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A Chronicle of the Philadelphia Section PGA and Golf in the Philadelphia Area
by Peter C. Trenham
1980 to 1989
Contents

1980 The Section had another first as the new Senior PGA Tour held its first event at the Atlantic City CC in June.
1981 Dick Smith, Sr. won the 60th Philadelphia PGA Section Championship at the Cavaliers Country Club in October.
1982 Dick Smith, Sr. won his fourth Philadelphia PGA Section Championship at Huntingdon Valley C.C. in September.
1983 Charlie Bolling won the South African Open in late January.
1984 Rick Osberg tied for third in the PGA Club Professional Championship in October.
1985 Ed Dougherty won the PGA Club Professional Championship in October.
1986 In December Dick Smith, Sr. was elected secretary of the PGA of America at the national meeting in Indianapolis.
1987 The Philadelphia pros defeated the Middle Atlantic Section to make it 12 wins for Philadelphia against 6 losses.
1988 The Philadelphia PGA Section Championship prize money was $100,000 for the first time.
1989 In April Jimmy Booros won on the PGA Tour at the Deposit Guaranty Golf Classic.

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1980 -A new decade began with golf booming. The PGA Tour purses were rapidly increasing and most of the tournaments were televised. There were concerns that there was too much golf being shown on TV. Playing the PGA Tour was a distant thought for most club pros. People were retiring earlier and more women were taking up the game so the rounds of golf were increasing each year. Senior golf was becoming very popular and the Philadelphia Section was in on another first, as the Atlantic City Country Club would host the first official tournament of the new Senior PGA Tour.


Edward “Tim” DeBaufre
Section President 1981 & 1982
Won 1976 Philadelphia Open

Nearly 300 Section members and apprentices attended the spring meeting of the Philadelphia Section at the Concord Country Club on the first Monday of April. The New Jersey PGA Section’s Harry Dee, national vice-president from District II, was in attendance to bring the members up to date on the national association’s affairs. The first vice president and tournament chairman, Tim DeBaufre, presented a tournament schedule of 70 events with purses estimated to add up to $265,000. Through the efforts of Executive Director Jack Klein and DeBaufre, the professional at the Woodcrest Country Club, purses had increased by two hundred and fifty percent in two years. Twelve of the events that were open to all Section members and played as individual open tournaments would determine who played on the Challenge Cup team along with the "Player of the Year" and the winner of the DeBaufre Trophy. The professional at the Meadia Heights Golf Club and Section junior golf chairman, Doug Ritter, announced that Junior Golf Week would be held again on the second week of July. The PGA of America now had 8,308 PGA members and 3,950 apprentices.

In the first full week of April the Masters Tournament was played for 44th time at the Augusta National Golf Club. Seve Ballesteros opened up with a 66 and a tie for the lead and followed up with rounds of 69, 68 and 72. He led all the way and took a ten-stroke lead into the final nine. He then made a bogey on #10, put his tee shot in Rae’s Creek on #12 for a double-bogey five and made a bogey six on the next hole when he put his second shot into Rae’s Creek. He had now lost four strokes to par in four holes and seven shots to his playing partner Jack Newton who had birdied holes 11, 12 and 13. From there Ballesteros (275) played the last five holes in one under par to finish four strokes in front of Newton (279) and Gibby Gilbert (279). At age 23 Ballesteros became the youngest winner of the Masters and his 23 birdies set a record. One stroke farther back Hubert Green finished fourth at 280. First prize was $55,000. Jay Sigel was the low amateur with a 289 total, which gave him a tie for 26th. Former Masters winner Art Wall (300), who was now playing the Senior PGA Tour, also made the cut. He finished 51st and won $1,500.

The third annual Legends of Golf Tournament was played at the Onion Creek Country Club in Austin, Texas in the last week of April. Art Wall and his partner Tommy Bolt added some more money to their retirement funds by winning the tournament with a record score of 187, twenty-one under par. Wall and Bolt had finished second the year before. They opened up the first day with a better-ball of 60 but it only got them a tie at the top of the leader board with the team of Sam Snead and Don January. On a windy second day Snead and January posted another 60 for a three-stroke lead over Wall and Bolt (60-63). It seemed like the course was playing easy, but only for the leaders, as the second place team was nine strokes in front of the third place team after two rounds. On Sunday Wall and Bolt got off to a fast start and the Snead-January team didn’t. When Wall birdied holes 8 through 10 his team took a two-stroke lead and the tournament was practically over. Wall and Bolt finished with a 64 to win by two strokes over Snead and January (189). Their 187 score broke the tournament record by six strokes and they each collected a check for $35,000 from the $400,000 purse. It was the largest check that Wall had ever won and $9,000 more than he had received for winning the 1975 Milwaukee Open. Arnold Palmer and Dow Finsterwald finished third at 197, eight strokes out of second place. The total purse was $400,000.

On the third Monday of May sixty-three players played two rounds at the Colonial Country Club in local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Central Pennsylvania. The first of the seven open spots went to the professional at the Sunset Country Club, Tom Robertson, who posted a 70 and a 69 for a three under par 139. Next was Danny O’Neill, who represented the Nittany Country Club while playing various professional tours, with a 144. A golf professional and sales representative for Ping named Gerald Waitulavich finished third at 146. Gettysburg Country Club professional Dave Stegeman tied for fourth with Bob Raymond at 147. The last two places went to Pete Malphrus and amateur Warren Choate who posted 149s and had to win a sudden death playoff to survive.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in the Philadelphia area was held at the Philadelphia Country Club and the Gulph Mills Golf Club on the third Tuesday of May. Three professionals earned medalist honors as they posted one under par 141s. Par was 71 at both courses. Pete Oakley, the assistant at the Rehoboth Beach Country Club, put up a 72 in the morning and came back with a 69 in the afternoon to tie Ed Dougherty who was home from the PGA Tour. Dougherty turned in a 71 and a 70. The other player sharing the medalist honors with a 69 and a 72 was Seaford, Delaware’s Larry Jones a recent graduate of the University of Maryland who had just turned pro. Jones was going to be working at an assistant at the Seaford Golf & Country Club. Don Bies a touring pro from Seattle and University of Texas star Jim Spagnola were next with 142s. Also making the grade was Rick Osberg, the professional at the Garrison’s Lake Golf Club, who turned in a 144. Future Section member Charlie Bolling and another amateur Gordon Brewer picked up the seventh and eighth spots with 145s. Jimmy Booros, the professional at the Allentown Municipal Golf Club, Waynesborough Country Club professional Ted McKenzie and reinstated amateur Bucky Erhardt, who had been an assistant at Saucon Valley Country Club, posted 146s. They won their spots through a sudden death playoff that ended on the first hole. Eleven players earned the right to move on to the sectional qualifying rounds two weeks later. Amateur Jay Sigel was given a special exemption to play in the Open and didn’t have to compete in either the local or sectional qualifying rounds.

Pete Oakley and Jimmy Booros made it through sectional qualifying for the U.S. Open on Canoe Brook Country Club’s North and South courses on the first Tuesday of June. Due to rain the qualifying wasn’t totally completed until the next day. Booros (145) put together rounds of 70 and 74 to finish second and Oakley (145) qualified third with a 73 and a 72. The low qualifier was Larry Degenhart with a 140. Ten players made the grade at Canoe Brook and players with 149 totals had to play off for the last spots.

In the first week of June Gary Hardin who had been working at several clubs in the Section made it through qualifying for the PGA Tour. He qualified at Pinehurst Country Club’s #6 Course with rounds of 74, 75, 73 and 75 to tie for 17th. A score of 298 qualified as 27 pros earned their playing privileges. Clint Doyle, who had been an assistant to Willie Scholl at the Gulph Mills Golf Club in 1977, also qualified with a score of 298. The medalist was Jack Spradlin with a 288 total.

The U.S. Open was played at the Baltusrol Golf Club’ Lower Course in mid June. In the first round Jack Nicklaus posted a 63 that tied the Open record for the lowest round and never looked back. He was either tied for the lead or in the lead at the end of each day’s round. A second round 71 gave him a two-stroke lead and a 70 in the third left him tied for the lead with Japan’s Isao Aoki. Nicklaus and Aoki were paired together in the final round and neither one gave in. They both finished with birdies on the last two holes but Nicklaus was around in 68 versus a 70 for Aoki. Nicklaus (272) and Aki (274) both broke Lee Trevino’s tournament record of 275 and they each collected $50,000 from "Golf Magazine". The magazine had offered the money to anyone who broke either the tournament or one round U.S. Open record during the tournament. First prize was $55,000 from a purse of $341,710. Tom Watson, Keith Fergus and Lon Hinkle tied for third with 276s. Pete Oakley, Jimmy Booros and amateur Jay Sigel missed the cut.

The first annual U.S. Senior Open was scheduled for the Winged Foot Golf Club in late June. The tournament attracted 631 entries. Qualifying in the Philadelphia area was held at the Manufacturers Golf & Country Club on the Monday after the U.S. Open. Bob Hendricks, the professional at the Avalon Golf Club and Al Besselink, who was playing the Senior PGA Tour, along with Arizona’s Bill Johnston tied for medalist honors with 75s. Skee Riegel, the pro emeritus at the Hidden Springs Golf & Country Club, and Arkansas pro Dick Metz also qualified with 78s. An amateur Hubert Selz picked up the last spot by posting a 79. A field of 25 pros and amateurs competed for six spots in the starting field at Winged Foot. Art Wall was exempt as a past winner of the Masters Tournament.


Leo Fraser
Atlantic City CC Owner
PGA of America President-1969-70

The new PGA Senior Tour opened for business in the third week of June at Leo Frasers’ Atlantic City Country Club. The tournament called the Atlantic City Senior International attracted a field of 63 pros and amateurs who were required to be at least 50 years old for eligibility. The tournament purse was $125,000, which was exactly what the prize money had been for the first Whitemarsh Open in 1963. Fourteen of the professionals who were entered had won at least one major professional title and there were eight professionals from the Philadelphia Section in the field. Art Wall was the low pro in a preliminary pro-am with a 65 and Mike Fetchik won a driving contest with a drive of 265 yards. On a windy first day Berwick’s Mike Souchak, who was playing the Senior PGA Tour, and Don January led with three under par 68s. In round two Souchak posted another sub-par round of 69 to take a two-stroke lead over January (68-71) into the final round. On Sunday January (208) birdied the first two holes and went on to post a 69 and win his first of what would be many senior titles. January toured the course in 69 strokes while Souchak (210) was falling back to second place with a 73. Bill Johnston put together a last round 66 to move into third place at 212 one stroke in front of Wall (213) and two strokes ahead of Bob Goalby (214), who finished fifth. In the last round Charlie Sifford jumped over 24 players when he scorched the Atlantic City course with a 63 to finish tied with Jack Fleck for sixth at 215. Sifford’s 63 broke the course record of 64 that had been set by Ed Oliver when he won the 1938 South Jersey Open. Freeway Golf Club professional Bill Bishop (216) finished with a 68 and tied for eighth with Julius Boros (216). First prize was $20,000. Wall picked up a check for $5,700 and Bishop won $3,200. Stan Dudas (222), operator of the Mays Landing Country Club and Al Besselink (222) tied for 22nd and they each won $1,600. Henry Williams, Jr. (231), the professional at the Moselem Springs Golf Club, and Charley Lepre (231), who was leasing the Pitman Golf Club, tied for 46th. They each won $1,120. Harvey Smith (244), the professional at the Greate Bay Country Club, finished 55th and won $1,050. Skee Riegel (159) had to withdraw with an injury but he still received the $1,000 last place money. The contestants all agreed to a man that the golf course was in perfect condition. They were amazed that there wasn’t a single complaint. This was just one of two events held in the inaugural year of the senior tour plus the PGA Senior Championship and the USGA Senior Open. In 1957 and 1958 Fraser had hosted his own senior opens at Atlantic City CC before anyone even dreamed of a senior tour. The entry fee was $50 plus another $25 for those who were not dues paying members of the Senior PGA Tour. A spectator pass for the week with clubhouse privileges, cost $30 and grounds only was $20.

The senior professionals felt like they were back on the tour. The ones who were eligible just took the short drive to New York for the inaugural U.S. Senior Open at the Winged Foot Golf Club that began four days after the Atlantic City Senior International. The tournament was played on Winged Foot’s East Course, which was set up at 6,619 yards and lived up to its reputation for difficulty. For this tournament the players had to be age 55 or older. The USGA used the age of 55 for eligibility because that was the age used for all its senior amateur tournaments. Twenty-seven of the 150 pros and amateurs in the starting field had received exemptions as former winners of one of the four major professional championships. The rest of the field had qualified at various locations around the country. There were 631 entries. Roberto De Vicenzo, who had won more than 240 tournaments around the world, captured the first U.S. Senior Open title. He started slowly with a 74 and a 73 but a third round three under par 68 gave him a two-stroke lead over Art Wall entering the final round. De Vicenzo put together another solid round of 70 for 285 and a four-stroke win, which included three-putt bogeys on the last two holes. Amateur Bill Campbell (289) shot a 69 in the last round to move into second place. Wall turned in a 73 for a 290 total and ended up alone in third place. Charlie Sifford (295) finished five strokes farther back in fourth place. Al Besselink (304) made the cut and tied for 21st winning $1,350. First prize was $20,000 and Wall took home $10,000 from the $100,000 purse. Bob Hendricks and Skee Riegel missed the cut.

