold Perry tied for third with 140s. The purse was $27,750.

Qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open was at the Reading Country Club on the third Friday of June. There were two places to qualify for. Bob Pfister and Dick Howell, a professional from northern New Jersey, took two spots with two under par 68s. Larry Wise won the first alternate spot with a 69 and later got into the tournament. Jay Sigel was in the tournament on a special invitation from the USGA. Jack Kiefer was exempt off his position on the PGA Senior Tour money list.

The U.S. Open was played at the Oakmont Country Club near Pittsburgh in the third week of June. Oakmont played as difficult as usual and at the end of regulation play there were three players tied at the top. Ernie Els (69-71-66-73), Colin Montgomerie (71-65-73-70) and Loren Roberts (76-69-64-70) all posted one under par 279s. On Monday the USGA held its usual 18-hole playoff to break the tie. Els and Roberts turned in 74s and Montgomerie’s 78 eliminated him. A sudden-death playoff between Els and Roberts was next and it began on the 10th hole to accommodate TV. They both made par4s on #10 and Els took the title with a par 4 on the next hole. Curtis Strange finished fourth alone with four consecutive 70s for 280. First prize was $320,000 from a purse of $1,752,835. Jim Furyk tied for 28th at 292 and won $11,514.20. Emlyn Aubrey (302) also made the cut as he tied for 62nd and won $3,800.33. Duke Delcher missed the cut.

Rob Shuey won the Burlington Classic at the Burlington Country Club on the fourth Monday of June. Shuey put together a 65 on Sunday and he came back with a 66 the next day to post a six under par 134. Pete Oakley finished second with a 135 total. Jim Curran and Frank Dobbs tied for third at 137. The purse was $17,000.

The U.S. Senior Open was played at the Pinehurst Resort and Country Club’s #2 course in the beginning of July. South Africa’s Simon Hobday took home the title with rounds of 66, 67, 66 and 75 for a twelve under par 274. Hobday only won by one stroke as Graham Marsh and Jim Albus tied for second with 275 totals. Tom Weiskopf, Tom Wargo and Dave Stockton tied for fourth with 277s. First prize was $145,000. Jack Kiefer tied for 25th with a 288 total and won $6,589. Bob Pfister tied for 65th and won $1,978. Larry Wise missed the cut.

The George Izett Memorial Assistant Pro Championship was held on the first Monday of July. The tournament was played at the North Hills Country Club and the Cedarbrook Country Club. Greg Farrow put together a one under par 71 at Cedarbrook in the morning and a four under par 67 at North Hills in the afternoon to take the title. His score of 138 nipped Frank Dobbs (139) by one stroke. Dave Seeman (142), the teaching pro at the Wilmington Country Club, finished third and Jim Curran (143) was fourth. The total purse was $8,500. There was now a George Izett memorial trophy and Farrow’s name was engraved on the trophy.

Stu Ingraham won the Philadelphia Open in a playoff with Harold Perry on the third Tuesday of July. Ingraham (71-65—136) and Perry (65-71—136) the host professional at the Kennett Square Golf & Country Club had finished in a tie at the end of 36-holes the previous Wednesday. In the playoff Ingraham turned in a four under par 67 against a 72 for Perry. The 136 scores tied a Philadelphia Open record. Since 1940 when the tournament was shortened from 72-holes to 36-holes, only four other players had posted 136s. They were Bud Lewis, Gene Kunes, Jay Sigel and amateur Billy Hyndman. First prize was $2,620 from a purse of $12,600. Gary Hardin finished third at 137. Mike Moses and Jim Masserio were next with 138s. Eleven players broke 140 and seventeen broke par. Rob Shuey, Brian Kelly, Gene Fieger, Pete Oakley, 57-year old Pete Trenham and amateur Chet Walsh all posted 139s. Earlier qualifying rounds had established a starting field of 45 professionals and 15 amateurs.