Qualifying for the Philadelphia Open was held during the Lavino Shipping Open, which was won by the assistant from the Lancaster Country Club, Brett Upper, in a playoff with Pete Oakley. They had ended up tied at 72. The tournament was held at the Sunnybrook Golf Club on the last Monday of June. There were 161 entries and 44 professionals qualified. Only the defending champion, Jack Connelly, who was the professional at the Huntingdon Valley Country Club, was exempt. Atlantic City Country Club assistant Duke Delcher and Sherm Keeney, the professional at the Cool Creek Country Club, tied for third with 73s.

The Junior Golf Academy was held at the Downingtown Inn & Country Club again. Host professional George McNamara and Section executive director Jack Klein directed the school. More than 50 junior golfers attended the three-day session. The last day they were treated to a two-hour clinic by Ben Crenshaw, who arrived one hour early and then stayed around for another 90 minutes to talk to the boys and girls. Ted McKenzie gave a lecture on the rules of golf. At the end of the school McNamara showed pictures of the students on the practice tee and the golf course. Twelve of the Section’s professionals, which included two of the Section’s best players Pete Oakley and Dick Smith, Sr., a partner in the Wedgwood Country Club, assisted with the school.

The 18th and last IVB Golf Classic was played at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club. Qualifying for 31 openings in the tournament was held on the last Monday of July. Canadian Dave Barr led with a 65 and Clint Doyle, was next at 67. Tom Hanna, the professional at the Centre Hills Country Club, qualified with a 72. Hanna got in through a nineteen-man playoff for the last twelve spots. The entry fee was $100. The tournament concluded on the first Sunday of August with Doug Tewell at the top of leader board. Tewell went from almost missing the cut to winning. He began with a 67 and then slipped to a 73 that was saved by two late birdies. He then proceeded to shot a 65 and a 67 for 272, one stroke ahead of Tom Kite (273). Lou Graham, Calvin Peete, Ben Crenshaw and Fuzzy Zoeller tied for third with 274s. The only player from Philadelphia to make the cut was amateur and future Section member Jay Sigel (290). First prize from the $250,000 purse was $45,000. The host professional was Sam Penecale. Ted McKenzie, Jack Connelly, Gary Hardin, Greg Farrow, the assistant at the Pitman Golf Club, Ed Dougherty, Dave Collingwood, the professional at the Monroe Valley Country Club, Mike Swisher, the professional at the Lebanon Country Club, Bruce MacDonald, the Philadelphia Cricket Club’s professional, Hanna and Willie Scholl all missed the cut. The tournament was not well attended, as many of the big names were absent. The tournament had always been plagued by poor dates. Most of the years the tournament was the week before the U.S. Open, the British Open or the PGA Championship, and this year it was the PGA. PGA Tour events had become a huge undertaking to host. It now required 1,000 volunteers, who all paid for their own uniforms, to manage the tournament. After 18 years the novelty of hosting a tour event had worn off and only three of the 80 lady scorers were members at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club.

Two days after the IVB ended on the first Tuesday of August the Philadelphia Open was played at the Aronimink Golf Club. There were 45 professionals and 15 amateurs in the starting field. They had all qualified at an earlier date for the tournament. Jay Sigel, an Aronimink member, picked up his fourth Philly Open title. In the morning he was around in two under par 68 and he came back in the afternoon with a 72 to finish at 140 and win by four strokes. Ted McKenzie (144) posted a 73and a 71 to finish second. It was the second time that McKenzie had been runner-up to Sigel in the tournament and he had won the tournament at Aronimink in 1971. After holding the lead with a morning 67 Dick Smith, Sr. started the afternoon round with a triple bogey on the first hole. He finished with a 145 that tied Dick Hendrickson (145), the professional at the Loch Nairn Golf Club, and Mark Curlett (145), an assistant at the Aronimink Golf Club, for third place. The purse was $4,725 and McKenzie took home $1,250. The entry fee was $35.

On the second Sunday of August Jack Nicklaus made history by winning the PGA Championship for the fifth time. The five wins tied Walter Hagen for the most PGA Championship victories and Nicklaus did it in Hagen’s hometown. The Oak Hill Country Club in Rochester, New York hosted the tournament. Nicklaus’ rounds were 70, 69, 66 and 69 for 274. His margin of victory was the largest since the tournament had been changed to stroke play in 1958. Andy Bean finished second seven strokes back at 281. Lon Hinkle and Gil Morgan tied for third with 283s. First prize was $60,000 and the purse was $376,400. There were no current Philadelphia Section pros in the tournament.

Tim DeBaufre won the first of what would be many Delaware Valley Opens on the third Tuesday of August at the Hi-Point Golf Club. The hard work and promotional efforts of Hi-Point’s head pro Tom Smith had brought the tournament to fruition. Dick Hendrickson led after the first round on Monday with a five under par 67. At the end of nine holes on Tuesday Hendrickson was nine under par. He appeared to have the tournament won but DeBaufre put together a 66 to go with his first round 71 for a 137 total. That tied him with Hendrickson who lost two strokes to par on the last nine. A sudden-death playoff was held at the conclusion of play and DeBaufre won with a par on the second extra hole, which was hole #11. Dick Smith, Sr. finished third at 137 three strokes in front of Ted McKenzie and Jack Connelly who tied for fourth at 140. DeBaufre took home $2,000 and Hendrickson won $1,200 from the $10,300 purse. History was made at the tournament. Carly Brooks, an assistant from the Wilmington Country Club, became the first female from the Philadelphia Section to play in one of the Section’s events. She played from the same tees that the male pros used. In 1937 Babe Zaharias had played at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club in the True Temper Open, which was sponsored by the Philadelphia Section, but she was not affiliated with the PGA.


Bob Huber
Won 1980 Pennsylvania Open

The Pennsylvania Open was held in Pittsburgh at the Fox Chapel Golf Club in the fourth week of August. Bob Huber, in his first year as the professional at the Indian Valley Country Club, began with a one under par 70 on Monday, which gave him a tie for the lead. Huber (143) came back the next day with a 73 to bring the title back to Eastern Pennsylvania. Pittsburgh’s John Rech finished second at 144. Huber made a bogey on the par three 17th hole to fall into a tie with Rech but on the par four 18th hole he made a seven-foot putt for a birdie to win by one stroke. Tied for third were Mark Curlett, Oakmont Country Club professional Bob Ford and amateur Frank Fuhrer III with 145s. Huber took home a check for $2,160 from a record purse of $12,000. Huber had previous finishes of second and third in the tournament.

Qualifying for the PGA Club Professional Championship was held at the Manufacturers Golf & Country Club on the last Friday of August. Ted McKenzie and Tom Robertson led eight qualifiers with 36-hole scores of 142 one stroke ahead of Trenton Country Club professional Dennis Milne (143). Also qualifying were Bruce MacDonald, Bob Hendricks and Roger Stern, the professional at the Northampton Country Club, who each turned in 145s. Bob Hibschman who was now the head professional at the Manufacturers Golf & Country Club and Don DeAngelis, who was now the head professional at the Plymouth Country Club, picked up the last two spots with 146s. Little Mill Country Club professional Ken Peyre-Ferry got in as an alternate when Ed Dougherty won the Section Championship. Dougherty wasn’t eligible for the Club Professional Championship because he had played in more than twelve tournaments on the PGA Tour in the past twelve months.

The sixth annual Westlake Plastics Invitation tournament was played at the Whitford Country Club in early September. Westlake Plastics sponsored the $29,000 tournament. Bob Hibschman (143) took home the title with rounds of 71 on Sunday and 72 on Monday. Ted McKenzie and Willie Scholl tied for second with even par 144s. Pete Oakley, Jim Mathias, an assistant at the Concord Country Club and Rydal Country Club professional John Lubin tied for fourth at 146.

In September Sam Penecale qualified for the PGA Senior’s Championship, which was being played in Florida in December. Art Wall, Mike Souchak and Al Besselink were exempt. Wall and Souchak were in as former members of the Ryder Cup Team. Besselink was exempt for having finished in the top 15 in the 1979 PGA Seniors’ Championship and also for having won more than once on the PGA Tour during his career. Sectional qualifying was held in the 40 PGA Sections for another 250+ entries who were competing for the other 79 places in the championship.


Ed Dougherty
1980 Section Champion

Waynesborough Country Club and Ted McKenzie hosted the Section Championship in the fourth week of September. McKenzie was also the defending champion. The tournament was back in Paoli about two miles from where the first Section Championship had been played 58 years before at the Tredyffrin Country Club. The recently remodeled George Fazio design golf course had been shortened but it still measured 6,764 yards. The nines had been reversed so that the last hole finished right in front of the clubhouse. The first round ended with Ed Dougherty and Jack Connelly at the top of the leader board with four under par 67s and after the second round they were still tied at the top after posting 73s. With one round to go there were eleven players within six strokes of the lead. In the last round Dougherty (210) put together a 70 that edged out Pete Oakley (211) by one shot and Connelly (212) by two. Connelly double bogeyed the last hole when he drove into some trees and his ball lodged in tree roots. Oakley might have tied for first except for a one-stroke penalty he incurred in the first round when he accidentally dropped his putter on his ball at the fourth green of the first round. Ken Peyre-Ferry finished fourth at 215, two strokes in front of Tom Robertson (217) and Dave Collingwood (217). Dougherty took home a check for $4,000 from the $21,650 purse and had his name engraved on the Bulletin Cup. Oakley picked up $2,800 and Connelly won $2,000. The entry fee was $55.

Jimmy Booros qualified for the PGA Tour in the third week of October at the Fort Washington Golf & Country Club in Fresno, California. His first three rounds were a pedestrian 74, 73 and 71, which left him on the cusp to earn a playing card. In the final round he turned in a six-under-par 65 to vault himself all the way up to a tie for fifth. The 65 was the low score in the final round by two strokes and tied the low round of the week. Booros’s finish also earned him a check for $900. Booros had participated in the qualifying school eight times and it was his second successful trip having passed the test in the fall of 1976 also. Bruce Douglas was the medalist by seven strokes at 271. Mark O’Meara made it there and Fred Couples earned his playing privilege with a tie for one of the final spots. Twenty-seven players earned their cards there.

The PGA Club Professional Championship was hosted by the new PGA National Golf Club in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida during the last week of October. Only one of the PGA’s courses was ready for play so two of the three courses used for the tournament, Frenchman’s Creek North Course and Eastpointe Country Club, were not a part of PGA National. The PGA National’s Haig Course was used for one of the contestants’ first three rounds and the final round. Michigan’s John Traub took home the $20,000 first prize by two strokes over Jim Albus (285). Traub posted rounds of 72, 69, 73 and 69 for 283. Traub was the only player in the field that broke 70 in the final round. Gene Borek, Larry Gilbert and Don Padgett II tied for third with 287s. Four of the nine Philadelphia Section members made the cut. Bruce MacDonald finished tied for 31st at 295 and won $937.50. By finishing in the top 35 MacDonald qualified for the 1981 PGA Championship. Ted McKenzie (297) tied for 43rd and won $612.50. Tom Robertson (299) tied for 65th and Dennis Milne (301) tied for 80th. They each won $231.61. There were 336 players in the starting field and the purse was again $125,000. Ken Peyre-Ferry, Bob Hendricks, Roger Stern, Bob Hibschman and Don DeAngelis missed the cut.

The Philadelphia Section pros defeated the pros from the Middle Atlantic Section on the last Friday of October at the Downingtown Inn & Country Club. Several of the players on both teams were just back from Florida and the PGA Club Professional Championship, which had ended five days before. It was the 12th time the two PGA Sections had contested the Challenge Cup Match. The match was held on one day with each team playing twelve singles matches and six four-ball matches at the same time. Each four man pairing was competing for nine points. In the singles matches Tom Robertson and Bobby Huber each won the maximum of 3 points. Mark Curlett and Sam Penecale won 2½ points each; Tim DeBaufre, Don DeAngelis and Sherm Keeney won 2 points apiece; Bill Bishop won 1½ points and Bala Golf Club professional Henry McQuiston won 1 point. John Carson, the professional at the Cedarbrook Hill, and Ted McKenzie each won ½ point. In the four-ball matches the teams of Robertson-Carson and Bishop-Penecale each won 2½ points. Huber-Keeney and DeAngelis-McQuiston won 2 points apiece and McKenzie-DeBaufre won 1 point. Huber-Kenney, the last pairing on the golf course, finished with 7 points to clinch the win. This gave the Philadelphia Section 30½ points to 23½ for the Middle Atlantic pros. Tom Lynch, the professional at the Linwood Country Club, was also a member of the team. Robertson overcame a two-down position after four holes to win by 5&3. He holed out a four-iron for an eagle two on the sixth hole and finished with a 69 which was the low round of the day for Philadelphia. His fellow team members voted him the Marty Lyons Award as the team’s most valuable member. The win gave the Philadelphia Section eight wins in the twelve-year history of the matches.

In late October the PGA of America’s national meeting was held at The Breakers hotel in Palm Beach, Florida. Joe Black and Mark Kizziar moved up to president and secretary. Indiana’s Mickey Powell ran against Pat Reilly and Jim Applegate for treasurer and won on the first ballot. The association’s fiscal year was changed by ending the year on the last day June instead of the last day of August. One reason the fiscal year was changed was to enable the staff to have the year’s complete financial figures available for the annual meeting. The Section’s delegates to the meeting were Tim DeBaufre and Dick Smith, Sr. There were 40 PGA Sections.


Dick Smith, Sr.
"Golf Professional of the Year"
1980

The Philadelphia Section’s fall meeting and election of officers was held at the Downingtown Inn & Golf Club on the first Monday of November. Dick Smith, Sr. stepped down from office after three years as president. Tim DeBaufre was elected president, moving up from first vice president and Tom Smith was elected first vice president. Tim Foran, the professional at the Torresdale-Frankford Country Club and Jack Connelly were reelected second vice president and secretary. The professional at the Radnor Valley Country Club, Bill Johnstone, was elected treasurer to replace Tom Wilcox who was leaving the Philadelphia Country Club for a job in Chicago. Tom Smith and Ron Rolfe, the professional at the North Hills Country Club, were appointed co-tournament chairmen. Dick Smith, Sr. was honored as the "Golf Professional of the Year" for the work he had done promoting the tournament schedule. He had been on the tournament committee for many years and he was the chairman of the committee for the three years before he was elected president. Pete Oakley was the "Player of the Year" and he won the DeBaufre Trophy with a scoring average of 71.40 strokes per round. As the past president and honorary president Dick Smith, Sr. announced that he was going to revive the Booster Pro-Am Program that had been originated by the Philmont Country Club professional Buzz Garvin when he was president. Spots in the pro-am would cost $300 and the tournament sponsors would be compted guests of the Section. The Section’s professionals who were the top money winners would all be playing in the event. In the face of an $8,000 deficit in the treasury something was needed to keep the Section solvent. After the meeting a golf show was held from noon to 6:00 PM and it was open to the public.

The PGA Seniors’ Championship was played at the Turnberry Isle Country Club’s South Course in the first week of December. The course measured 6,800 yards and the purse had been increased by $25,000 to $125,000. There were 127 starters of which 48 were exempt. Arnold Palmer made his debut in the PGA Seniors’ Championship with an extra hole win over Paul Harney. They had tied with one over par 289s. Palmer won on the first extra hole (#15) with a birdie 3 from out of a group of trees. Palmer, who had not been able to win a PGA Championship, said, "It’s the PGA Championship I never won". There were only four rounds shot in the 60s during the tournament. Palmer’s rounds were 72, 69, 73 and 75. Don January (290), the defending champion who had won the Seniors’ Championship the previous year at Turnberry Isle with an 18 under par score, finished third one stroke out of first place. Art Wall ended up in a seven-way tie for fourth at 291 with Charlie Sifford, Julius Boros, Bob Goalby, Walker Inman, Fred Wampler and Bob Erickson. They each won $5,128.57. First prize was $20,000. Mike Souchak (299) tied for 30th winning $725 and Sam Penecale (303), the Section’s only nonexempt entry won $460 as he tied for 43rd. Al Besselink had been exempt from qualifying off his top 15 finish in the tournament the year before and as a career multiple winner on the PGA Tour, but he didn’t enter the tournament. Wall and Souchak were exempt as former Ryder Cup team members.

The PGA "Player of the Year" was Tom Watson and he was the leading money winner with $530,808.33. Lee Trevino won the Vardon Trophy with a stroke average of 69.73 strokes per round. Ed Dougherty had his worst year on the PGA Tour as he fell all the way to 171st on the money list, winning just $9,113 in 25 events. Gary Hardin won $981 in twelve tournaments and Jeff Steinberg won $444 in seven tournaments. Art Wall played in five events and won $1,500.

The PGA Senior Tour was in its first season and there were just four events. Art Wall played in three of them and won $20,829 to finish third on the money list. He also won $1,500 on the PGA Tour in five tournaments. Mike Souchak won $14,125 in three tournaments on the PGA Senior Tour and Al Besselink won $4,010 in three events.

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1981 - The Philadelphia Section’s spring meeting was on the first Monday of April at the Green Valley Country Club. Junior Golf chairman John Lubin, announced plans for the Junior Golf Academy and an expansion of the Junior Tour from four to six events. First Vice President Tom Smith and his co-tournament chairman Ron Rolfe presented a tournament schedule of 42 events with added monies of $160,000 and total purses exceeding $250,000. The TPD fee, which had been created to ensure that the tournament players were paying the costs of the tournament operations, was $65. Executive Director Jack Klein informed the Section members that the Yamaha Golf Cart Company had signed on to sponsor the Section’s points race and the challenge match against the Middle Atlantic PGA for three years.

In the first full week of April Tom Watson won the Masters Tournament for a second time with rounds of 71, 68, 70 and 71 for an eight under par 280. Johnny Miller and Jack Nicklaus tied for second with 282s and finished one shot in front of Greg Norman (283). It was the first Masters played on bentgrass greens. Jay Sigel put together a 294 to earn low amateur honors for a second straight year. Art Wall missed the cut and picked up the $1,500 check that all of the professional competitors received as a minimum. First prize was $60,000.

Jeff Steinberg, who was back in the Section as the teaching pro at Gasser’s Driving Range, and California’s Mac O’Grady tied for medalist honors in the local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Central Pennsylvania. They earned two of the eight open spots at the Carlisle Country Club on the third Monday of May with one over par 141s. The course was shortened slightly and par was reduced from 71 to 70. Steinberg and O’Grady both posted identical rounds of 71 and 70. The rest of the places went to six players who all tied at 146. They were Tom Hanna, Tom Robertson, Brookside Country Club assistant Wayne Phillips, Gage Bolton, assistant at the Blue Ridge Country Club, Jim Masserio, the new professional at the Toftrees Resort & Golf Club and an amateur Rick Brenner.

Local qualifying in Philadelphia for the U.S. Open was held at the Philadelphia Country Club and St. Davids Golf Club on the third Tuesday of May. There were 147 pros and amateurs vying for 16 spots in the sectional qualifying round. Jimmy Booros came home from the PGA Tour to grab the medalist honors. After being four over par standing on the eighth tee at St. Davids Booros managed to turn in a one over par 72 and then he came back with a one under par 70 at PCC to finish at even par 142 for the day. Gene Fieger, assistant at The Springhaven Club, and amateur Jim Robertson tied for second at 143. Ted McKenzie and Douglas Campbell, a professional from the state of Washington, tied for fourth with 144s. Philadelphia Cricket Club professional Bruce MacDonald plus amateurs Buddy Marucci, Chip Lutz and Scott Tharrington passed the test with 145s. Tim DeBaufre who was now the professional at the Philadelphia Country Club and amateur Charlie Bolling were next with 146s. Six players with scores of 148 played off for the last four spots. The survivors of the playoff that lasted only two holes were Ed Dougherty, Pete Oakley, Ken Peyre-Ferry and Cobbs Creek Golf Club assistant Frank Palumbo. It took 13 hours to complete the qualifying and playoff.

Jim Masserio led the sectional qualifying for the U.S. Open at the Sharon Golf Club near Cleveland on the second Tuesday of June. Masserio (70-70) and Chi Chi Rodriguez (73-67) tied for the medal with 140s. There were nine spots at Sharon and a score of 146 qualified.

Merion Golf Club hosted the U.S. Open for a fourth time in the third week of June. The USGA received a record 4,946 entries and the purse was a record also, $346,730. Entering the final round Australia’s David Graham trailed George Burns by three strokes but a near flawless three under par 67 on Sunday brought Graham home three strokes in front. Graham posted rounds of 68, 68, 70 and 67 for a 273, which missed the Open record by one stroke. In the final round Graham only missed one fairway and three greens. On the three holes where he wasn’t on the green in regulation his ball was on the collar where he was able to use his putter. Burns and Bill Rogers tied for second with 276s. John Cook and John Schroeder tied for fourth at 279. First prize from the $347,330 purse was $55,000. Graham was the 20th foreign-born player to win our Open. The Philadelphia Section’s only entry Jim Masserio missed the cut. The host professional was Bill Kittleman who had another successful week selling merchandise from tents located at key sites on the golf course. The merchandise was embossed or embroidered with 1981 U.S. Open and Merion Golf Club.

Qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open was at the Coatesville Country Club on the last Monday of June. Amateur Larry Feldman qualified with a 75 and Stan Dudas won the second and last place with a 76. Art Wall and Mike Souchak were exempt as former Ryder Cup Team members. Al Besselink was exempt for having finished 21st in the U.S. Senior Open the year before.

The second U.S. Senior Open was played near Detroit at the Oakland Hills Country Club in the second week of July. The eligibility age was reduced from 55 to 50 and many thought that this was done for the benefit of Arnold Palmer who was 51 years old. Whatever, it worked for Palmer as he put together rounds of 72, 76, 68 and 73 to get a tie with Billy Casper and Bob Stone at 289. Art Wall was tied for the lead going into the final round and he still had a tie for the lead after 14 holes with Palmer, Casper and Stone. Wall missed the playoff by one stroke as he bogeyed the last three holes while the other three were each making two bogeys in their last four holes. Walls’ rounds of 71, 72, 73 and 74 left him alone in fourth place at 290. He picked up a check for $6,736. The next day Palmer shot a steady round of par, 70, to beat Stone (74) by four strokes and Casper (77) by seven. At one point in the playoff Stone led by six strokes and as late as the 13th hole he still had the lead. First prize was $26,000. Mike Souchak tied for 8th at 296 and won $4,036. Stan Dudas tied for 22nd and won $1,436 for his 302 total. Al Besselink missed the cut. The purse had been increased to $149,102.

Nine Section members qualified for the PGA Club Professional Championship on the fourth Friday of July. Qualifying was held at the Green Valley Country Club. The nine qualifiers were John Carson, Stan Dudas, Dick Hendrickson, Bob Hibschman, Bob Huber, Pete Oakley, Tom Robertson, Steve Snyder, the professional at the Berkleigh Country Club and Jeff Steinberg who was back in the Section as the teaching pro at Gasser’s Driving Range. Dick Smith, Sr. qualified also when he won the Section Championship in early October.

In late July the three-day Junior Golf Academy was held again at the Ramada Downingtown Inn. Eighty boys and girls attended. One of the highlights of the academy was a guest appearance of Larry Bowa, shortstop of the World Champion Philadelphia Phillies. The school was hosted by the head professional George McNamara.

Dick Hendrickson overcame rain and flooded greens to win the Philadelphia Open for a third time. The tournament was hosted by the par 72 Whitford Country Club on the first Monday of August. Hendrickson (140) put together a morning 71 and an afternoon 69 to finish two strokes in front of Honey Run Golf Club professional Don Stough (142) and Rick Osberg (142). Dennis Milne finished fourth at 143 and Pete Oakley tied amateur Jay Sigel for fifth place at 144. Sigel was the defending champion and he was trying to win the tournament for a seventh time. During the heaviest rain Osberg posted the low round, a 68 in the afternoon. Hendrickson picked up a check for $1,300 from the $6,050 purse. Osberg and Stough each won $775. The entry fee was $43.

The PGA Championship was played at the Atlanta Athletic Club near Atlanta, Georgia. The tournament ended on the second Sunday in August. It was Larry Nelson’s week as he put together rounds of 70, 66, 66 and 71 for a 273 and a four-stroke win. Fuzzy Zoeller finished second at 277 one stroke in front of Dan Pohl (278) and two strokes ahead of seven other players who tied at 279. They were; Jack Nicklaus, Tom Kite, Greg Norman, Bob Gilder, Keith Fergus, Bruce Lietzke and Isao Aoki. First prize from a purse of $401,600 was $60,000. Bruce MacDonald missed the cut. He had qualified by finishing in the top 35 at the 1980 Club Professional Championship.

Duke Delcher won the Delaware Valley Open at the Hi-Point Golf Club. The tournament was played on the second Monday and Tuesday of August. Delcher led after Monday’s round with a four under par 68 but when all the scores were posted from Tuesday’s round he was in a five-way tie at the top of the leaderboard. A second round 72 had left Delcher tied at 140 with Dick Smith, Sr., now the professional at the Woodcrest Country Club, Tom Robertson, Dick Hendrickson and Gary Hardin who was now an assistant at the Plymouth Country Club. There was a sudden-death playoff that lasted only one hole as Delcher holed a fifteen-foot putt for a birdie three to wrap up the win. Delcher earned $1,200 from the $8,900 purse.

Bob Ford returned home in the last week of August to win the Pennsylvania Open at the Aronimink Golf Club. Ford had been the junior champion at Aronimink ten years before. Ford (136) led all the way with a par 70 on Monday and a 66 the next day to win by seven strokes over Jack Connelly (143). Jim Masserio and Western Pennsylvania’s Sherm Hostetter tied for third with 146s. Gary Hardin tied for fifth at 147. First prize was $2,160 and the purse totaled $12,000. Connelly won $1,440.

Section qualifying for the PGA Seniors’ Championship was held at the Oak Terrace Country Club during the Section Senior Championship on the second Friday of September. The successful qualifiers were Bill Bishop who won the senior title with a 67 and Stan Dudas who finished second with a 74. Sam Penecale, Moselem Springs professional Henry Williams, Jr. and Jerry Pisano, who was leasing the Flourtown Country Club, tied for third. Art Wall and Mike Souchak had exemptions into the tournament as former Ryder Cup Team members. Al Besselink was exempt as a career multiple winner on the PGA Tour but he didn’t enter the tournament.

Gary Hardin won the $18,000 Westlake Plastics Invitation tournament at the Whitford Country Club on the second Monday of September. Hardin (139) posted a five under par 67 on Sunday and came back with a 72 on Monday to win the $2,500 first prize check. Pete Oakley (142) finished three strokes off the winning pace in second place. Next in third place came Tony Cella, the professional at the Fox Hill Country Club, with a 143 total. Four players tied for fourth with 145s.


Dick Smith, Sr.
1981 Section Champion

The 60th Philadelphia Section PGA Championship was played at the Cavaliers Country Club in early October. It was the first time that the Section Championship had been held in the state of Delaware. On Monday Ed Dougherty posted a five under par 66 after arriving home at 2:30 a.m. from the Texas Open where he had finished 28th. On the second day Rick Osberg took a one-stroke lead over Dougherty by tacking a 70 onto his opening round of 69. In the final round scoring was a problem and no one broke 70 due to high winds. Dick Smith, Sr. (216) put together a 74 to go with his earlier rounds of 72 and 70 and won the Section Championship for a third time. Dougherty had a chance to force a playoff but his downhill eight-foot putt slipped by the hole. Dougherty and Bruce MacDonald tied for second at 217. Smith picked up a check for $2,500 from the $12,000 purse. The entry fee was $58. Dougherty and MacDonald each won $1,250. Osberg and Jim Masserio tied for fourth with 219s one stroke ahead of Ted McKenzie (220). The host professional was Jeff Lindeke.