The Section members qualified for the PGA Club Professional Championship on the first Monday of August at the Kennett Square Golf & Country Club. The first of seven openings went to Charlie Bolling, who was now the teaching professional at the Bent Creek Country Club. He turned in a 69 in the morning and a 65 in the afternoon for an eight under par 134. Jim Masserio finished second with a 137. The next three spots went to Brian Kelly (138), Stu Ingraham (138) and Gary Hardin (138). Miguel Biamon and Bob Kave took the last two places with 139s. Pete Oakley was exempt off his third place finish in the tournament the year before. Brett Upper was exempt as a former winner of the tournament. When Frank Dobbs won the Section Championship in September he qualified also.

The Section’s senior members also qualified at the Kennett Square Golf & Country Club for the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship on the first Monday of August. The seniors had three spots to qualify for. Dick Smith, Sr. and Willie Scholl tied for the medal with 143s. Dennis Milne won the third spot with a 144. Pete Trenham was exempt as the Section senior champion.

Paul Oglesby won the Pennsylvania Open at the Bent Creek Country Club on the second Tuesday of August. Ogelsby came from five strokes back to win by four. He opened up with a one under par 70 on Monday and came back with a course record (30-34) 64 on Tuesday. His 134 score gave him a comfortable margin of victory over Gene Fieger who finished second at 138. First prize was $4,000 from a purse of $21,600. The first round leader Ned Weaver ended up in third place with a 139. Brian Kelly and Gulph Mills Golf Club teaching professional Terry Hertzog tied for fourth with 140s.

In the second week of August Nick Price broke all of the PGA Championship records as he captured the title for the second time in three years. The tournament was held at the Southern Hills Country Club in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Price won by six strokes as he put together rounds of 67, 65, 70 and 67 for an eleven under par 269. It was the lowest 72-hole score in the tournament since the format had been changed from match play in 1958. The purse was $1,700,000 and first prize was $310,000. Corey Pavin finished second at 275 and Phil Mickelson was next at 276. Greg Norman, Nick Faldo and John Cook tied for fourth with 277s. Ted Tryba, Pete Oakley and Miguel Biamon missed the cut and they each received $1,200. Tryba was in the field for having been in the top 70 money winners on the PGA Tour money list from the 1993 PGA Championship through June 18, 1994. Oakley and Biamon were there for having finished in the top 40 at the PGA Club Professional Championship.


Pete Oakley
1994 PGA Cup Team Member

Frank Dobbs won the Mountain Laurel Classic on the fifth Tuesday of August. The tournament was played at the par 72 Mountain Laurel Resort. Dobbs’ rounds of 71 on Monday and 67 on Tuesday for 138 gave him a one stroke victory over Pete Oakley (139). Miguel Biamon finished third at 140 and Ben Witter was next at 143. The purse for the tournament was $11,740.

The $14,500 Whitford Classic was played in the second week of September at the Whitford Country Club. Stu Ingraham left everyone in his wake as he led by two strokes after shooting a 68 on Sunday and then he shot a 67 on Monday for a nine under par 135. Frank Dobbs and Gary Hardin tied for second with 142 totals. Pine Valley Golf Club assistant professional Marc Carter, Brett Upper, Miguel Biamon, Ken Peyre-Ferry and Terry Hertzog tied for fourth at 143.

Pete Oakley wasn’t available for the Philadelphia Section Championship because he was playing in the PGA Cup Matches at Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. As the immediate past president of the PGA of America, Dick Smith, Sr. captained the team, which was competing against the European PGA club professionals. The matches were played on the PGA National Golf Club’s Champion Course in the third week of September. The first two days there were four foursomes matches in the morning and four four-ball matches in the afternoon. In those two days Oakley won a four-ball match, lost in the two foursomes matches and sat out the other four-ball match. In the four-ball match that Oakley won, he holed a twenty-foot birdie putt on the last hole to save a 1-up edge. The Americans led 9 to 7 after the second day’s matches were completed. Smith reminded his team that no American team had lost on home soil. On the third day there were ten singles matches. Oakley brought in one of the first wins as he played three under par golf and won by 6&5. The Americans won five more singles matches and finished on top with 15 points against 11 for Europe. The PGA of America now led the series with eleven victories against four wins for Europe. Two of the contests had ended in a draw.