The Philadelphia Section and the Middle Atlantic Section met for the thirteenth time in a challenge match in the fourth week of October. The challenge cup matches had a new sponsor, the Yamaha Corporation-America, had agreed to a three-year contract. Each Section was represented by twelve of its members. The matches were played at the Congressional Country Club in Bethesda, Maryland. On the first day, a Thursday, the teams competed for six points in four-ball match play. Philadelphia was only able to win 1½ points as the team of Dick Smith, Sr.-Ted McKenzie won their match and the Gary Hardin-Don Stough team halved their match. The next day there were twelve points up for grabs as the teams played twelve singles matches. Philadelphia picked up 6½ points as Dick Hendrickson, Tom Robertson, Jack Connelly, Bill Bishop and Hardin won along with three halved matches by Rick Osberg, Smith and Stough. Several of the singles matches were either won or halved on the final hole by the Middle Atlantic pros to keep Philadelphia one point short of getting a tie. The final tally was 10 points for the Middle Atlantic against 9 for the Philadelphia pros. The other members of the Philadelphia team were Pete Oakley, Bruce MacDonald and Sam Penecale. The non-playing captain of the team was Ron Rolfe.

The national PGA meeting was held in Palm Beach, Florida at the Breakers Hotel in late October. The delegates from the Philadelphia Section were Jack Connelly and Bill Johnstone. After a great deal of discussion the delegates voted to increase the national dues by $25 to $100. The selling point was that the reserve fund had to be increased in order to insure against disasters. The delegates also voted to continue to pay airline coach travel expenses for the Club Professional Championship contestants. President Joe Black, Secretary Mark Kizziar and the Treasurer Mickey Powell were reelected without opposition.


DeBaufre Trophy
Dick Hendrickson (r) receiving trophy
Tom DeBaufre (l) presents for the family

Tim DeBaufre was reelected Section president at the Philadelphia Section’s fall meeting. The meeting was hosted by Downingtown Inn & Country Club on the first Tuesday of November. Jack Connelly moved from secretary to first vice president and John Poole, the professional at the Kennett Square Golf & Country Club, was elected second vice president. That meant that Poole, who had been serving on the club relations committee since its inception was replacing Tim Foran as the all-important chairman of the committee. Harry Hammond, the professional at the Whitford Country Club, was elected secretary and Bill Johnstone was reelected treasurer. The "Golf Professional of the Year" was Jay Weitzel, the longtime head professional at the Hershey Country Club. He was the Director of Golf overseeing five golf courses in Hershey for the Hershey Foods Corporation. Weitzel had hosted the Pennsylvania Open for ten years and the state junior championship for more than ten years. Dick Hendrickson was the Section’s "Player of the Year" for a second time and he won the DeBaufre Trophy for the fourth time with a stroke average of 71.20.


Jay Weitzel
"Golf Professional of the Year"
1981

The PGA Club Professional Championship was played at the PGA National Golf Club in the third week of November. All three of the PGA National’s courses were used for the tournament. The Champion Course, Haig Course and Squire Course were used for the first three rounds and the final round was played on the Champion Course. The tournament came down to a playoff with Kentucky’s Larry Gilbert prevailing over Ohio’s Don Padgett II with a par on the second extra hole. They had tied at three under par 285. Gilbert’s rounds were 67, 70, 74 and 74. First prize was $20,000. Richard Crawford finished third at 286 and Gary Robinson was next with a 288. Dick Hendrickson led the Philadelphia Section pros with a 294 that tied for 13th. Hendrickson won $2,400 as he finished one stroke ahead of Dick Smith, Sr. (295) who tied for 16th and won $1,900. Hendrickson and Smith for the 1982 PGA Championship and next year’s PGA Club Professional Championship. Tom Robertson (300) tied for 53rd and Jeff Steinberg (302) tied for 62nd. They each won the last money of $277.71. Steve Snyder, Bobby Huber, Bob Hibschman, John Carson, Pete Oakley and Stan Dudas missed the cut.

Miller Barber won what he called his first "major championship" by wrapping up the PGA Seniors’ Championship at the Turnberry Isle Country Club near Miami, Florida. The tournament was played in the first week of December on Turnberry Isle’s South Course. With rounds of 68, 72 and 68 he took the lead and finished with a 73 for a seven under par 281. Barber edged out Arnold Palmer (283) by two strokes. Art Wall posted rounds of 68, 75, 71 and 70 to tie Don January for third place at 284. First prize was $20,000 and Wall won $11,250. Stan Dudas (309) tied for 61st and won $222.73. Bill Bishop, Al Besselink and Mike Souchak must have missed the cut.

The PGA "Player of the Year" was Bill Rogers, the leading money winner was Tom Kite with $375,698.84 and Kite won the Vardon Trophy with a stroke average of 69.80 strokes per round. Jimmy Booros and Ed Dougherty each played in 22 tournaments on the PGA Tour. Booros won $28,708 to finish 115th and Dougherty finished 124th on earnings of $22,096. Gary Hardin won $1,409 in eight events.

Art Wall played in five of the seven events on the PGA Senior Tour and won $37,556, which was fifth best. Mike Souchak was 16th as he won $16,184 in six tournaments. Al Besselink played five events and won $6,555.

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1982 - On February 1st the Philadelphia Section moved from its one room office in Haverford to a new location, which was near the Edgmont Golf Club. The new address was 5014 West Chester Pike, Newtown Square, 19073. The new telephone number was 215-359-1910. The Newtown Square office offered more space for the secretaries, a separate boardroom for meetings and an office for the executive director. The Section now had 940 square feet of office space. The Section’s previous office, its first, had been at the Haverford location for 13 years.

The Philadelphia Section’s spring meeting was held on the first Monday of April at the Ramada Downingtown Inn. The Treasurer Bill Johnstone had left the Section for a new job in Chicago and Dave Schueck, the professional at the DuPont Country Club, had been appointed to fill the vacancy. Joe Moresco, the PGA of America’s vice-president representing District II, spoke on national affairs. The members of the Section voted to bar Section members who had played in more than 12 tournaments on the PGA Tour in the previous 12 months from the Section’s weekly tournaments. Major tournaments like the U.S. Open and the PGA Championship did not count as one of the 12 tournaments. Any of those who were barred from the weekly events could still play in all of the Section’s championships.

On the second Monday of April the Section members and apprentices were back at the Downingtown Inn for the spring education seminar. The speakers were Eb Steiniger the long time green superintendent at the Pine Valley Golf Club and John Spiroplaus the professional at the Olympia Fields Country Club. Steiniger spoke on agronomy and Spiroplaus instructed on the rules of golf and tournament management.

Craig Stadler picked up his only win in a major when he won the Masters Tournament on the second Sunday of April. With rounds of 75, 69, 67 and a front nine 33 Stadler took a six-stroke lead into the final nine but a 40 on the back nine gave Dan Pohl a chance to catch him. Pohl (284) had begun with two 75s but he came back with a pair of 67s on the weekend to force a sudden-death playoff. Stadler (284) made a par on the first playoff hole, #10, to win. First prize was $64,000. Seve Ballesteros and Jerry Pate just missed the playoff with 285 totals. Art Wall and amateur Jay Sigel missed the cut.

Local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Central Pennsylvania was held at the West Shore Country Club on the fourth Monday of May. There were 61 entries. Playing in a light mist all day amateur Jeff Foxx led the way with a 71 in the morning and an afternoon 75 for a two over par 146. Danny O’Neill finished second at 147. O’Neill had played in the U.S. Open twice in the 1970s. The third spot went to Jeff Rupert, an assistant at the Clinton Country Club with a 149. Tom Robertson and Jeff Steinberg tied for the fourth and last spot, which Robertson won with a birdie four on the second hole of sudden death.

Jimmy Booros came home from the PGA Tour to lead the local qualifying for the U.S. Open in the Philadelphia area on the fourth Tuesday of May. Booros turned in a two under par 69 at Gulph Mills Golf Club in his morning round and he came back with a three under par 68 at the Philadelphia Country Club in the afternoon. His 137 score led the field by four strokes. Pete Oakley, who was now the professional at the Shawnee Country Club in Delaware, was next with a 141. Dick Smith, Sr., Tim DeBaufre and Jim Bromley, an assistant at the Waynesborough Country Club, tied for third with 142s. Greg Farrow was alone in sixth place with a 143. Don DeAngelis, Ed Dougherty, Willie Scholl and Alan Shankin, the co-head professional at the Warrington Country Club, turned in 144s and tied for seventh. Dick Hendrickson, now the head professional at the Radley Run Country Club, turned in a 145 and won the last spot in a playoff. He defeated amateur and future Section member Chris Anderson with a birdie on the first extra hole. There were eleven spots open and the Philadelphia Section professionals won all of them.

The Pebble Beach Golf Links in California hosted the U.S. Open in the third week of June. Tom Watson and Bill Rogers teed off last on Sunday tied for the lead at 212. Watson arrived at the 17th tee tied for the lead with Jack Nicklaus who was in the clubhouse after posting a three under par 69 for a 72-hole total of 284. When Watson missed the 71st green with a two-iron shot Nicklaus thought he had a good chance at a playoff. Watson proceeded to chip in from the rough just off the left side of the green for a birdie and he birdied the next hole also even though he played conservatively. Watson won by two strokes with rounds of 72, 72, 68 and 70 for 282. As a student at Stanford University Watson had played many rounds at Pebble Beach and he always had dreamed of winning the U.S. Open there. Rogers, Bobby Clampett and Dan Pohl tied for third at 286. First prize was $60,000 from a purse of $369,422. There were no professionals from the Philadelphia Section in the U.S. Open that year.

Stan Dudas and Al Besselink qualified for the U.S. Senior Open at Bidermann Golf Club on the last Tuesday of June. Dudas won the medal with a one over par 73 and Besselink posted a 76. There were two spots for the qualifiers to compete for. Art Wall and Mike Souchak were exempt off their finish in the Senior Open the previous year.

The Portland Golf Club hosted the U.S. Senior Open in the second week of July. Miller Barber showed that he was going to be a force in senior professional golf by shooting a last round six under par 65 to win by four strokes. The 65 was the lowest round of the tournament by three strokes. Barber (72-74-71-65) finished at two under par 282 and won $28,648. Gene Littler (286) and Dan Sikes (286) tied for second and each won $12,519.50. Bob Goalby ended up alone in fourth place at 289. Art Wall (297) put together another strong showing in the tournament by finishing 12th with rounds of 75, 74, 74 and 74. He won $2,608. Stan Dudas, Al Besselink and Mike Souchak missed the cut.

On the first Tuesday of August Harold Perry won the Philadelphia Open on the Wilmington Country Club’s South Course. Perry, a new member of the Section and an assistant at the Tall Pines Country Club had recently won the Doylestown and Subaru Opens back to back. He posted rounds of 74 and 72 for a two over par 146 on a course he described as playing like a U.S. Open setup. Perry finished three strokes in front of Tom Robertson, Rick Osberg and Pete Oakley who posted 149s. First prize from the $6,840 purse was $1,400.

Ray Floyd won a second PGA Championship in early August at the Southern Hills Country Club in Tulsa, Oklahoma. A seven under par 63 in the first round gave him a three-stroke lead and he never looked back. He tacked on rounds of 69, 68 and 72 for 272 and won by three strokes. Lanny Watkins (275) finished second. First prize was $85,000 from a total payout of $451,800. Fred Couples and Calvin Peete tied for third with 276s. Jimmy Booros, Dick Hendrickson and Dick Smith, Sr. missed the cut. Booros was in the tournament off his standing on the PGA Tour. Hendrickson and Smith had made the field off their finishes in the 1981 PGA Club Professional Championship.

On the second Tuesday of August Jack Connelly won the two-day Delaware Valley Open at the Hi-Point Golf Club. Connelly earned the victory by defeating Pete Oakley with a birdie on the second hole of sudden death. Connelly (139) posted a 72 and a 67 to catch Oakley who had rounds of 71 and a 68. Tom Robertson missed the playoff by one stroke at 140. Harold Perry, Duke Delcher, Dick Smith, Sr. and Larry Demers, the assistant at the Whitemarsh Valley Country Club, tied for fourth with 141s. First prize was $1,400.

The Pennsylvania Open was played in late August at the St. Clair Country Club near Pittsburgh. Most of the prizes went to the western Pennsylvania residents. Lee Raymond, a former professional who nearly won the 1960 Ponce de Leon Open on the PGA Tour, got the win. Raymond and another former touring pro Jim Ferree ended up tied at the end of the two-day tournament with identical rounds of 73-73 for two over par 146s. Raymond won on the first hole of sudden death with a three-putt bogey when Ferree four-putted. Jim Masserio finished one stroke out of the playoff with a 147 and Bob Meyer of Greenville was next at 148.

Stan Dudas qualified for the PGA Seniors’ Championship by winning the Philadelphia Section Senior Championship. Bob Hendricks also qualified there. The tournament was played at the Oak Terrace Country Club on the third Monday of August. Dudas won with a one under par 70. Art Wall, Al Besselink and Mike Souchak were exempt as former multiple winners on the PGA Tour.

Jim Bromley won the Westlake Plastics Invitation tournament at the Whitford Country Club in the second week of September. Bromley and Don DeAngelis were tied for the lead after Sunday’s round with 67s and Bromley won it on Monday with a 74 for 141. DeAngelis ended up tied for second with Tom Robertson at 143. No one in the field broke 71 on Monday. Dave Collingwood, who was now the professional at the Hawk Valley Golf Club, finished fourth at 144.


Dick Smith, Sr.
1982 Section Champion

In the third week of September Dick Smith, Sr. won the Section Championship by defending his title at the Huntingdon Valley Country Club. The other two who had won two straight were George B. Smith in 1929 and 1930 and Art Wall in 1962 and 1963. This was Smith’s fourth Section Championship title. Heavy rain interrupted the afternoon players during the first round and at the end of the day Bob Hibschman held the lead with a 70. Smith posted a 74, which left him in a five-way tie for sixth. On the second day Smith produced a 67 for the low round of the day by four strokes. The 67 vaulted him into the lead by three strokes over Hibschman and the host professional Jack Connelly who had put together a pair of 72s. In the rainy final round Smith (212) shot a steady 71 to win by five strokes over Connelly (217). Hibschman tied for third with Don Stough at 218 one stroke in front of Don DeAngelis (219) and Bruce MacDonald (219). Smith won $3,500 from the $19,300 purse and Connelly picked up $2,500 for second. Hibschman and Stough each took home $1,475. The entry fee was $58.

Qualifying for the PGA Club Professional Championship was at the Lehigh Country Club on the second Friday of October. Jim Masserio (136) led the qualifying with a pair of 68s. Pete Oakley and Tom Robertson grabbed the next two places with 142s. Bruce MacDonald finished fourth at 143 and Dennis Milne was next at 144. The last three places went to Bob Hibschman (145, Dick Hendrickson (147) and Larry Wise (148) who was back in the Section running a golf club manufacturing company in Hershey. Dick Smith, Sr. was already qualified as the Section champion.

The first annual Pennsylvania PGA Championship was held in the second week of October at the Toftrees Resort and Golf Club. Toftrees added $10,000 to the purse. The tournament was open to members of the Philadelphia Section and the Tri State Section. Playing in two days of rain Rick Osberg captured the title with a 69-73 for a two under par 142. Host professional Jim Masserio made a big move when he brought in a 67 the second day to finish two strokes off the winning pace at 144. The assistant at the Lehigh Country Club, Wayne Phillips finished third at 145. Pete Oakley and Bob Huber tied for fourth with 146 totals. Osberg took home a check for $1,700 from a purse of $11,000.

In the fourth week of October Larry Gilbert won the PGA Club Professional Championship for the second straight year. The tournament was again played over the three courses at the PGA National Golf Club with the final round on the Champions Course. Gilbert posted rounds of 73, 72, 65 and 74 for a 284 that nipped Steve Benson by one stroke. The first prize of $20,000 and the purse of $150,000 were still the same. Jack Seltzer finished third at 286 two strokes in front of Jim Logue (288) and Bob Lendzion (288). Tom Robertson came through with a 290 total and tied for 8th winning $4,500. The tournament was sponsored by the Ram Golf Company and Robertson was a Ram staff member and consultant to the company on clubs and balls. As the player who posted the lowest score for 72 holes playing the Ram golf ball Robertson picked up an additional check for $10,000.  This eighth place finish qualified him for the PGA Cup Matches, which were played against Great Britain and Ireland that next July. Six other Philadelphia Section members made the cut. Jim Masserio tied for 23rd at 295 and Pete Oakley (296) finished one stroke worse, tying for 32nd. Masserio won $1,216.66 and Oakley won $850. Bruce MacDonald (298) tied for 46th and won $379.72. Dick Smith, Sr. (300) tied for 64th, winning $209.43. Dick Hendrickson (304) tied for 93rd and Bob Hibschman (306) tied for 103rd. They each won $209.42. Larry Wise and Dennis Milne missed the cut. 

The Aronimink Golf Club hosted the Challenge Match between the Philadelphia Section and the Middle Atlantic Section in late October. John Clough and the Yamaha Golf Car Company sponsored the matches. The format was a combination of singles and four-ball matches. There were six four-ball matches and twelve singles with a total of 18 points being contested. Philadelphia took a 3½ to 2½ point lead the first day, a Thursday. The teams of Dick Smith, Sr.-Pete Oakley, Harold Perry-Willie Scholl and Henry McQuiston-Sam Penecale won their matches and Jack Connelly-Tom Robertson picked up a half point for halving their match. The next day Connelly, Perry, Robertson, Don Stough and Alan Shankin won their singles matches and everyone else had lost except Don DeAngelis who was playing the last hole. Each team had now won 8½ points. When DeAngelis holed an eight-foot putt on the last green to win his match it gave the Philadelphia Section a 9½ to 8½ point win. The other members of the Philadelphia team were Dennis Milne and Steve Snyder. Oakley only played the first day and Snyder played in his place the second day. Dick Hendrickson was the non-playing captain of the team. With the victory the Philadelphia Section now had nine victories against five for the Middle Atlantic Section.


John Abernethy
"Golf Professional of the Year"
1982

Jack Connelly was elected president of the Philadelphia Section at the fall meeting. The meeting was held at the Ramada Downingtown Inn Resort on the first Friday of November. Harry Hammond and Dave Schueck were reelected to the offices of secretary and treasurer. The new first vice president and tournament chairman was Ted McKenzie and Tom Smith won the race for second vice president in a close vote over the office holder John Poole. Lancaster Country Club professional John Abernethy was the "Golf Professional of the Year" in the Section. He had hosted the A.B. Thorn pro-am for twenty years and he was the Section’s chairman of the Section’s PGA scholarship committee a number of years. Abernethy was also a member of the PGA’s ACE Program, which was a national committee of appointed professionals who had been chosen to be available for counseling of other PGA professionals concerning the golf business. Connelly was the "Player of the Year" in the Section for the fourth time and Dick Smith, Sr. led the DeBaufre Trophy scoring average for a fifth time with 71.70 strokes per round.

A few days after the fall meeting and elections the question arose as to whether all of the golf professionals in the room during the election were eligible to vote. The nonmembers such as the apprentices had not been asked to leave the room during the election. It was decided to hold a new election for the office of first vice president by mail ballot as that was the only office that had been contested by two people. When the votes came back John Poole was elected over Tom Smith.

A long tradition and PGA member’s privilege ended in the third week of November as the "all exempt PGA Tour" came into being. For all intents and purposes a PGA member could no longer play the PGA Tour as a Monday qualifier. To keep it from having the appearance of a closed shop there was still a Monday qualifier for four places in each week’s event. The pros that made it through the PGA Tour Qualifying School were now fully exempt players as of January 1, 1983. The top 125 money winners in 1982 were all exempt for 1983 along with a few other players who had lifetime exemptions for having won major events. Next in line came the 50 successful qualifiers from the Q-School so the higher a player finished in the qualifying school the more sure he was of playing in the tournaments, especially early in the year.

In the first week of December the PGA Seniors’ Championship moved back to the PGA’s national golf club but it was now at the new PGA National Golf Club. After leaving John D. MacArthur’s complex east of the Florida Turnpike the PGA Seniors’ Championship had been held at three different venues. The PGA National still had a Palm Beach Gardens address but the new headquarters was west of the Florida Turnpike. The tournament was played on its Champion Course. The course was set up at 6,520 yards with a par of 72 but it didn’t yield many low rounds as only four players broke 70. Due to a windy first two days a 36-hole score of 156 made the cut. The winner was Don January (288) who put together rounds of 74, 75, 69 and 70 to take the title by one stroke over Julius Boros (289). Boros and Arnold Palmer had held the lead going into the final round. Boros slipped to a 75 and Palmer took 76 strokes. There was a four-way tie for third at 290 among Art Wall, Gay Brewer, Bob Goalby and Palmer. First prize from the $150,000 purse was $25,000. Wall won $11,250 for his rounds of 72, 73, 71 and 74. Stan Dudas (313) tied for 58th and won $355. Mike Souchak also made the cut and won the last money of $285. Al Besselink and Bob Hendricks missed the cut. Wall and Souchak were in the tournament as former members of the Ryder Cup Team and Besselink was in the tournament for having won multiple times on the PGA Tour. Dudas and Hendricks had qualified at the Philadelphia Section’s senior championship.

The week after the PGA Seniors’ Championship the PGA’s national meeting was at the Hyatt Regency hotel in Dallas, Texas. Mark Kizziar was elected president to succeed Joe Black and Mickey Powell moved from treasurer to secretary. The Gulf States Section’s James Ray Carpenter was elected treasurer in a race with Jay McClure. A resolution was passed allowing apprentices to earn credits while working at a driving range after they had earned 18 credits working at a recognized golf course. Resident aliens were now eligible for membership after living in the states for five years. Also the requirement that an applicant for membership have a sponsor was eliminated. Jack Connelly and Harry Hammond represented the Philadelphia Section as delegates.

The PGA "Player of the Year" was Tom Watson, Tom Kite won the Vardon Trophy with a stroke average of 70.21 and the leading money winner was Craig Stadler with $446,462. Jimmy Booros had his best year on the PGA Tour as he earned $51,933 in 26 tournaments. That put him in 91st place on the money list so with the new all-exempt top 125-player list in place for 1983 he was on the tour for another year. Ed Dougherty also played in 26 events and won $27,948, which put him in 128th place. Dougherty had no other choice except to head for the PGA Tour’s qualifying school.

Qualifying for the PGA Tour was held at the PGA Tour’s course, the TPC at Sawgrass. Donnie Hammond led the qualifying by fourteen strokes with a thirteen under par 419. The fourteen-stroke margin is a record that may never be touched. Charlie Bolling, who had grown up at the Gulph Mills Golf Club under the tutelage of head pro Willie Scholl, came to the last hole needing a par to qualify but he finished with a double bogey six and another year of tournaments in foreign countries and mini tours. Brett Upper, who had been playing the mini-tours, also missed qualifying there by two strokes but he and Bolling were now eligible for the PGA Tournament Players Series.

Art Wall played in seven tournaments on the PGA Senior Tour and finished 11th on the money list with $34,958. Al Besselink was in nine tournaments and finished 37th with $12,585. Mike Souchak won $4,828 in five events.

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Charlie Bolling
Won the1983 South African Open
Played four years on PGA Tour
1983 - In late January Charlie Bolling won the South African Open at the Royal Cape Golf Club in Cape Town. Because of the tournament’s long history it was the most prestigious event on the South African Tour, which was known as the Sunshine Circuit. Gary Player was in the field as the defending champion. George Fotheringham, who was the professional at the Williamsport Country Club in 1915, had won five South African Opens between 1908 and 1914. It was Bolling’s second year on the Sunshine Circuit and he had warmed up for this tournament by finishing third to Corey Pavin at the Lexington PGA the week before. After rounds of 71, 67 and 69 he teed off in the fourth round with a two-stroke lead over the rest of the field. A steady one under par 71in the last round gave him a one-stroke victory over South Africa’s Tertius Claassens. Another American Griff Moody, finished third at 280 one stroke in front of Mark James, Nick Price, Mark McNulty and Ronan Rafferty. Twelve players ended up within five strokes of the top prize of 14,000 rand, which was equal to about $13,500.

Charlie Bolling went on to finish third on the South African Tour’s Order-Of-Merit that year, which qualified him for the British Open.

The Philadelphia Section’s spring meeting was held at the Downingtown Inn on the first Monday of April. The Section’s office staff had expanded to three employees, the executive director and two secretaries. The first vice president and tournament chairman Ted McKenzie announced a new tournament, the William Hyndman III Insurance Open. The tournament became a fixture on the Section’s schedule and was held continuously for over 20 years. McKenzie presented a schedule of 43 events with $300,000 in purse money. Section secretary Harry Hammond reported that there were now 338 Section members of which 221 were Class A members. There were also 165 apprentices working toward membership. Junior chairman John Lubin reported that the Junior Golf Academy would be at the Downingtown Inn for the third consecutive year.

At the Masters Tournament in the first full week of April Seve Ballesteros began the last round birdie, eagle, par, eagle and went on to win his second green jacket in four years. Ballesteros’ rounds were 68, 70, 73 and 69 for 280. Ben Crenshaw and Tom Kite tied for second four strokes back at 284. Tom Watson and Ray Floyd tied for fourth with 285s. First prize was $90,000, an increase of $24,000. Art Wall and amateur Jay Sigel missed the cut. The tournament had to finish on Monday as Friday’s round was washed out. Wall was in the field as a former winner of the Masters and Sigel was in the field as the 1982 U.S. Amateur champion.

On the fourth Monday of May Mac O’Grady took a day off from the PGA Tour to compete in the local qualifying rounds for the U.S. Open in Central Pennsylvania. Qualifying was held at the Country Club of Harrisburg. O’Grady put together rounds of 73 and 68 for a one under par 141 that led the five successful qualifiers. Ray Silnik, the assistant at the Bethlehem Steel Club, New York professional Danny Goodman and amateur Rick Hrip tied for second with 145s. Tom Robertson posted a 146 and won a three-way sudden death playoff for the last spot with a birdie on the first extra hole.

The Whitemarsh Valley Country Club and the Green Valley Country Club hosted the local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Philadelphia on the fourth Tuesday of May. Rick Osberg and amateur Bucky Erhardt tied for the medal with 146. They each posted the same scores for the day, 73s in the morning and 73s again in the afternoon. Next in line were Gary Hardin, who was now the assistant at the Cornwells Heights Golf Club, Wayne Phillips, Greg Farrow, Pete Oakley, Louie Biago, an assistant at the Philadelphia Country Club, and amateur Todd Anderson with 149s. Gene Fieger, the assistant at the Rolling Green Golf Club, and Bobby Huber turned in 150s and then prevailed in a seven-man playoff for the last two openings. There were ten openings for the opportunity to move on to the sectional qualifying rounds and scores of 150 played off. Jimmie Booros was exempt from local qualifying as one of the PGA Tour’s exempt players. Charlie Bolling was exempt from local qualifying off his standing on the South African Tour’s Order-of-Merit. Jay Sigel was exempt from local and sectional qualifying as the winner of the 1982 U.S. Amateur.