Frank Dobbs
1994 Section Champion

After having won almost everything else in the Philadelphia Section Frank Dobbs won the Philadelphia PGA Championship on the fourth Thursday of September. The Conestoga Country Club hosted the tournament for the second straight year. In the end the tournament came down to Dobbs and Michael Mack. While Dobbs waited in the rain on the 18th fairway Mack three putted the 18th green for a three-day total of four under par 206 (69-69-68). When the green cleared Dobbs hit an eight-iron to within ten feet of the hole. He then holed the putt for a birdie and a total of 205, which gave him a one-stroke victory. Dobbs’ rounds were 66, 68 and 71. The purse was $40,000 and Dobbs won $6,000. Stu Ingraham and Terry Hertzog tied for third with 208s. Five players tied for fifth with even par 210s. The host professional was John O’Malley.

On the first Tuesday of October the Golf Association of Philadelphia’s amateurs defeated the Philadelphia Section professionals. The pros had won the first three challenge matches contested against the amateurs. A plausible reason for this loss was that ten of the Section’s best players were in Missouri for the PGA Club Professional Championship. The matches were held at the Green Valley Country Club. There were twelve pros and twelve amateurs on each team. Two members of each team were seniors. In each four-man pairing there were two singles matches and a better-ball match. The final score was 11 ½ points for the amateurs and 6 ½ points for the pros. Ken Peyre-Ferry, Dave Roberts, Orist Wells and Butch Sweigart won their singles matches. The teams of George Forster, Sr.-Wells and John Carson-Sweigart won their better-ball matches. The Vince Ramagli-Roberts team halved their match. Ramagli was the teaching professional at the Bumble Bee Hollow Driving Range. The other members of the Philadelphia Section team were Rob Shuey, Chris Anderson, Michael Mack, John DiMarco and Don DeAngelis who was now the professional at the Blue Bell Country Club.

The PGA Club Professional Championship was in Lake Ozark, Missouri in early October. The tournament was played at the North Port National Golf Club, Robert Trent Jones, Sr. Course and the Oaks Course. The tournament ended in a three-way tie as Sammy Rachels, Darrell Kestner and Ron McDougal all finished regulation play with 284 totals. A sudden-death playoff was held at the completion of play. McDougal went out on the first hole and Rachels won with a par on the second extra hole. Rachel’s rounds were 68, 72, 71 and 73. The tournament was delayed by rain. It began on the first Thursday of the month and due to rain it took five days to complete as it finished on Monday. Some players needed three days to play their second round. Bruce Zabriski finished fourth at 285. First prize from the $400,000 purse was $32,000. Pete Oakley and Frank Dobbs tied for 13th with 288 totals and they each won $5,458. They also qualified for the 1995 PGA Championship as the top 25 made it. The number of players qualifying for the PGA Championship had been reduced from 40 to 25. Brian Kelly missed qualifying for the PGA Championship by one stroke as he posted a 290. Kelly tied for 26th and won $2,059.09. Jim Masserio (292) tied for 44th and won $946.67. Stu Ingraham (293) won for a 53rd place tie. Bob Kave (297) finished tied for 77th and won $655. Brett Upper made the cut right on the number with a 222 and withdrew. Charlie Bolling, Gary Hardin and Miguel Biamon missed the cut. Upper and everyone who missed the cut received checks for $400.

In the third week of October the PGA Senior Club Professional Championship was held in West Palm Beach, Florida. The tournament was played on the Ibis Golf & Country Club’s Legend Course and the starting field had been reduced from 144 to 129. Roger Kennedy won the tournament for a second time with rounds of 72, 69, 70 and 72 for a five under par 283. Bill Garrett finished second at 284, Patrick O’Brien was third at 286 and Tom Joyce finished fourth at 287. First prize from the $185,000 purse was $14,000. Dick Smith, Sr. tied for 12th with a 293 total and won $3,016.66. Pete Trenham tied for 37th at 303 and picked up a check for $720. That qualified Smith and Trenham for the 1995 PGA Seniors’ Championship as the top 55 made it. Willie Scholl and Dennis Milne missed the cut.