On the first Tuesday of June Charlie Bolling, Pete Oakley and Jimmy Booros qualified for the U.S. Open in sectional qualifying at the Montclair Golf Club in northern New Jersey. Bolling led a contingent of 19 successful qualifiers by three strokes as he fired the low round of the day, a 67, in the morning and a 70 in the afternoon for 137. Oakley and Booros tied for ninth at 142 as 144 played off for the last spot.

The U.S. Open was played at the Oakmont Country Club near Pittsburgh in the third week of June. Larry Nelson began the Open week by having the airline lose his clubs. He didn’t locate his clubs until 8:45 PM on Tuesday night and then he opened the tournament with rounds of 74 and 73. He started slowly on Saturday and after four holes he was five over par for the tournament. He then played the next 13 holes in seven under par and finished with a 65, which left him just one stroke behind the leaders Tom Watson and Seve Ballesteros. On Sunday his game stayed with him and he was four under par on #15 when play was halted for a thunderstorm. Nelson elected to finish the hole and he made a par, which left him tied with Watson who had marked his ball of #14 green. Play did not resume until Monday morning. When play resumed Nelson took the lead when he birdied the 16th hole by holing a 62-foot putt. Nelson made a par on #17 but he three putted #18 for a 67 and finished at 280. When Watson made a bogey on #17 he needed a birdie on #18 to tie Nelson. Watson flew the green with his second shot and ended up holing a 45-foot putt for a par and 281. First prize was $72,000 from the $506,184 purse. Gil Morgan finished third at 283 three strokes ahead of Ballesteros (286) and Calvin Peete (286). Jimmy Booros (310) made the cut and finished at the end of the money list in a tie for 68th. He won $1,898. Charlie Bolling, amateur Jay Sigel and Pete Oakley failed to make the cut.

Jack Kiefer, who was now living in North Jersey won the New Jersey Open for a third time. His two other wins came in 1975 and 1976. The tournament was held on Baltusrol Golf Club’s Upper Course in the second week of July. While playing 36 holes on the third day Kiefer put together a final round 67 to go with his earlier rounds of 72, 73 and 74. His score of 286 gave him a six-stroke margin over Steve Sieg. Sam Cancellieri, the assistant at the Medford Village Country Club, finished in a three-way tie for third at 293 with David Glenz and Mike Higuera.

In mid July the British Open was held at the Royal Birkdale Golf Club in Southport, England. With four solid rounds Tom Watson held off numerous challengers to win his fifth British Open. That tied him for second all time with J.H. Taylor, James Braid and Peter Thomson, one off Harry Vardon’s six British Open victories. Watson’s rounds were 67, 68, 70 and 70 for 275. Hale Irwin and Andy Bean tied for second at 276 and Graham Marsh finished fourth with the aid of a last round 64. Charlie Bolling missed the cut.

Billy Casper picked up a victory in the U.S. Senior Open to go with his two U.S. Open wins in the fourth week of July. The Hazeltine National Golf Club in Minnesota hosted the tournament. Casper had a four-stroke lead with nine holes to go but he frittered it away and had to one-putt the last green to tie Rod Funseth, which he did. The next day Casper and Funseth played an 18-hole playoff and finished up tied with 75s. The playoff then went into sudden-death. Casper made a birdie 3 on the first hole to take the title. Casper took home a check for $30,566 and a gold medal. Casper’s rounds were 73, 69, 73 and 73 for 288. Miller Barber (290) finished third and Guy Wolstenholme (291) finished fourth. There were no professionals in the field from the Philadelphia Section.

On the first Tuesday of July Ed Dougherty, who was off the PGA Tour and back at Edgmont Country Club as the teaching pro, won the Philadelphia Open at the Rolling Green Golf Club. In the morning round Dougherty toured Rolling Green in a one under par 70 and he came back with a 68 in the afternoon. Dougherty (138) finished four strokes in front of Gene Fieger (142) and five ahead of Harold Perry (143) who was now the assistant at the Eagle Lodge Country Club. Ted McKenzie, Dennis Milne and Frank Dobbs, the assistant at the Spring-Ford Country Club, tied for fourth with 144s. First prize was $1,200 and the entry fee was $48.


Tom Robertson
PGA Cup Team 1983

Tom Robertson returned to his native country of Scotland in late July as a member of the PGA Cup Team. Robertson had been born in Scotland and grew up playing soccer before moving to the United States. He had qualified for the team by finishing in a tie for eighth at the PGA Club Professional Championship the year before. The matches were played each year against a team of club professionals from Great Britain and Ireland. There were nine professionals on each team and three days of matches. The first day there were four foursome matches in the morning and four four-ball matches in the afternoon. The second day was the same except the four-ball matches were in the morning. On the third day there were nine singles matches. That year the PGA Cup Match was played in Muirfield, Scotland. Robertson and his teammates didn’t fare well. When the competition began the wind came up and the Americans won very few matches. Robertson played in all five rounds of the competition winning in the first day’s foursome match and losing the four others. The final tally was Great Britain-Ireland 14 ½ to 6 ½ for the USA.

Gene Fieger won the George Izett Memorial Assistant Pro Championship, which was sponsored by the George Izett Golf Company. The tournament was played at Fieger’s home course, the Rolling Green Golf Club. Fieger and DuPont Country Club assistant Jim Matthias had ended in a tie at one over par 72. On the first hole of a sudden-death playoff Matthias missed a short putt to keep the playoff going and was the winner. First prize was $400.

The Pennsylvania Open was held at the Philadelphia Cricket Club at the beginning of August. The U.S. Amateur champion Jay Sigel came from behind to catch Gene Fieger and win his state open championship for the third time. Sigel with a 70 the first day trailed by two strokes and he was three back after 27 holes on Tuesday. A last nine 34 brought him into the clubhouse a 71 for 141. When Fieger posted a 73 to go with his three under par first round 68 there was a tie for the title at 141. A sudden-death playoff was held beginning on the first hole. After good drives in the fairway they both had well played shots to the green with #7 irons. Sigel two-putted from 15-feet below the hole for his par. Putting from 12-feet above the hole, Fieger stroked his ball two-feet past the hole and then lipped out his next putt to let a local major title slip away. One consolation for Fieger was that he still went home with the first place check of $2,250 from the $14,000 purse. Don DeAngelis finished third one stroke out of the playoff at 142 and one ahead of Harold Perry who finished fourth at 143.

The Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles hosted the PGA Championship in the first week of August. Hal Sutton took the lead with an opening round 65. He followed that up with rounds of 66, 72 and 71 and went wire to wire for the victory. His 274 total earned him a check for $100,000, up $35,000 from the year before and the purse was now $600,000. Jack Nicklaus (275), who trailed by eight strokes after the first round, came back with a second round 65 and a last round 66, but he fell one stroke short of tying Sutton. Peter Jacobson (276) finished third and Pat McGowan (277) finished fourth. Jim Masserio, Pete Oakley and Tom Robertson missed the cut. Masserio, Oakley and Robertson were in the field as a result of having finished in the top 40 at the 1982 PGA Club Professional Championship.

The first Eagle Lodge Classic was played in the second week of August. The tournament was played at the redesigned Eagle Lodge Country Club, which was formerly the Roxborough Country Club. It was Gary Hardin all the way as he led after Monday’s round with a six under par 65 and he came back with a steady 70 on Tuesday. His 155 total won by two strokes. Dick Smith, Sr. (137) finished second with rounds of 67 and 70. Next came Rick Osberg in third place at 138 and Jack Connelly at 139. The purse was $10,525 and Hardin took home a check for $1,700.

Qualifying for the PGA Club Professional Championship was held during the Eagle Lodge Classic. Gary Hardin who had won the tournament gained the first spot with his 135. Dick Smith, Sr. was next with 137 but as it turned out he didn’t need it. Smith earned a spot in the tournament when he won the Section Championship in October. Rick Osberg’s 138 qualified for the third position and Jack Connelly was fourth with a 139. Wayne Phillips and Jay Friedman, the professional at the Meadowlands Country Club, tied for fifth and sixth with 140s. When Smith won the Section Championship the Section picked up another spot and Bruce MacDonald (143) got into the tournament. Tom Robertson, Pete Oakley and Jim Masserio were exempt off having finished in the top 40 in the 1982 PGA Club Professional Championship. Masserio didn’t enter the tournament.

On the fourth Monday of August Stan Dudas qualified for the PGA Seniors’ Championship but he wasn’t able to defend his title as the Section senior champion. The tournament was held at the Oak Terrace Country Club. The tournament went into extra holes when Johnny Markel, the professional at the Berkshire Country Club, turned in a par 71 to tie Dudas (71). Markel wrapped up the title on the fourth extra hole by holing a ten-foot putt for a birdie three. First prize was $200. Henry McQuiston finished third with a 74. Bill Bishop, Charley Lepre, Jerry Pisano and Bob Hendricks tied for fourth with 76s. This was also qualifying for the PGA Seniors’ Championship, which had been moved from December to January of 1984. Markel chose not to enter the national championship so Dudas picked up the qualifying spot as the first alternate. Art Wall was exempt as a former member of the Ryder Cup team and a winner of the Masters Tournament. Al Besselink was exempt as a former winner of two or more tournaments on the PGA Tour. Mike Souchak was exempt as a former Ryder Cup team member but he didn’t enter the tournament.

Rick Osberg sank a ten-foot birdie putt on the 36th hole to win the Westlake Plastics Invitation tournament on the second Monday of September. After a 73 on Sunday that left him tied for 11th Osberg (142) came back with a 69 to grab the title by one stroke. Dick Hendrickson finished second at 143 one stroke ahead of Don Stough (144). Jack Connelly and Willie Scholl tied for fourth with 145s. The Whitford Country Club hosted the tournament again.

The Pennsylvania PGA was held at the Toftrees Resort & Golf Club in the third week of September. Oakmont Country Club professional Bob Ford led all the way as he posted a 70 on Monday and a 71 on Tuesday for a three under par 141. Don DeAngelis turned in a 145 to finish second one stroke in front of Tom Robertson (146) and Valley Brook Country Club professional John Rech (146). First prize was $2,000 and from a purse of $13,000. The entry fee was $58.

The PGA Club Professional Championship was held in the western United States. The championship hosted by the La Quinta Hotel Golf Club in Mission Hills, California began in late September and ended on the first Sunday of October. Arizona’s Larry Webb got in as an alternate and posted a 283 score to walk off with the title. Webb’s rounds of 70, 68, 74 and 71brought him in four strokes in front of Bob Ford who finished second at 287. First prize was $20,000. Bob Wynn (289) finished third and four players tied for fourth. Only one Philadelphia Section member made the cut. Rick Osberg shot a 292 to finish in a three-way tie for 8th, which earned him $4,500. Osberg’s tie for eighth put him in a playoff for the eighth and ninth places on the PGA Cup Team. A sudden-death playoff was held to determine which two players would make the team. On the par-four first hole of the playoff, which was the 10th hole, Osberg was on the green in regulation and the other two missed the green. They both chipped in for birdies and Osberg lost his opportunity to play on a PGA Cup Team. His finish did qualify him for the 1984 PGA Championship. Tom Robertson, Gary Hardin, Dick Smith, Sr., Jack Connelly, Jay Friedman, Pete Oakley, Wayne Phillips and Bruce MacDonald missed the cut.


Dick Smith, Sr.
1983 Section Champion
Won Section Championship for 5th time

In the second week of October Dick Smith, Sr. made it three in a row as he won his third straight Section Championship and his fifth overall. Three straight wins in the Philadelphia Section Championship was a first and his five wins put him in front of Charles Schneider, Sr., who won four and tied him with Art Wall who also won five. Smith was only the third one to win it in consecutive years. Smith also was the host professional for the 89 Section members who entered the championship at the Woodcrest Country Club. No one broke par in Monday’s first round and Smith with a 72 trailed the leaders by one stroke. Playing the last six holes in the rain on Tuesday Smith put together a three under par 68 and took the lead by two-strokes over Jack Connelly, Pete Oakley and Ken Peyre-Ferry. Connelly posted two 71s with Oakley and Peyre-Ferry turning in identical scores of 72 and 70. More rain arrived the next day and Wednesday’s round could not be completed. No contingency plan had been set up for a rain out and when a future date could not be agreed on Smith with a total of 140 was declared the champion. The purse was $19,200 with a first prize $3,500. Connelly, Oakley and Peyre-Ferry each won $1,816 for their second place tie at 142. Dennis Milne and Rick Osberg tied for fifth with 145s and took home checks for $925. The entry fee was $58.

The two-day Delaware Valley Open was held at the Hi-Point Golf Club in the third week of October. Ed Dougherty (141) shot a three under par 69 on Friday to go with Thursday’s 72 and edged out Rick Osberg (142) by one stroke. Larry Demers, the assistant at the Philmont Country Club, and Duke Delcher who was now working in Chicago tied for third with 143s. Dougherty took away a $1,400 check from the $8,600 purse.

The Sands Country Club and its head professional Willie Maples hosted the Section’s Booster Pro-Am. The tournament was held to thank the companies that had sponsored events for the Philadelphia Section during the year and to raise money for the Section’s various programs like junior golf.

The Challenge Cup match between the Philadelphia Section and the Middle Atlantic Section was played at the Columbia Country Club in Chevy Chase, Maryland in late October. The two twelve man teams played six better ball matches on Thursday and twelve singles matches on Friday. The points were even after the first day as the teams of Dick Smith, Sr.-Dick Hendrickson, Gary Hardin-Harold Perry and Pete Oakley-Bob Hibschman each won for Philadelphia. The second day Jack Connelly, Rick Osberg, Ken Peyre-Ferry, Stan Dudas, Hardin and Oakley each won their singles match along with halved matches by Hendrickson and Hibschman to garner the seven points needed for victory. The other two players on the team were Henry McQuiston and Frank Dobbs. The final tally was Philadelphia 10 and Middle Atlantic 8. After fifteen matches with the Middle Atlantic Section pros the Philadelphia Section now led with 10 wins against five loses. Yamaha Golf Car Company sponsored the matches again.


John Lubin
"Golf Professional of the Year"
1983

Jack Connelly was reelected president at the Section’s fall meeting. The meeting was held at the Ramada Downingtown Inn & Country Club on the first Monday of November. Ted McKenzie was reelected first vice president and John Poole was reelected second vice president. Harry Hammond was reelected secretary and George McNamara was elected treasurer. John Lubin was the "Golf Professional of the Year". Lubin had been very instrumental in the promotion of junior golf and had been the Section’s junior golf chairman for several years. The "Player of the Year" was Dick Smith, Sr. and he also won the DeBaufre Trophy with a 71.40 stroke average.

Along with playing the mini-tours, Brett Upper competed in the Tournament Players Series where he finished 12th. He also won the California State Open that year.

Hal Sutton was selected PGA "Player of the Year" and the leading money winner was also Sutton with $426,668. Raymond Floyd won the Vardon Trophy with a stroke average of 70.61 strokes per round. Jimmy Booros just managed to avoid another trip to the PGA Tour’s Q-School by winning $7,560 in his last two tournaments of the year. He entered 31 tournaments and ended up in 125th place on the money list with $34,980. Everyone who was 126th or higher was headed to the qualifying school. Ed Dougherty managed to get into 18 tournaments off his past accomplishments on the PGA Tour, but he won just $9,422.


Brett Upper
PGA Tour Five Years
Won 1990 Club Pro Championship

Brett Upper and Greg Farrow qualified for the PGA Tour in the third week of November. The TPC at Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra, Florida hosted the qualifying. Even though it was the home of the PGA Tour it was only used twice for the Q-School, 1982 and 1983. Upper finished second, two strokes behind Willie Wood, with rounds of 72, 75, 74, 65, 74 and 68 for a total of 428. The 65 was the low round of the week for the entire field and also tied the course record. Farrow made it with one stroke to spare as he tied for 39th. His rounds were 77, 74, 73, 71, 74 and 75 for 444. Fifty-seven pros qualified at that school.


Greg Farrow
Qualified for PGA Tour
RU in Section Championship
2008 & 2012

In the second week of November three hundred delegates and alternates attended the national PGA meeting at the Opryland Hotel in Nashville, Tennessee. Dick Smith, Sr. had been chosen by the Philadelphia Section to represent District II for the three-year term as a director of the PGA of America. Since the PGA had been formed in 1916 the position had been called vice president. The change was made because the office of secretary was now going to be vice president. Reelected to office were President Mark Kizziar, Vice President (formerly secretary) Mickey Powell and Treasurer James Ray Carpenter. Another change was that for the first time there would be two non-golf professional members of the PGA Board. The PGA of America contributed $100,000 to the USGA building fund. The World Golf Hall of Fame in Pinehurst, North Carolina and its artifacts was transferred to the PGA at no cost. The opening day of the meeting featured a computer presentation for the executive directors that demonstrated the use of computers for bookkeeping and the performance of other office functions. The delegates were informed that their members would no longer have to pay green fees during the Winter Tournament Program at the PGA National Golf Club. The Section’s delegates to the national meeting were Jack Connelly and Harry Hammond.

Don January led the PGA Senior Tour in money winnings with $237,571. Mike Souchak won $14,077 in eight tournaments, which was good for 39th on the money list. Al Besselink earned $8,273 in eleven events and Art Wall only entered two tournaments, earning $7,130.

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1984 - The 1983 PGA Seniors’ Championship wasn’t played until January of 1984. The tournament was played at the PGA National Golf Club’s Champion Course in the third week of the month. In less than five years the purse had doubled by going from $100,000 to $200,000. Arnold Palmer led from wire to wire in winning PGA Seniors’ Championship but his scores were up and down. He opened the tournament with a 69, which put him in a four-way tie at the top of the leader board. In the second round Palmer shot an unbelievable nine under par 63 on a day when only three other players broke 70 and the next lowest score was a 68. At the halfway point Palmer held the lead by eight strokes over Don January. The course was set up 500-yards shorter than it had been in late 1982 when the seniors were there for the first time, and it turned out to be a good idea. In the third round the weather turned bad with temperatures in the 40s accompanied by stiff winds. That day Palmer needed 16 more stokes to complete his round as he posted a 79 but at the end of the day he still led by two strokes. The last day no one broke 70. Palmer and January (284) both turned in 71s as Palmer (282) won his second PGA Seniors’ Championship. First prize was $35,000. Bill Collins finished third with a 290 total. Bob Goalby and Peter Thomson tied for fourth with 292s. Art Wall posted rounds of 72, 73, 74 and 77 for 296, which earned him a tie for 13th and a check for $3,800. Stan Dudas (317) finished near the end of the money list in 61st place, winning $560. Al Besselink and Mike Souchak missed the cut. Wall and Souchak were in the tournament as former Ryder Cup Team members and Besselink was there as a former multiple winner on the PGA Tour. Dudas had qualified at the Philadelphia PGA Senior Championship.

Ed Dougherty, now the professional at the Cobbs Creek Golf Club, won the Match Play Championship during the Winter Tournament Program. Due to the move of the PGA Seniors’ Championship from December to January the match play was moved back one week to the fourth week of January. The tournament was also moved to the Crane Creek Course at Martin Downs Country Club in Palm City. To make it to the finals Dougherty won six matches, with only two reaching the 18th green. He defeated Jack Seltzer by the count of 2&1 in the finals. The win earned Dougherty an exemption into the TPS Series.

Charlie Bolling was exempt for the PGA Tour’s 1984 Tournament Players Series. He had finished 12th on the 1983 PGA Club Professional Tournament Series. The top 15 earned exemptions.

The Section’s spring meeting was held at the Americana Host Farm Resort on the first Monday of April. The tournament chairman Ted McKenzie announced that the Challenge Cup matches sponsored by the Yamaha Golf Car Company were being expanded to include the Carolinas PGA Section as well as the Middle Atlantic Section. The number of players on each team was also increased from twelve members to 25. The matches were scheduled for November at the Foxfire Country Club in Pinehurst, North Carolina. Brett Upper and Greg Farrow were on the PGA Tour.

Ben Crenshaw won the Masters Tournament in the first full week of April with four steady rounds of 67, 72, 70 and 68. His 277 score finished two strokes in front of Tom Watson. His winning check for $108,000 was the first six-figure payoff in a major championship. David Edwards and Ben Crenshaw tied for third with 280s. Amateur Jay Sigel and Art Wall missed the cut. Wall was invited to the Masters as a former winner of the tournament and Sigel was in the field as a result of having won the U.S. Amateur for a second straight year.

On the third Monday of May Jim Masserio and Stu Ingraham, the assistant at the Lebanon Country Club, tied for medalist honors in the local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Central Pennsylvania. The Colonial Country Club hosted the event. Masserio (142) had rounds of 72-70 and Ingraham (142) posted a pair of par 71s. Danny O’Neill, who was now playing on various professional tours, finished tied for third at 143 with Sherm Keeney who made a big comeback in the afternoon with a 68. Williamsport amateur Warren Choate picked up the fifth and last spot at 144.

Brett Upper, home from the PGA Tour, and amateur Todd Anderson tied for the medal at the local qualifying for the U.S. Open in Philadelphia. Aronimink Golf Club and the Waynesborough Country Club hosted qualifying on the fourth Tuesday of May. There were eleven spots to play for and all scores of 148 and lower made it. Upper (142) began with a five over par 75 at Aronimink and came back with a five under par 67 in the afternoon at Waynesborough. Anderson (142) had a 73 at Aronimink and a 69 at Waynesborough. Sunnybrook Golf Club assistant Kevin Whitlow, Pete Oakley and amateur G. MacDonald tied for third with 145s. Willie Scholl finished alone at 146 in sixth place. Greg Farrow, who was also home from the PGA Tour, and Steve Thomas from Lakewood, New Jersey tied for seventh with 147s. Dick Smith, Sr., Charlie Bolling and amateur Bill Lawler tied for the last three spots with 148s. Jay Sigel was fully exempt as the winner of the 1983 U.S. Amateur.

Charlie Bolling successfully made it through sectional qualifying for the U.S. Open in northern New Jersey at the Montclair Golf Club. Qualifying was held on the first Tuesday of June. Bolling (66-74) tied for fifth with a 140 as 22 pros and amateurs earned spots in the Open. The low qualifier was Jim Albus at 137 and it took a score of 143 to qualify.

The Winged Foot Golf Club’s West Course in New York hosted the U.S. Open in the third week of June. Winged Foot had a well-deserved reputation for being a very difficult course but it played a little easier that year. Fuzzy Zoeller posted rounds of 71, 66, 69 and 70 for a four under par 276 and Greg Norman had rounds of 70, 68, 69 and 69 for 276. Norman holed a 40-foot par putt from the collar of the last green to get the tying score. In an 18-hole playoff on Monday both players birdied the first hole but Zoeller also birdied the second hole against Norman’s double bogie and the rout was on. Zoeller led by five strokes at the turn and he finished with a 67 against Norman’s 75. Zoeller’s 67 was the lowest score ever shot in a U.S. Open playoff. First prize was $94,000. Curtis Strange finished third at 281 one stroke ahead of Johnny Miller and Jim Thorpe who tied for fourth with 282s. Amateur Jay Sigel (294) tied for 43rd and Charlie Bolling missed the cut.

Qualifying for the U.S. Senior Open was at the Meadowlands Country Club on the third Monday of June. Amateurs won the two spots as Art Kramer won the medal with a 74 one stroke in front of Allen Sussel (75). Stan Dudas picked up the first alternate spot by defeating Henry McQuiston in a sudden death playoff after they had tied for third with 77s. Dudas got into the tournament as an alternate.

The U.S. Senior Open was played on the Oak Hill Country Club’s East Course at the end of June. Miller Barber posted rounds of 74, 71, 70 and 71 for a six over par 286 to finish two strokes ahead of Arnold Palmer (288) and win his second U.S. Senior Open. Gay Brewer (291) and Bob Goalby (292) finished third and fourth. First prize was $36,448. Stan Dudas made the cut and finished tied for 63rd, winning $681.50.

Rick Osberg, who was now the teaching pro at the Waynesborough Country Club, won the Philadelphia Section Assistant Pro Championship on the second Monday of July. The Brookside Country Club in Pottstown hosted the tournament. Osberg won by three strokes with a five under par 67. Frank Dobbs, now the assistant at the Oak Terrace Country Club, and Stu Ingraham tied for second with 70s. Sandy Run Country Club assistant Fred Purdy, Philadelphia Cricket Club assistant Tim Gavronski, Ray Silnik and Noel Caruso, who was the assistant at the Whitford Country Club, tied for fourth at 73.

Charlie Bolling qualified for the British Open in mid July by winning an eight-man playoff for the last spot in the tournament. The Open was played on the Royal & Ancient Golf Club at St. Andrews in the third week of July. Seve Ballesteros won the tournament and denied Tom Watson a shot at immortality. Watson was trying for his sixth win in the Open, which would have tied him with Harry Vardon. Watson teed off on the 17th and next to last hole tied with Ballesteros. Watson’s second shot finished over the road near the wall, from where he made a bogey against a par for Ballesteros. Ballesteros then birdied the 72nd hole to win by two strokes with rounds of 69, 68, 70 and 69. Watson tied for second with Bernard Langer at 278. Fred Couples and Lanny Watkins tied for fourth with 281s. Bolling missed the cut.

Frank Dobbs made five birdies on the back nine of his opening round and went on to win the Philadelphia Open at the Indian Valley Country Club on the last day of July, a Tuesday. Dobbs’ rounds were 68 and 73 for a three under par 141 total. He picked up a check for $1,350 from the $7,160 purse. Gene Fieger, back as an assistant at The Springhaven Club where he grew up playing, won $1,000 as he and amateur Jim Kania tied for second with 143s. The professional at the West Chester Golf & Country Club Jerry Day, Jack Connelly, and amateur Chet Walsh tied for fourth at 144. The defending champion Ed Dougherty didn’t enter the tournament. The entry fee was $55.

The Eagle Lodge Country Club hosted the two-day Eagle Lodge Classic in the first week of August. Frank Dobbs opened with the only sub-70 score on Sunday as he posted a 67. For most of the day on Monday Dobbs struggled to find his form from Sunday, but he holed a putt of 60 feet on the last green to save the day. That put him in the clubhouse with a one over par 72 and a 139 total. It was just good enough to give him a one stroke win over Ed Dougherty, John Carson and Pete Oakley, who all tied for second with 140s. The purse was $10,000 and first prize was $1,700.