Jack Kiefer
Won 1971 PA Open
Two Wins on PGA Senior Tour

Jack Kiefer won on the PGA Senior Tour for the first time by shooting a 63 in the last round at the Ralph’s Senior Classic. The tournament was played in Los Angeles, California at the Rancho Park Golf Club during the fourth week of October. This was the same course that hosted the Los Angeles Open on the PGA Tour for many years. Kiefer had joined the Senior PGA Tour in 1990. Kiefer needed the 63 because Dale Douglass was putting together a ten under par 61 at the same time. Douglas’ 61 was a course record and it also equaled the lowest round in the history of the PGA Senior Tour. Kiefer (69-65-63) finished with a three round total of 197 and Douglass’ total was 198. First prize was $112,500. Jim Colbert finished third at 201. Bob Murphy, Tony Jacklin, Ben Smith, Jim Dent, Jimmy Powell and Kermit Zarley tied for fourth with 202 totals. Jay Sigel shot a 202 and tied for tenth winning $17,250.

In the fourth week of October Frank Dobbs became the holder of both the Philadelphia Section Match Play Championship and the Philadelphia Section Championship titles. To win the Match Play title Dobbs beat Ken Peyre-Ferry by 5&4 in the finals. The tournament was played at the PineCrest Country Club. On Monday Gary Hardin led the qualifying for the match play ladder with a three under par 67. Thirty-one players and Pete Oakley, who was exempt as the defending champion, qualified for the matches. The first round matches were also played on Monday. Two matches were played on Tuesday with the semifinals and finals being played on Wednesday. In the semifinals Dobbs played four under par golf to defeat Gene Fieger 2-down. Peyre-Ferry needed three extra holes to eliminate Pinelands Golf Club assistant professional John Appleget in the other semifinal match. The purse was $3,100.

The PGA of America’s annual meeting was held during the first week of November at the Ommi Hotel at Charleston Place in Charleston, South Carolina. The theme of the meeting was "PGA 2000", which meant what would be the make up of the PGA professional in the year 2000 and after. Tom Addis was unanimously elected as the 29th president of the PGA and Ken Lindsay moved up to vice president. The Carolinas PGA Section’s Will Mann was elected secretary on the first ballot in a three-man race with Ron Dunham and Jerry Ray. Several resolutions were passed. Credits for a four-year college degree were increased from 8 to 12. Apprentices who where working for a non member head professional who was in the PGA apprentice program would now receive one credit for each month worked instead of one-half credit. A classification was established for PGA members who were directing a PGA Recognized Golf School at a PGA Recognized Golf Range. Apprentices would be required to make acceptable progress in their training as defined by the Board of Directors or be dropped from the Apprentice Program. The delegates from the Philadelphia Section were Jack MacCarty and Mike Atkins. Dick Smith, Sr. was also in attendance as a past president of the PGA and Jack Connelly was there as the national director representing District II.


Don Siok
"Golf Professional of the Year"
1994

Seaview Country Club hosted the Section’s fall meeting on the second Monday of November. The president Jack MacCarty and all of the other officers were reelected. The other officers were Secretary-George McNamara, Treasurer-Mike Atkins, Vice President Tournaments-Michael Mack and Vice President Section Affairs-Michael Cole. The "Golf Professional of the Year" was Atlantic Country Club professional Don Siok. He was a founder of the Central Counties Chapter and he had been a Section member for more than 30 years. Siok served as the treasurer for two years and the secretary one year. As the secretary he and the Section attorney, Francis Sullivan, created new By-Laws for the Section. Siok and his father-in-law Leo Fraser were always ready to host tournaments and meetings for the Section. The "Player of the Year" was Frank Dobbs. It was the third time that he had achieved that award. Stu Ingraham won the DeBaufre Trophy with a 70.00 scoring average for the year’s designated tournaments. The "Skee Riegel Senior Player of the Year" was Butch Sweigart. The Section’s "Teacher of the Year" was Russell Davis.