Qualifying for the PGA Club Professional Championship was held during the Eagle Lodge Classic. Ed Dougherty and Pete Oakley led the qualifying with 140s. Dougherty posted a pair of 70s and Oakley turned in a 72 and a 68. Frank Dobbs, who had won the tournament, wasn’t eligible as he wasn’t a PGA member yet. Next in line were Dick Smith, Sr. at 143, Dick Hendrickson at 144, Don DeAngelis at 145 and Willie Scholl at 146. Jay Friedman posted a 147 and won a playoff for the last spot. Rick Osberg had an exemption off his tie for eighth at the PGA Club Professional Championship the year before.

In mid August the PGA Championship was played in the Deep South at the Shoal Creek Country Club in Alabama. Lee Trevino won the PGA for a second time and became the first player to break 70 all four days. His rounds were 69, 68, 67 and 69 for 273. Gary Player and Lanny Watkins tied for second four strokes back with 277s. Calvin Peete finished fourth at 278. First prize was $125,000. Calvin Peete finished fourth at 278. Rick Osberg who was in the tournament off his tie for eighth in the 1983 PGA Club Professional Championship missed the cut.

The Sewickley Heights Golf Club near Pittsburgh hosted the Pennsylvania Open in the third week of August. At the end of the first day, a Monday, Frank Dobbs led by three strokes with a two under par 70. The second day Dobbs slipped a little with a 74 and Allegheny Country Club professional Roy Vucinich passed him with the only sub 70 round of the tournament, a 69. Vucinich won with a (74-69) 143 score and took home a check for $2,520. The total purse was $14,000. Dobbs’ total was 144 and he finished four strokes in front of Jim Ferree (148). Gary Hardin and Mike Moses, the assistant at the Chester Valley Golf Club, tied for fourth with 149s.

Charlie Bolling won the $200,000 Everett Open at Everett Golf & Country Club on Labor Day. The Everett Open in Everett, Washington was one of the stops on the PGA Tour’s 1984 Tournament Players Series. Bolling put together rounds of 70, 66, 67 and 66 for a fifteen under par 269 and the first prize of $36,000. Peter Oosterhuis finished second four strokes back at 273 and Andy Dillard was next at 275. Seven players including Dave Stockton and Chi Chi Rodriguez tied for fourth with 276s.

Six days later Charlie Bolling won the $160,000 PEZ Victoria Open at the Uplands Golf Club in Victoria, British Columbia. The $29,000 check for the win moved Bolling to the top of the Tournament Players Series 1984 money list. His rounds were 66, 63 and 69 for a twelve under par 198. Terry Snodgrass finished two strokes back at 200, Mike Hulbert shot 203 and Tom Costello was at 204. This was the first time that anyone had won back-to-back tournaments on that tour.

Don DeAngelis led all the way as he won the $20,000 Westlake Plastics Invitation tournament. The Whitford Country Club hosted the tournament in the second week of September. DeAngelis began with a three under par 69 on Sunday, which left him tied for the lead and followed it up with a 72 on Monday for his winning score of 141. A birdie two on the 35th hole allowed him to edge out Jim Masserio (142) and Stu Ingraham (142) by one stroke. Dick Hendrickson, Gene Fieger and Wayne Phillips, now the head professional at the Mahoning Valley Country Club, tied for fourth with 143s. First prize was $2,500.

Stan Dudas qualified for the PGA Seniors’ Championship by winning the Section Senior Championship. The tournament was played at the Oak Terrace Country Club on the first Friday of September. Henry McQuiston and Sam Penecale tied for the next qualifying spot and McQuiston earned a December trip to Florida in a sudden death playoff. Art Wall and Mike Souchak had exemptions into the tournament as former members of the Ryder Cup Team. Al Besselink was exempt as a career multiple winner on the PGA Tour.

The Tournament Players Series’ last tournament of the year kicked off on the second Thursday of September with Charlie Bolling as its leading money winner by a margin of $10,760. There was a large incentive to win the money title and that was an exemption to the 1985 PGA Tour. That last event on the schedule was the Sacramento Golf Classic hosted by the Rancho Murieta Country Club near Sacramento, California. Bolling began the tournament with a triple bogie on the first hole but he went on to post rounds of 73, 69, 67 and 70 to finish tied for third just one shot out of a tie for first. Pat McGowan won the tournament in a playoff with Steve Hart. Bolling won $10,233.

Charlie Bolling finished the year as the leading money winner on the PGA Tour’s Tournament Players Series with $79,506. He ended up with $20,993 more than the second place money winner. His scoring average was 69.92 strokes per round. He was now an exempt player on the 1985 PGA Tour. The amazing thing was that he had only won money in three events, $4,273, with three tournaments left on the schedule. At that point he was in 65th place on the money list. In late August he had returned from a foreign tour and flew to the West Coast for the last three tournaments just hoping to get in a good frame of mind for a fourth attempt at the PGA Tour’s qualifying school. Now he had earned the number 126 place on the exempt list, just behind the 1984 PGA Tour’s top 125 money winners. The 50 qualifiers at the qualifying school would all be earning places behind Bolling.

The Pennsylvania PGA Championship was played at the Toftrees Resort & Golf Club in the fourth week of September. Pete Oakley put together a first round 71 on Monday and came back with a four under par 68 on Tuesday to tie the host pro Jim Masserio at 139 for the top prize. Masserio’s rounds were 68 and 71. Oakley holed a birdie putt of 8-feet for the victory on the second hole of a sudden death playoff. Oakley’s cut from the $13,150 purse was $2,000. The entry fee was $58.

Gene Fieger won the Delaware Valley Open in the first week of October at the Hi-Point Golf Club. Fieger put together back-to-back 71s on Thursday and Friday for a two under par 142. Ed Dougherty finished second with a 144 one stroke ahead of Ken Peyre-Ferry (145), Don DeAngelis (145) and Don Stough (145). The total purse was $12,500 and Fieger took home $2,000.

After a one-year absence the PGA Club Professional Championship was back at the PGA National Golf Club, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida in the second week of October. The Champion, Haig and General courses were used for the first three rounds and the final round was played on the Champion Course. The championship came down to a playoff for the sixth time in its seventeen-year history. Indiana’s Bill Schumaker defeated New Jersey’s Gary Ostrega on the first hole of sudden death after they had tied for first with 284s. Schumaker’s rounds were 73, 69, 72 and 70. Rick Osberg put together a last round 68 to go with earlier rounds of 71, 74 and 73. His 286 total gave him a third place tie with Larry Gilbert and a check for $11,000. First prize was $25,000. Ed Dougherty posted a 289 and tied for eighth, winning $5,750. Osberg and Dougherty would have made the 1985 PGA Cup team but after twelve years of PGA Cup Matches a decision had been made to skip the odd numbered years. Pete Oakley (293) ended up in a fifteen-way tie for 39th and won $675. The top 40 qualified for the 1985 PGA Championship and the 1985 Club Professional Championship. The tiebreaker for those that had tied for the last openings was their last round scores. Oakley lost out with a last round of 73 as two players who had shot 71s earned the 39th and 40th spots into the PGA Championship and the Club Pro for 1985. Dick Smith, Sr., Willie Scholl, Don DeAngelis, Dick Hendrickson, and Jay Friedman missed the cut.


Jim Masserio
1984 Section Champion

Ron Rolfe and the North Hills Country Club hosted the Section Championship in the third week of October. The tournament came down to a playoff between perennial runner-up Jack Connelly and Jim Masserio. Masserio led Monday’s first round with a three under par 68 and he followed that up with a 74 to trail the leader by one stroke. In the meantime Connelly was four strokes off the lead after rounds of 72 and 73. On Wednesday Masserio posted a 71 and Connelly put together a 68 that left the two pros tied at 213. There was a sudden-death playoff that same day which went to the third hole after the two players had halved the first two holes with pars. On the par three third hole Masserio was on the green with his tee shot and Connelly was bunkered. Masserio three putted from 50 feet for a bogey. Connelly had played his bunker shot onto the green twenty-five feet from the hole and he three putted for a double bogey making Masserio the new Section champion. Masserio took away a check for $4,000 from the $22,300 purse and Connelly won $2,500. The entry fee was $60. Ed Dougherty now playing out of the Cobbs Creek Golf Club finished third at 214 one stroke ahead of Harold Perry (215), who was now the head professional at the Eagles Nest Golf Club.

The Challenge Cup matches sponsored by the Yamaha Golf Car Company were expanded to include the Carolinas PGA Section as well as the Middle Atlantic Section. The teams were also increased in the number of participants. There were now 25 players on each team instead of twelve. The Foxfire Country Club in Pinehurst, North Carolina hosted the matches in the first week of November. The format was individual stroke play with the low 15 scores each day contributing to the team score. The team score was represented by an 18-hole average. The team members and the low individual scorers earned money from the $50,000 purse. The Carolinas Section came out on top of the team competition with a total of 2,163 strokes an 18-hole average of 72.10. Philadelphia finished second with 2,190 strokes for an average of 72.87 and the Middle Atlantic took 2,222 strokes, which averaged 74.10. Each of the winning team members earned $300, Philadelphia’s players each received $200 and the Middle Atlantic pros picked up checks for $100. In the individual competition the Carolinas’ Jack Lewis finished on top at 138 and earned $1,500. Three of Philadelphia’s team members tied for second as Ed Dougherty, Frank Dobbs and Dick Smith, Sr. posted 141s. They each earned $900. The other members of the Philadelphia team were John Carson, Jack Connelly, Don DeAngelis, Overbrook Golf Club assistant Larry Demers, Gene Fieger, Gary Hardin, Dick Hendrickson, Sherm Keeney, Burlington Country Club professional Michael Mack, Ted McKenzie, Pete Oakley, Rick Osberg, Philadelphia Country Club teaching professional Tony Perla, Harold Perry, Ken Peyre-Ferry, Wayne Phillips, Tom Robertson, Burlington Country Club assistant Butch Schmehl, Willie Scholl, Steve Snyder and along with seniors Sam Penecale and Henry McQuiston.


Harry Hammond
Section President
1985

The Section’s fall meeting and election of officers was held at the Americana Host Farm Resort on the fifth Monday of October. Harry Hammond moved up from secretary to president and Ted McKenzie was reelected first vice president. The professional from the White Manor Country Club, Alan Flashner, was elected second vice president and Ben Steele, the professional at the Hershey’s Mill Golf Club, was elected secretary. George McNamara was reelected treasurer. Ted McKenzie was the "Golf Professional of the Year". McKenzie had won the Section Championship, hosted the Section Championship and for many years he had served on the tournament committee, which he now chaired. He had been a member of the old "Board of Control" and he was now serving as a Section officer. The "Player of the Year" was Pete Oakley. Oakley also won the DeBaufre Trophy with a stroke average of 71.90 for the 17 designated rounds and he led the Yamaha points competition with 125.32 points.

In mid November the PGA of America’s annual meeting was held at the Williams Plaza in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Mickey Powell moved into the office of president and James Ray Carpenter was elected vice president. Southern California’s Pat Reilly was elected treasurer as he defeated Earl Maurer and Mack McCarley on the first ballot. A key topic among the delegates was an urge for the PGA to get into the business of leasing and managing golf facilities. The impetus for that came out of the Club Relations committee. The committee’s platform also included starting a PGA consulting service and the creation of field representatives to work on employment. The classification of Junior A was changed to A-8 to eliminate the stigma of the word junior. The delegates to the meeting were Jack Connelly and Harry Hammond. Dick Smith, Sr. was also in attendance as the national vice president representing District II.


Ted McKenzie
"Golf Professional of the Year"
1984

With three tournaments left in the year Brett Upper was 126th on the money list. The next week he made the cut and won some money. In the next to last tournament of the year at Disney World he birdied the last three holes of the third round to make the cut on the number in the five round event. His winnings at Disney moved him into 124th place on the year-long money list. The next week the PGA Tour was in Pensacola for the last tournament of the year. The year came down to the last nine holes. Upper made nine straight pars to tie for 44th, earning him just enough money to finish in the #125 spot on the PGA Tour’s money list. His winnings of $37,782 in 31 events allowed him to barely escape another trip to the PGA Tour’s qualifying school. Jimmy Booros and Greg Farrow were not so fortunate. Booros played in 29 tournaments but he finished 158th on the money list with $18,446. Farrow was only able to play in nine events and won just $590. Charlie Bolling got into five tournaments and won $760.

Jimmy Booros had been exempt into the final PGA Tour’s qualifying school but he failed to qualify there. It was Booros’ ninth trip to what was becoming called Q-School. He had been successful in 1976 and 1980 and had been on the PGA Tour for five years.

There was a second PGA Seniors’ Championship in 1984 and it was also held at the PGA National Golf Club. The tournament was played on the Champion Course in early December. Australia’s Peter Thomson, a five-time British Open winner, led from start to finish and picked up the largest check, $40,000, of his career. Thomson’s (286) rounds of 67, 73, 74 and 72 brought him in three strokes in front of Don January (287). Art Wall tied for third at 292 with Lee Elder and Orville Moody. Wall won $12,293 for his rounds of 70, 76, 73 and 73. Stan Dudas (317) also made the cut and finished 61st, winning $560. Mike Souchak, Henry McQuiston and Al Besselink missed the cut. Souchak and Wall were in the tournament as former Ryder Cup Team members. Dudas and McQuiston had qualified in the Section. Besselink was in the tournament as a former multiple-winner on the PGA Tour.

Don January led the PGA Senior Tour list for a second straight year with $328,597. Art Wall was healthy again and played in 18 tournaments on the PGA Senior Tour. It was evident that the Senior Tour was becoming more than a series of exhibitions as Wall earned $75,190 but he was only 18th on the money list. Al Besselink won $12,404 in twelve tournaments and Mike Souchak won $11,631 in seven events.

The leading money winner on the PGA Tour was Tom Watson with $476,260 and he was also the PGA "Player of the Year". Calvin Peete won the Vardon Trophy with a stroke average of 70.56 strokes per round.

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