Marty Lyons
Section President Six Years
PGA of America Secretary

Marty Lyons was inducted into the Philadelphia Section PGA Hall of Fame on the second Monday of November. The ceremony took place at the Seaview Country Club during the Section’s fall meeting. Lyons began his career in golf at the age of nine as a caddy at Llanerch Country Club and he worked his way up the ladder at the club. At the age of 16 he became the caddy master and two years later he was the assistant pro. He left for six years to work in south Jersey as a head professional. In 1933 Lyons returned to Llanerch as the assistant to Denny Shute. That year Shute won the British Open and moved on to another club job at the end of the year. With the backing of almost every member Lyons moved into the head professional position, where he remained until his death 35 years later. Lyons was so revered by the Llanerch members and even though his induction to the Section’s Hall of Fame was 26 years after his death a large contingent of Llanerch members rented a bus and made the trip to Seaview for the ceremony. His accomplishments are almost endless. Lyons hosted the Section Championship nine times. He was president of the Section for six years and he was the vice president for four years. He was the secretary of the PGA of America for one year. Lyons, Leo Fraser and Jimmy D’Angelo were the first PGA members to put forth the idea of the PGA having its own golf course in Florida and it was the three of them that made it happen. Through his efforts on the national level the PGA Championship was played at Llanerch Country Club in 1958. It was also Lyons who campaigned to change the PGA Championship from match play to stroke play. The 1958 PGA Championship was played at stroke play for the first time and the tournament became a huge financial success. Lyons was one of the early promoters of junior golf, using movies of their swings to peak their interest. When the wounded veterans from World War II began returning to the Valley Forge Hospital Lyons promoted the construction of a golf course at the hospital. He and the Section’s professionals spent many hours introducing the wounded veterans to golf. Just a few days before Lyons died in 1968 he had said "With Valley Forge Hospital getting all these wounded boys from Vietnam, we’ve got to get busy up there again".

Walt Morgan qualified for the PGA Senior Tour in the third week of November. Qualifying was held at the par 71 TPC of Tampa Bay in Lutz, Florida. Morgan finished second at (72-71-68-69) 280, just two strokes back of the medallist Tommy Aycock (74-66-69-69—278). The top eight earned full exemptions on the Senior Tour and the next eight players earned conditional status. Morgan also picked up a check for $8,400. The course measured 6,638-yards.


Emlyn Aubrey
2 Wins on Asian Tour
2 Wins on PGA Nike Tour

The PGA "Player of the Year" was Nick Price and he led in money won with $1,499,927. Greg Norman won the Vardon Trophy with an average of 68.81 strokes per round. Ted Tryba finished 74th on the PGA Tour money list. He earned $246,481 in the 34 tournaments he entered. Jim Furyk made the most of his first year on the PGA Tour as he played in 31 tournaments, won $236,603 and finished 78th on the money list. Furyk also won $3,815 in a tournament on the PGA Nike Tour. Ed Dougherty failed to hold on to his full exempt status on the PGA Tour. He finished the year in 157th place on the money list with earnings of $96,987 in 33 events. Dougherty then failed to make it through the second stage of tour qualifying. He had been exempt from level one qualifying. In spite of losing his exemption Dougherty would be able to enter some of the tournaments due to having made at least 150 cuts during his career. Emlyn Aubrey finished tenth on the PGA Nike Tour, which qualified him for the 1995 PGA Tour. He won $113,919 in the 19 tournaments that he entered. Aubrey also won $3,802 in a tournament on the PGA Tour.

For the second straight year Dave Stockton led the PGA Senior Tour as he won $1,402,519. In his first year on the PGA Senior Tour Jay Sigel lived up to his amateur record by finishing 12th on the money list. He had fourteen top ten finishes and he won the GTE West Seniors Classic, which earned him "Rookie of the Year" honors. Sigel’s victory early in the year made him a fully exempt and he went on to win $634,130 in 29 tournaments. Jack Kiefer won his first tournament on the PGA Senior Tour and went on to finish 21st on the money list. His earnings in the 35 tournaments he entered came to $532,467. Dick Hendrickson slipped to 51st on the money list as he earned $153,155 in 31 events. Roger Stern played in three tournaments and won $8,198. Bob Thatcher got into two tournaments and won $5,998. Al Besselink played in three tournaments and won $1,166 along with his super-senior earnings.

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